Jane Austen

Lettere 151-161
traduzione di Giuseppe Ierolli

  141-150      |     indice lettere     |     home page     |      Appendice

151
(Thursday 20 - Friday 21 February 1817)
Fanny Knight, Godmersham


Chawton Feb: 20. -

My dearest Fanny

You are inimitable, irresistable. You are the delight of my Life. Such Letters, such entertaining Letters as you have lately sent! - Such a description of your queer little heart! - Such a lovely display of what Imagination does. - You are worth your weight in Gold, or even in the new Silver Coinage. - I cannot express to you what I have felt in reading your history of yourself, how full of Pity & Concern & Admiration & Amusement I have been. You are the Paragon of all that is Silly & Sensible, common-place & eccentric, Sad & Lively, Provoking & Interesting. - Who can keep pace with the fluctuations of your Fancy, the Capprizios of your Taste, the Contradictions of your Feelings? - You are so odd! - & all the time, so perfectly natural - so peculiar in yourself, & yet so like everybody else! - It is very, very gratifying to me to know you so intimately. You can hardly think what a pleasure it is to me, to have such thorough pictures of your Heart. - Oh! what a loss it will be, when you are married. You are too agreable in your single state, too agreable as a Neice. I shall hate you when your delicious play of Mind is all settled down into conjugal & maternal affections. Mr J. W. frightens me. - He will have you. - I see you at the Altar. - I have some faith in Mrs C. Cage's observation, & still more in Lizzy's; & besides, I know it must be so. He must be wishing to attach you. It would be too stupid & too shameful in him, to be otherwise; & all the Family are seeking your acquaintance. - Do not imagine that I have any real objection, I have rather taken a fancy to him than not, & I like Chilham Castle for you; - I only do not like you shd marry anybody. And yet I do wish you to marry very much, because I know you will never be happy till you are; but the loss of a Fanny Knight will be never made up to me; My "affec: Neice F. C. Wildman" will be but a poor Substitute. I do not like your being nervous & so apt to cry; - it is a sign you are not quite well, but I hope Mr Scud - as you always write his name, (your Mr Scuds: amuse me very much) will do you good. - What a comfort that Cassandra should be so recovered! - It is more than we had expected. - I can easily beleive she was very patient & very good. I always loved Cassandra, for her fine dark eyes & sweet temper. - I am almost entirely cured of my rheumatism; just a little pain in my knee now and then, to make me remember what it was, & keep on flannel. - Aunt Cassandra nursed me so beautifully! - I enjoy your visit to Goodnestone, it must be a great pleasure to you, You have not seen Fanny Cage in any comfort so long. I hope she represents & remonstrates & reasons with you, properly. Why should you be living in dread of his marrying somebody else ? - (Yet, how natural!) - You did not chuse to have him yourself; why not allow him to take comfort where he can? - In your conscience you know that he could not bear a comparison with a more animated Character. - You cannot forget how you felt under the idea of its' having been possible that he might have dined in Hans Place. - My dearest Fanny, I cannot bear You should be unhappy about him. Think of his Principles, think of his Father's objection, of want of Money, of a coarse Mother, of Brothers & Sisters like Horses, of Sheets sewn across &c. - But I am doing no good - no, all that I urge against him will rather make you take his part more, sweet perverse Fanny. - And now I will tell you that we like your Henry to the utmost, to the very top of the Glass, quite brimful. - He is a very pleasing young Man. I do not see how he could be mended. He does really bid fair to be everything his Father and Sister could wish; and William I love very much indeed, & so we do all, he is quite our own William. In short we are very comfortable together - that is, we can answer for ourselves. - Mrs Deedes is as welcome as May, to all our Benevolence to her Son; we only lamented that we cd not do more, & that the £50 note we slipt into his hand at parting was necessarily the Limit of our Offering. - Good Mrs Deedes! - I hope she will get the better of this Marianne, & then I wd recommend to her & Mr D. the simple regimen of separate rooms. - Scandal & Gossip; - yes I dare say you are well stocked; but I am very fond of Mrs C. Cage, for reasons good. Thank you for mentioning her praise of Emma &c. - I have contributed the marking to Uncle H.'s shirts, & now they are a complete memorial of the tender regard of many. - Friday. I had no idea when I began this yesterday, of sending it before your Br went back, but I have written away my foolish thoughts at such a rate that I will not keep them many hours longer to stare me in the face. - Much obliged for the Quadrilles, which I am grown to think pretty enough, though of course they are very inferior to the Cotillions of my own day. - Ben & Anna walked here last Sunday to hear Uncle Henry, & she looked so pretty, it was quite a pleasure to see her, so young & so blooming & so innocent, as if she had never had a wicked Thought in her Life - which yet one has some reason to suppose she must have had, if we beleive the Doctrine of Original Sin, or if we remember the events of her girlish days. -

I hope Lizzy will have her Play. Very kindly arranged for her. Henry is generally thought very good-looking, but not so handsome as Edward. - I think I prefer his face. - Wm is in excellent Looks, has a fine appetite & seems perfectly well. - You will have a great Break-up at Gm in the Spring, You must feel their all going. It is very right however. One sees many good causes for it. - Poor Miss C. - I shall pity her, when she begins to understand herself. - Your objection to the Quadrilles delighted me exceedingly. - Pretty Well, for a Lady irrecoverably attached to one Person! - Sweet Fanny, beleive no such thing of yourself. - Spread no such malicious slander upon your Understanding, within the Precincts of your Imagination. - Do not speak ill of your Sense, merely for the Gratification of your Fancy. - Yours is Sense, which deserves more honourable Treatment. - You are not in love with him. You never have been really in love with him. - Yrs very affecly

J. Austen

Uncle H. & Miss Lloyd dine at Mr Digweed's today, which leaves us the power of asking Uncle & Aunt F.- to come & meet their Nephews here.

Miss Knight
Godmersham Park
Faversham
Kent

151
(giovedì 20 - venerdì 21 febbraio 1817)
Fanny Knight, Godmersham


Chawton 20 feb. -

Mia carissima Fanny

Sei inimitabile, irresistibile. Sei la delizia della mia Vita. Che Lettere, che Lettere divertenti mi hai mandato ultimamente! - Che descrizione del tuo cuoricino in ambasce! - Che incantevole dimostrazione di ciò che può fare l'Immaginazione. - Vali tanto Oro quanto pesi, o anche tante delle nuove Monete d'Argento. (1) - Non riesco a esprimere quanto mi ha colpita leggere la tua storia narrata da te stessa, come mi sono trovata colma di Compassione, di Interesse, di Ammirazione, di Divertimento. Sei un Modello di tutto ciò che è Sciocco e Assennato, banale ed eccentrico, Triste e Vivace, Irritante e Coinvolgente. - Chi può tenere il passo con le oscillazioni della tua Fantasia, con i Capricci dei tuoi Gusti, con le Contraddizioni dei tuoi Sentimenti? - Sei così strana! - e allo stesso tempo, così perfettamente naturale - così originale, eppure così simile a tutti gli altri! - Per me è molto, molto gratificante conoscerti così intimamente. Non puoi immaginare che piacere è per me, avere un ritratto così completo del tuo Cuore. - Oh! che perdita sarà, quando ti sposerai. Sei troppo simpatica nel tuo stato di nubile, troppo simpatica come Nipote. Ti odierò quando i deliziosi giochi della tua Mente saranno soffocati nell'affetto coniugale e materno. Mr J. W. mi spaventa. - Ti avrà. - Ti vedo all'Altare. (2) - Ho una certa fiducia nell'acume di Mrs C. Cage, e ancora di più in quello di Lizzy; e inoltre, so che sarà così. Lui vuole di sicuro conquistarti. Sarebbe troppo stupido e troppo vergognoso da parte sua, fare altrimenti, e tutta la Famiglia cerca di farvi fare conoscenza. - Non pensare che io abbia qualche obiezione concreta, sono propensa più a considerarlo simpatico che no, e Chilham Castle per te mi piace; - solo che non mi piace l'idea di vederti sposata chiunque esso sia. Eppure ti auguro tantissimo di sposarti, perché so che non sarai mai felice finché non lo farai; ma la perdita di una Fanny Knight non mi andrà mai giù; la Mia "affezionata Nipote F. C. Wildman" sarà solo una misera Sostituta. Non mi piace saperti così nervosa e così incline al pianto; - è segno che non stai del tutto bene, ma spero che Mr Scud - come scrivi sempre il suo nome (i tuoi Mr Scud: quanto mi divertono) ti farà star bene. - Che sollievo che Cassandra si sia ripresa così bene! - È più di quanto ci aspettassimo. - Mi riesce facile credere che sia stata molto paziente e molto buona. Ho sempre amato Cassandra, per i suoi begli occhi scuri e per il suo carattere dolce. - Io sono quasi interamente guarita dai miei reumatismi; solo un lieve dolore al ginocchio di tanto in tanto, per farmi ricordare che c'erano, e per continuare con la flanella. - La Zia Cassandra mi ha assistito magnificamente! - Mi rallegra la tua visita a Goodnestone, deve averti fatto molto piacere, Tu che non vedevi da tanto Fanny Cage in tutta calma. Spero che con te parli, reclami e ragioni, in modo appropriato. Perché dovresti vivere nel terrore che lui (3) si sposi con qualcun'altra? - (Eppure, com'è naturale!) - Sei tu che hai deciso di non volerlo; perché non permettergli di consolarsi come può? - Dentro di te lo sai che non reggerebbe il paragone con un Temperamento più vivace. - Non puoi aver dimenticato come ti sentivi all'idea che forse avrebbe potuto pranzare a Hans Place. - Mia carissima Fanny, non posso sopportare che Tu sia infelice a causa sua. Pensa ai suoi Principi, alle obiezioni del Padre, alla mancanza di Denaro, alla volgarità della Madre, ai Fratelli e alle Sorelle simili a Cavalli, alle Lenzuola cucite al contrario ecc. - Ma non sto combinando nulla di buono - no, tutto ciò che dico contro di lui ti spingerà piuttosto a prendere le sue parti, dolce e perversa Fanny. - E ora ti dirò che il nostro affetto per il tuo Henry è al massimo, arriva all'orlo del Bicchiere, anzi trabocca. - È un Giovanotto molto simpatico. Non vedo come possa migliorare. Promette davvero di diventare tutto ciò che il Padre e la Sorella possono desiderare; e a William voglio davvero molto bene, e così tutte noi, è sempre il nostro William. In breve stiamo molto bene insieme - ovvero, possiamo garantirlo per noi. Mrs Deedes è benvenuta come la primavera, con tutta la nostra Benevolenza verso il Figlio; (4) ci rammarichiamo soltanto di non poter fare di più, e quelle 50 sterline che gli abbiamo fatto scivolare in mano quando è partito erano per forza di cose il Massimo che potessimo offrire. (5) - La buona Mrs Deedes! - Spero che abbia dato il meglio di sé con questa Marianne, (6) e poi raccomanderei a lei e a Mr D. il semplice regime delle camere separate. Scandali e Pettegolezzi; - sì, credo proprio che tu sia ben fornita; ma io sono molto affezionata a Mrs C. Cage, per buone ragioni. Grazie per aver menzionato le sue lodi a Emma ecc. (7) - Ho contribuito a mettere le cifre alle camicie di Zio H., e ora sono a imperitura memoria delle tenere cure di molte. - Venerdì. Non avevo idea quando ho iniziato ieri questa lettera, di spedirla prima che tuo Fratello tornasse, ma ho scritto le mie sciocche considerazioni con una tale velocità che non voglio tenerle più a lungo a fissarmi negli occhi. - Molto obbligata per le Quadriglie, che sto cominciando a ritenere abbastanza carine, anche se naturalmente sono molto inferiori ai Cotillons dei miei tempi. (8) - Sabato scorso Ben e Anna hanno fatto una passeggiata qui per sentire lo Zio Henry (9), e lei aveva un aspetto così grazioso, è stato un tale piacere vederla, così giovane, così in fiore, così innocente, come se non avesse mai avuto un Pensiero cattivo in Vita sua - eppure qualche ragione per supporre che l'abbia avuto c'è, se crediamo nella Dottrina del Peccato Originale, o se rammentiamo gli episodi di quando era una ragazzina. -

Spero che Lizzy possa avere il suo Spettacolo. Molto gentilmente organizzato per lei. Henry è ritenuto da tutti molto attraente, ma non bello come Edward. - Credo di poter dire che io preferisco la sua di faccia. - William ha un Aspetto eccellente, un bell'appetito e sembra perfettamente in salute. - In primavera avrete un bel po' di Distacchi a Godmersham, Tu risentirai di certo la partenza di tutti. Comunque è giustissimo. Ci sono molti buoni motivi per questo. - Povera Miss C. - Mi farà pena quando comincerà a capire da sola. - Le tue critiche alle Quadriglie mi hanno estremamente divertita. - Bella cosa, per una Signora irrimediabilmente legata a una sola Persona! - Dolce Fanny, non credere cose del genere su di te. - Non spargere nel Recinto della tua Immaginazione, una calunnia così maligna sul tuo intelletto. - Non parlare male del tuo Buonsenso, solo per Gratificare la tua Fantasia. - Il tuo è un Buonsenso, che merita un Trattamento più onorevole. - Tu non sei innamorata di lui. Non sei mai stata realmente innamorata di lui. - Con tanto affetto, tua

J. Austen

Oggi lo Zio H. e Miss Lloyd pranzano da Mr Digweed, il che ci mette in grado di invitare lo Zio e la Zia F.- a venire da noi per incontrare i Nipoti.



(1) Il 13 febbraio 1817 erano state introdotte nuove monete d'argento per rimpiazzare le vecchie, svalutate durante l'instabilità economica che era seguita alle guerre napoleoniche.

(2) In realtà James-Beckford Wildman a Fanny Knight si sposeranno entrambi nel 1820, ma non tra di loro: il primo con Mary-Anne Lushington, e la seconda con Sir Edward Knatchbull, un vedovo con sei figli di dodici anni più vecchio di lei.

(3) John-Pemberton Plumptre (vedi le lettere 109 e 114).

(4) Henry e William Knight in quei giorni erano a Chawton, insieme a uno dei loro cugini Deedes (i Deedes ebbero diciannove figli, dieci dei quali maschi). I più vicini di età ai due fratelli Knight erano William e Julius, nati rispettivamente nel 1796 e nel 1798; se si trattava di William la frase che contiene due volte il nome "William" si potrebbe anche intendere come: "e a William [Deedes]voglio davvero molto bene, e così tutte noi, è proprio come il nostro William [Knight]."

(5) Ovviamente qui JA sta facendo dell'ironia sulle loro limitate risorse economiche: cinquanta sterline erano una somma assolutamente sproporzionata da regalare a un ragazzo.

(6) Marianne, nata in quell'anno, era la diciottesima; i Deedes si fermarono l'anno dopo, con la nascita di Emily.

(7) JA trascrisse il giudizio di Mrs Cage, inviato in una lettera a Fanny, nelle Opinions of Emma: "Tantissime grazie per avermi prestato Emma, che ho trovato delizioso. Mi piace più di tutti. Ogni personaggio è tratteggiato da cima a fondo. Devo concedermi il piacere di rileggerlo insieme a Charles [il marito]. Miss Bates è incomparabile, ma quei tesori mi fanno morire! Sono Unici, e davvero con più divertimento di quanto sia capace esprimere. Sono tutto il giorno a Highbury, e non posso fare a meno di sentire che ho appena fatto un nuovo giro di conoscenze. Nessuno scrive con tanto discernimento e in modo così accattivante."

(8) Fanny aveva evidentemente inviato alla zia degli spartiti di quadriglie, il ballo francese che era da poco diventato popolare in Inghilterra; "cotillons" era un termine usato genericamente per indicare i balli francesi, anche se di solito si riferiva ai vari tipi di contraddanze, non molto dissimili dalla quadriglia.

(9) I nipoti erano andati a sentire uno dei primi sermoni dello zio, nella sua nuova veste di curato di Chawton; vedi la nota 3 alla lettera 150(C).

152
(Wednesday 26 February 1817)
Caroline Austen, Steventon


You send me great News indeed my dear Caroline, about Mr Digweed Mr Trimmer, & a Grand Piano Forte. I wish it had been a small one, as then you might have pretended that Mr D.'s rooms were too damp to be fit for it, & offered to take charge of it at the Parsonage. - I am sorry to hear of Caroline Wiggetts being so ill. Mrs Chute I suppose would almost feel like a Mother in losing her. - We have but a poor account of your Uncle Charles 2d Girl; there is an idea now of her having Water in her head. The others are well. - William was mistaken when he told your Mama we did not mean to mourn for Mrs Motley Austen. Living here we thought it necessary to array ourselves in our old Black Gowns, because there is a line of Connection with the family through the Prowtings & Harrisons of Southampton. - I look forward to the 4 new Chapters with pleasure. - But how can you like Frederick better than Edgar? - You have some eccentric Tastes however I know, as to Heroes & Heroines. - Good bye.

Yrs affecly
J. Austen

Wed : Night.

Miss Caroline Austen

152
(mercoledì 26 febbraio 1817) (1)
Caroline Austen, Steventon


Mi mandi davvero grandi Notizie mia cara Caroline, circa Mr Digweed Mr Trimmer e un Grande Pianoforte. Vorrei che fosse stato piccolo, così avresti potuto far credere che la stanza di Mr D. fosse troppo umida per essere adatta, e offrirti di trovargli posto alla Canonica. - Mi dispiace di sentire che Caroline Wiggetts sta così male. Immagino che Mrs Chute sarebbe colpita quasi come una Madre nel perderla. (2) - Abbiamo solo brutte notizie della 2ª Figlia di tuo Zio Charles; ora c'è l'ipotesi che si tratti di Acqua in testa (3). Le altre stanno bene. - William si sbagliava quando ha detto alla tua Mamma che non avevamo intenzione di portare il lutto per Mrs Motley Austen. Vivendo qui abbiamo ritenuto necessario metterci i nostri vecchi Vestiti Neri, perché c'è una linea di Parentela con la famiglia attraverso i Prowting e gli Harrison di Southampton. (4) - Aspetto con impazienza il piacere di leggere i nuovi 4 Capitoli. - Ma come può piacerti più Frederick di Edgar? - Comunque lo so che hai Gusti un po' eccentrici, quanto a Eroi ed Eroine. - Arrivederci.

Con affetto, tua
J. Austen

Merc. Sera.



(1) Nell'edizione Chapman la lettera è datata "Wednesday 1817"; vedi: Deirdre Le Faye, "Jane Austen: Some letters Redated", in "Notes and Queries", n. 34(4), dic. 1987, pagg. 478-81.

(2) Caroline Wiggett era la figlia più giovane del rev. James Wiggett, cugino da parte materna di William-John Chute, che rimase vedovo con sette figli; gli Chute, nel 1803, avevano adottato Caroline.

(3) Il nome usato abitualmente per l'idrocefalia. Nella lettera successiva JA scriverà "Water on the brain" (Acqua nel cervello).

(4) John-Butler Harrison II aveva sposato Elizabeth-Matilda Austen, figlia di Henry (Harry) Austen, figlio di Thomas Austen, fratello di Francis Austen, il padre di Francis-Motley Austen, e di William Austen, il padre del rev. Austen. Per quanto riguarda William Prowting non ho rintracciato la linea di parentela. Elizabeth [Wilson] Austen era morta il 17 febbraio 1817.

153
(Thursday 13 March 1817)
Fanny Knight, Godmersham


Chawton, Thursday March 13.

As to making any adequate return for such a Letter as yours my dearest Fanny, it is absolutely impossible; if I were to labour at it all the rest of my Life & live to the age of Methuselah, I could never accomplish anything so long & so perfect; but I cannot let William go without a few Lines of acknowledgement & reply. I have pretty well done with Mr Wildman. By your description he cannot be in love with you, however he may try at it, & I could not wish the match unless there were a great deal of Love on his side. I do not know what to do about Jemima Branfill. What does her dancing away with so much spirit, mean? - that she does not care for him, or only wishes to appear not to care for him? - Who can understand a young Lady? - Poor Mrs C. Milles, that she should die on a wrong day at last, after being about it so long! - It was unlucky that the Goodnestone Party could not meet you, & I hope her friendly, obliging, social Spirit, which delighted in drawing People together, was not conscious of the division and disappointment she was occasioning. I am sorry & surprised that you speak of her as having little to leave, & must feel for Miss Milles, though she is Molly, if a material loss of Income is to attend her other loss. - Single Women have a dreadful propensity for being poor - which is one very strong argument in favour of Matrimony, but I need not dwell on such arguments with you, pretty Dear, you do not want inclination. - Well, I shall say, as I have often said before, Do not be in a hurry; depend upon it, the right Man will come at last; you will in the course of the next two or three years, meet with somebody more generally unexceptionable than anyone you have yet know, who will love you as warmly as ever He did, & who will so completely attach you, that you will feel you never really loved before. - And then, by not beginning the business of Mothering quite so early in life, you will be young in Constitution, spirits, figure & countenance, while Mrs Wm Hammond is growing old by confinements & nursing. Do none of the Plumptres ever come to Balls now? - You have never mentioned them as being at any? - And what do you hear of the Gipps? - or of Fanny and her Husband? - Mrs F. A. is to be confined the middle of April, & is by no means remarkably Large for her. - Aunt Cassandra walked to Wyards yesterday with Mrs Digweed. Anna has had a bad cold, looks pale, & we fear something else. - She has just weaned Julia. - How soon, the difference of temper in Children appears! - Jemima has a very irritable bad Temper (her Mother says so) - and Julia a very sweet one, always pleased & happy. - I hope as Anna is so early sensible of its' defects, that she will give Jemima's disposition the early & steady attention it must require. - I have also heard lately from your Aunt Harriot, & cannot understand their plans in parting with Miss S- whom she seems very much to value, now that Harriot & Eleanor are both of an age for a Governess to be so useful to; - especially as when Caroline was sent to School some years, Miss Bell was still retained, though the others were then mere Nursery Children. - They have some good reason I dare say, though I cannot penetrate it, & till I know what it is I shall invent a bad one, and amuse myself with accounting for the difference of measures by supposing Miss S. to be a superior sort of Woman, who has never stooped to recommend herself to the Master of the family by Flattery, as Miss Bell did. - I will answer your kind questions more than you expect. - Miss Catherine is put upon the Shelve for the present, and I do not know that she will ever come out; - but I have a something ready for Publication, which may perhaps appear about a twelvemonth hence. It is short, about the length of Catherine. - This is for yourself alone. Neither Mr Salusbury nor Mr Wildman are to know of it.

I am got tolerably well again, quite equal to walking about & enjoying the Air; & by sitting down & resting a good while between my Walks, I get exercise enough. - I have a scheme however for accomplishing more, as the weather grows springlike. I mean to take to riding the Donkey. It will be more independant & less troublesome than the use of the Carriage, & I shall be able to go about with At Cassandra in her walks to Alton and Wyards. -

I hope you will think Wm looking well. He was bilious the other day, and aunt Cass: supplied him with a Dose at his own request, which seemed to have good effect. - I was sure you would have approved it. Wm & I are the best of friends. I love him very much. - Everything is so natural about him, his affections, his Manners & his Drollery. - He entertains & interests us extremely. - -Max: Hammond and A. M. Shaw are people whom I cannot care for, in themselves, but I enter into their situation & am glad they are so happy. - If I were the Duchess of Richmond, I should be very miserable about my son's choice. What can be expected from a Paget, born & brought up in the centre of conjugal Infidelity & Divorces? - I will not be interested about Lady Caroline. I abhor all the race of Pagets. - Our fears increase for poor little Harriet; the latest account is that Sir Ev: Home is confirmed in his opinion of there being Water on the brain. - I hope Heaven in its mercy will take her soon. Her poor Father will be quite worn out by his feelings for her. - He cannot spare Cassy at present, she is an occupation & a comfort to him.

Adeiu my dearest Fanny. - Nothing could be more delicious than your Letter; & the assurance of your feeling releived by writing it, made the pleasure perfect. - But how could it possibly be any new idea to you, that you have a great deal of Imagination? - You are all over Imagination. - The most astonishing part of your Character is, that with so much Imagination, so much flight of Mind, such unbounded Fancies, you should have such excellent Judgement in what you do! - Religious Principle I fancy must explain it. - Well, good bye & God bless you.

Yrs very affecly
J. Austen

Miss Knight
Godmersham Park

153
(giovedì 13 marzo 1817)
Fanny Knight, Godmersham


Chawton, giovedì 13 marzo.

Scrivere un qualsiasi riscontro adeguato a una Lettera come la tua mia carissima Fanny, è assolutamente impossibile; se mi mettessi a lavorarci per tutto il resto della mia Vita e vivessi fino all'età di Matusalemme, non potrei mai realizzare nulla di così lungo e così perfetto; ma non posso far andare via William senza qualche Rigo di ringraziamento e di risposta. Con Mr Wildman ho praticamente chiuso. (1) Da quanto descrivi lui non può essere innamorato di te, anche se forse cerca di esserlo, e io non posso augurarmi un matrimonio a meno che non ci sia un bel po' d'Amore da parte sua. Non so che cosa fare riguardo a Jemima Branfill. Che significa che si è tenuta lontana ballando con tanto brio? - che non le importa di lui, o solo che vuole far sembrare che non le importa di lui? - Chi riesce a capire una giovane donna? - Povera Mrs C. Milles, dover morire alla fine in un giorno sbagliato, dopo esserci andata vicino così a lungo! - È stata una sfortuna che il Gruppo di Goodnestone non abbia potuto incontrarti, e spero che il suo Animo così affabile, cortese ed espansivo, che gioiva nel mettere insieme le Persone, non sia stato consapevole della separazione e della delusione che stava provocando. Sono dispiaciuta e sorpresa nel sentirti dire che ha lasciato così poco, e dovrò provare compassione per Miss Milles, benché sia Molly, se una perdita concreta di Entrate si aggiungerà all'altra di perdita. - Le Donne nubili hanno una terribile propensione a essere povere - il che è un argomento molto forte in favore del Matrimonio, ma non ho bisogno di dilungarmi con te su argomenti del genere, Tesoro mio, l'inclinazione non ti manca. - Be', ti dirò, come ho già detto spesso, Non andare di fretta; abbi fiducia, l'Uomo giusto alla fine arriverà; nel corso dei prossimi due o tre anni, incontrerai qualcuno più unanimemente ineccepibile di chiunque tu abbia già conosciuto, che ti amerà con un ardore che Lui non ha mai avuto, e che ti affascinerà in modo così totale, da farti sembrare di non aver mai veramente amato prima. - E allora, non avendo cominciato a fare la Madre troppo presto, sarai ancora giovane nel Fisico, nel morale, nell'aspetto e nelle fattezze, mentre Mrs William Hammond si starà invecchiando a forza di parti e allattamento. Non viene più nessuno dei Plumptre ai Balli? - Non li hai più menzionati perché non ci sono mai stati? - E cosa sai dei Gipps - o di Fanny e suo Marito? - Mrs F. A. si prepara per il parto a metà aprile, e non è particolarmente Grossa trattandosi di lei. (2) - Ieri la Zia Cassandra ha fatto una passeggiata a Wyards con Mrs Digweed. Anna ha avuto un brutto raffreddore, è pallida, e temiamo qualcosa d'altro. - Ha appena svezzato Julia. (3) - Come emerge presto la differenza di carattere dei Bambini! - Jemima ha un brutto Carattere molto irritabile (così dice la Madre) - e Julia uno molto dolce, sempre felice e contenta. Visto che Anna è così consapevole dei suoi difetti, spero che dedichi al temperamento di Jemima l'attenzione immediata e costante che richiede. - Ultimamente ho anche avuto notizie da tua Zia Harriot, e non riesco a capire i loro progetti di separarsi da Miss S- che lei sembra apprezzare moltissimo, ora che Harriot e Eleanor hanno entrambe un'età in cui un'Istitutrice sarebbe molto utile; - soprattutto perché quando Caroline fu mandata a Scuola per alcuni anni, tennero ancora Miss Bell, anche se le altre erano solo Bambine piccole. - Posso presumere che abbiano qualche buona ragione, anche se non riesco a capire quale, e finché non la saprò me ne inventerò una cattiva, e mi divertirò a giustificare la differenza di trattamento supponendo che Miss S. sia un tipo di Donna superiore, che non si è mai piegata a ingraziarsi il Padrone di casa con l'Adulazione, come faceva Miss Bell. - Voglio rispondere alle tue cortesi domande più di quanto tu possa aspettarti. Miss Catherine per il momento l'ho messa da parte, e non so se la tirerò di nuovo fuori; - ma ho qualcosa pronto per la Pubblicazione, che potrebbe forse uscire nel giro di circa un anno. È breve, all'incirca la lunghezza di Catherine. (4) - Tienilo per te. Né Mr SalusburyMr Wildman debbono saperlo.

Io sto di nuovo discretamente bene, in grado di passeggiare qui intorno e di godermi l'Aria aperta; e mettendomi a sedere e riposando un bel po' tra le mie Passeggiate, faccio abbastanza esercizio. - Tuttavia ho in progetto di fare di più, non appena il tempo diventerà più primaverile. Ho intenzione di far viaggiare l'Asino. (5) Sarò più indipendente e darò meno disturbo che usando la Carrozza, e potrò andarmene in giro con la Zia Cassandra nelle sue passeggiate a Alton e a Wyards. -

Spero che troverai bene William. L'altro giorno aveva problemi di bile, e la Zia Cass. gli ha somministrato una Dose su sua richiesta, che è sembrata avere effetti positivi. - Ero certa che tu avresti approvato. William e io siamo grandi amici. Gli voglio molto bene. - Tutto è così spontaneo in lui, l'affetto, i Modi e i suoi Scherzi. - Ci fa tanta compagnia e ci coinvolge moltissimo. - Max. Hammond e A. M. Shaw sono persone che, di per sé, non mi interessano, ma mi immedesimo nella loro situazione e sono contenta che siano felici. - Se fossi la Duchessa di Richmond, sarei molto infelice per la scelta di mio figlio. Che cosa ci si può aspettare da una Paget, nata e cresciuta in mezzo a Infedeltà coniugali e Divorzi? - Non voglio interessarmi di Lady Caroline. Aborro tutta la razza dei Paget. (6) - Crescono i nostri timori per la povera piccola Harriet, le ultime notizie sono che Sir. Ev. Home ha confermato la sua diagnosi di Acqua nel cervello. (7) - Spero che il Cielo nella sua misericordia se la porti via presto. Il suo povero Padre finirà col consumarsi del tutto torturandosi per lei. - Al momento non può fare a meno di Cassy, per lui è un'occupazione e un conforto.

Adieu mia carissima Fanny. - Nulla avrebbe potuto essere più delizioso della tua Lettera; e l'assicurazione che scriverla ti abbia sollevato lo spirito, rende il piacere perfetto. - Ma come poteva essere possibile che per te fosse una novità, avere così tanta Immaginazione? - Tu sei tutta Immaginazione. - La parte più sorprendente del tuo Carattere è che, con così tanta Immaginazione, così tanti slanci della tua Mente, con una Fantasia talmente sconfinata, tu abbia una capacità di Giudizio così eccellente in ciò che fai! - Immagino che si possa spiegare con i tuoi Principi religiosi. - Be', arrivederci e che Dio ti benedica.

Con tanto affetto, tua
J. Austen



(1) Vedi la lettera 151.

(2) Il settimo degli undici figli di Frank Austen, una femmina: Elizabeth, nacque in effetti il 15 aprile.

(3) Evidentemente JA si riferisce a una possibile nuova gravidanza di Anna, che aveva già avuto due figlie a distanza di meno di un anno l'una dall'altra; nel caso, Anna dovrebbe aver abortito, visto che il terzo figlio (George-Benjamin-Austen) nascerà soltanto il 18 maggio 1818.

(4) Qui JA si riferisce ai due romanzi che usciranno postumi alla fine di quell'anno (datati 1818). Miss Catherine è Catherine Morland, la protagonista di Northanger Abbey, il romanzo che era stato venduto nel 1803 a Crosby con il titolo Susan e che, dopo essere stato ricomprato nel 1816 dall'editore, che non lo aveva mai pubblicato, fu sottoposto a una revisione cambiando il titolo in Catherine (il titolo con cui fu pubblicato è presumibilmente dovuto a Henry Austen, che curò i rapporti con l'editore Murray). L'opera pronta per la pubblicazione è Persuasion, pubblicato insieme al precedente in un'edizione di quattro volumi. Quest'ultimo romanzo era stato terminato nell'agosto dell'anno precedente, e in quel momento JA stava scrivendo Sanditon, che resterà incompiuto.

(5) Il calessino tirato da un asino che le Austen usavano a Chawton (vedi la nota 3 alla lettera 142).

(6) Il padre di Caroline Paget, Henry William Paget, 1° marchese di Anglesey, era scappato nel 1808 con Lady Charlotte Wellesley, cognata di Lord Wellington e moglie di Henry Wellesley, 1° barone Cowley di Wesley. I due divorziarono dai rispettivi coniugi e si sposarono nel 1810; inoltre, il fratello minore di Henry William Paget, Sir Arthur Paget, aveva sedotto nel 1808 Lady Augusta Fane Boringdon, e l'aveva sposata nel 1809, dopo il divorzio di quest'ultima, sei mesi prima della nascita del loro primo figlio. Caroline Paget era la figlia di Henry William Paget e della sua prima moglie, Caroline Elizabeth Villiers.

(7) Vedi la nota 3 alla lettera 152.

154
(Friday 14 March 1817)
Caroline Austen, Steventon


My dear Caroline

You will receive a message from me Tomorrow; & today you will receive the parcel itself; therefore I should not like to be in that Message's shoes, it will look so much like a fool. - I am glad to hear of your proceedings & improvements in the Gentleman Quack. There was a great deal of Spirit in the first part. Our objections to it You have heard, & I give your Authorship credit for bearing Criticism so well. - I hope Edwd is not idle. No matter what becomes of the Craven Exhibition provided he goes on with his Novel. In that, he will find his true fame & his true wealth. That will be the honourable Exhibition which no V. Chancellor can rob him of. - I have just recd nearly twenty pounds myself on the 2d Edit: of S & S-* which gives me this fine flow of Literary Ardour. -

Tell your Mama, I am very much obliged to her for the Ham she intends sending me, & that the Seacale will be extremely acceptable - is I should say, as we have got it already; - the future, relates only to our time of dressing it, which will not be till Uncles Henry & Frank can dine here together. - Do you know that Mary Jane went to Town with her Papa? - They were there last week from Monday to Saturday, & she was as happy as possible. She spent a day in Keppel St with Cassy; - & her Papa is sure that she must have walked 8 or 9 miles in a morng with him. Your Aunt F. spent the week with us, & one Child with her, - changed every day. - The Piano Forte's Duty, & will be happy to see you whenever you can come.

Yrs affecly
J. Austen

* Sense and Sensibility.

Chawton
March 14.

Miss Caroline Austen

154
(venerdì 14 marzo 1817)
Caroline Austen, Steventon


Mia cara Caroline

Riceverai un mio messaggio Domani; e oggi riceverai il pacchetto da solo; perciò non vorrei essere nei panni di quel Messaggio, farà proprio la figura dello stupido. - Sono contenta di sapere dei tuoi progressi e delle migliorie per il Gentiluomo Ciarlatano. C'era molto Spirito nella prima parte. Le nostre Obiezioni su questa parte le conosci, e rendo omaggio alla tua professionalità di Scrittrice per saper accettare le Critiche così bene. - Spero che Edward non stia in ozio. Non ha importanza come vada la Borsa di Studio Craven (1) a condizione che prosegua con il suo Romanzo. Con quello, troverà vera fama e vera ricchezza. Quella sarà l'onorevole Borsa di Studio di cui nessun Vice Cancelliere potrà derubarlo. - Io ho appena ricevuto quasi venti sterline per la 2ª Ediz. di S & S-* il che mi ispira questo fine impeto di Ardore Letterario. - (2)

Di' alla Mamma, che la ringrazio tantissimo per il Prosciutto che intende mandarmi, e che la Verza marina sarà estremamente ben accetta - è dovrei dire, visto che già l'abbiamo ricevuta; - il futuro - si riferisce solo al momento in cui la prepareremo, il che non sarà finché gli Zii Henry e Frank non potranno pranzare qui insieme. - Lo sai che Mary Jane è andata a Londra col suo Papà? - Sono stati lì la settimana scorsa da lunedì a sabato, e lei è stata contentissima. Ha passato una giornata a Keppel Street con Cassy; - e il suo Papà è sicuro che deve aver camminato insieme a lui per 8 o 9 miglia in una mattinata. Tua Zia F. ha passato la settimana con noi, e con lei un Figlio, - ogni giorno diverso. - Omaggi da parte del Pianoforte, che sarà felice di vederti in qualsiasi momento tu possa venire.

Con affetto, tua
J. Austen

* Sense and Sensibility. (3)

Chawton
14 marzo.



(1) James-Edward era andato a Oxford il giorno precedente per concorrere alla "Craven Exhibition" presso l'Exeter College, dove poi in effetti si iscrisse.

(2) JA registrò questa entrata in un foglietto che riepilogava i suoi guadagni letterari:


(da Jane Austen Fiction Manuscripts)

Profitti dei miei Romanzi, oltre alle 600 sterline in
Titoli della Marina al 5%
-----------------------------
Residuo della 1ª Ediz. di Mansfield Park,
rimasto a Henrietta St - marzo1816..............................13,,7-
Ricevute da Egerton, per la 2ª Ediz. di Sense & S-
                                                                     marzo 1816........12,,15-
21 feb. 1817 - Primi Profitti di Emma............................38,,18-
7 marzo 1817 - Da Egerton - 2ª Ediz. S & S...................19,,13-

I "Primi Profitti di Emma" sono in realtà la somma algebrica pagatale da Murray per i ricavi della prima edizione di Emma (221 sterline, 6 scellini e 4 pence) e le perdite per la seconda edizione di Mansfield Park (182 sterline, 8 scellini e 3 pence). Il totale dei guadagni letterari di JA nel corso della sua vita fu quindi pari a circa 685 sterline.

(3) Nota di JA.

155
(Sunday 23 - Tuesday 25 March 1817)
Fanny Knight, Godmersham


Chawton, Sunday March 23.

I am very much obliged to you my dearest Fanny for sending me Mr Wildman's conversation, I had great amusement in reading it, & I hope I am not affronted & do not think the worse of him for having a Brain so very different from mine, but my strongest sensation of all is astonishment at your being able to press him on the subject so perseveringly - and I agree with your Papa, that it was not fair. When he knows the truth he will be uncomfortable. - You are the oddest Creature! - Nervous enough in some respects, but in others perfectly without nerves! - Quite unrepulsible, hardened & impudent. Do not oblige him to read any more. - Have mercy on him, tell him the truth & make him an apology. - He & I should not in the least agree of course, in our ideas of Novels and Heroines; - pictures of perfection as you know make me sick & wicked - but there is some very good sense in what he says, & I particularly respect him for wishing to think well of all young Ladies; it shews an amiable & a delicate Mind. - And he deserves better treatment than to be obliged to read any more of my Works. - Do not be surprised at finding Uncle Henry acquainted with my having another ready for publication. I could not say No when he asked me, but he knows nothing more of it. - You will not like it, so you need not be impatient. You may perhaps like the Heroine, as she is almost too good for me. - Many thanks for your kind care for my health; I certainly have not been well for many weeks, and about a week ago I was very poorly, I have had a good deal of fever at times & indifferent nights, but am considerably better now, & recovering my Looks a little, which have been bad enough, black & white & every wrong colour. I must not depend upon being ever very blooming again. Sickness is a dangerous Indulgence at my time of Life. - Thank you for everything you tell me; - I do not feel worthy of it by anything I can say in return, but I assure You my pleasure in your Letters is quite as great as ever, & I am interested & amused just as you could wish me. If there is a Miss Marsden, I perceive whom she will marry. Eveng. - I was languid & dull & very bad company when I wrote the above; I am better now - to my own feelings at least - & wish I may be more agreable. - We are going to have Rain, & after that, very pleasant genial weather, which will exactly do for me, as my Saddle will then be completed - and air & exercise is what I want. - Indeed I shall be very glad when the Event at Scarlets is over, the expectation of it keeps us in a worry, your Grandmama especially; - She sits brooding over Evils which cannot be remedied & Conduct impossible to be understood. - Now, the reports from Keppel St are rather better; Little Harriet's headaches are abated, & Sir Ev:d is satisfied with the effect of the Mercury, & does not despair of a Cure. The Complaint I find is not considered Incurable nowadays, provided the Patient be young enough not to have the Head hardened. The Water in that case may be drawn off by Mercury. - But though this is a new idea to us, perhaps it may have been long familiar to you, through your friend Mr Scud: - I hope his high renown is maintained by driving away William's cough. Tell William that Triggs is as beautiful & condescending as ever, & was so good as to dine with us today, & tell him that I often play at Nines & think of him. - Anna has not a chance of escape; her husband called here the other day, & said she was pretty well but not equal to so long a walk; she must come in her Donkey Carriage. - Poor Animal, she will be worn out before she is thirty. - I am very sorry for her. - Mrs Clement too is in that way again. I am quite tired of so many Children. - Mrs Benn has a 13th. - The Papillons came back on friday night, but I have not seen them yet, as I do not venture to Church. I cannot hear however, but that they are the same Mr P. & his sister they used to be. She has engaged a new Maidservant in Mrs Calker's room, whom she means to make also Housekeeper under herself. - Old Philmore was buried yesterday, & I, by way of saying something to Triggs, observed that it had been a very handsome Funeral, but his manner of reply made me suppose that it was not generally esteemed so. I can only be sure of one part being very handsome, Triggs himself, walking behind in his Green Coat. - Mrs Philmore attended as cheif Mourner, in Bombasin, made very short, and flounced with Crape.

Tuesday. I have had various plans as to this Letter, but at last I have determined that Un:c Henry shall forward it from London. I want to see how Canterbury looks in the direction. - When once Uncl H. has left us I shall wish him with you. London is become a hateful place to him, & he is always depressed by the idea of it. - I hope he will be in time for your sick. I am sure he must do that part of his Duty as excellently as all the rest. He returned yesterday from Steventon, & was with us by breakfast, bringing Edward with him, only that Edwd staid to breakfast at Wyards. - We had a pleasant family-day, for the Altons dined with us; - the last visit of the kind probably, which she will be able to pay us for many a month; - Very well, to be able to do it so long, for she expects much about this day three weeks, & is generally very exact. - I hope your own Henry is in France & that you have heard from him. The Passage once over, he will feel all Happiness. - I took my 1st ride yesterday & liked it very much. I went up Mounters Lane, & round by where the new Cottages are to be, & found the exercise & everything very pleasant, and I had the advantage of agreable companions, as At Cass: & Edward walked by my side. - At Cass. is such an excellent Nurse, so assiduous & unwearied! - But you know all that already. - Very affecly Yours

J. Austen

Miss Knight
Godmersham Park
Canterbury

155
(domenica 23 - martedì 25 marzo 1817)
Fanny Knight, Godmersham


Chawton, domenica 23 marzo.

Ti sono molto obbligata mia carissima Fanny per avermi mandato la conversazione con Mr Wildman, mi sono molto divertita leggendola, e spero di non sentirmi offesa e di non pensare male di lui per avere un Cervello così diverso dal mio, ma la sensazione che prevale su tutte è lo sbalordimento per come sei stata capace di insistere sull'argomento con tanta perseveranza - e sono d'accordo col tuo Papà, che non è stato corretto. Quando saprà la verità si sentirà in imbarazzo. - Sei la Creatura più strana del mondo! - Per certi versi alquanto emotiva, ma per altri perfettamente controllata! - È impossibile resisterti, sei insistente e sfacciata. Non costringerlo a leggere altro. - Abbi pietà di lui, digli la verità e fagli le tue scuse. - Naturalmente lui e io non ci troveremmo mai d'accordo, sulle nostre idee circa Romanzi ed Eroine; - i ritratti della perfezione come sai mi danno la nausea e mi rendono perfida - ma c'è molto buonsenso in ciò che dice, e io lo rispetto in modo particolare per il suo desiderio di pensare bene di tutte le giovani donne; è segno di Animo cortese e delicato. - E merita un trattamento migliore che essere costretto a leggere altri miei Lavori. - Non sorprenderti se scoprirai che lo Zio Henry è a conoscenza che ne ho un altro pronto per la pubblicazione. (1) Non ho potuto dirgli di No quando me l'ha chiesto, ma non ne sa nulla di più. - Non ti piacerà, perciò non essere impaziente. Forse potrebbe piacerti l'Eroina, perché è quasi troppo buona per me. - Tante grazie per le gentili domande sulla mia salute; di sicuro non sono stata bene per parecchie settimane, e circa una settimana fa ero molto malmessa, ho avuto un bel po' di febbre a intervalli e brutte nottate, ma ora sto notevolmente meglio, e sto un po' recuperando il mio Aspetto, che è stato abbastanza brutto, nero e bianco e di tutti i colori sbagliati. Non devo pensare di poter mai essere di nuovo in fiore. La malattia è una Debolezza pericolosa alla mia età. - Grazie per tutto ciò che mi dici; - nulla di quello che potrei dire in cambio me ne farebbe sentire degna, ma ti assicuro che il piacere che provo per le tue Lettere è grande come sempre, e ne sono interessata e divertita esattamente come mi vorresti tu. Se c'è una Miss Marsden, intuisco chi sposerà. (2) Sera. - Sono stata una compagnia fiacca, sciocca e noiosa quando ho scritto quanto sopra; ora sto meglio - almeno secondo me - e vorrei poter essere più gradevole. - Avremo Pioggia, e dopo quella, un tempo mite e molto piacevole, ovvero esattamente ciò che fa per me, perché allora la mia Sella sarà completata - e l'aria aperta e l'esercizio è quello che mi ci vuole. - Sarò davvero molto contenta quando a Scarlets sarà tutto finito, (3) l'attesa ci tiene tutti in tensione, specialmente tua Nonna; - Se ne sta seduta rimuginando su mali senza rimedio e Comportamenti impossibili da comprendere. - Le notizie da Keppel Street ora sono alquanto migliori; i mal di testa della Piccola Harriet si sono ridotti, e Sir Everard è soddisfatto dell'effetto del Mercurio, e non dispera di poterla curare. Ho scoperto che al giorno d'oggi non è considerato un Disturbo incurabile, purché il Paziente sia giovane abbastanza da non avere il Cranio indurito. L'Acqua in questo caso può essere assorbita dal Mercurio. - Ma sebbene questa sia un'idea nuova per noi, forse a te sarà familiare da tempo, attraverso il tuo amico Mr Scud. - Spero che faccia onore alla sua chiara fama guarendo la tosse di William. Di' a William che Triggs è bello e disponibile come sempre, e che oggi è stato così buono da pranzare con noi, e digli che spesso gioco a Nines (4) e lo penso. - Anna non ha via di scampo; (5) il marito ci ha fatto visita l'altro giorno, e ha detto che stava abbastanza bene ma non se la sentiva di fare una passeggiata così lunga; deve venire col suo Calessino trainato dall'asino. - Povero Animale, si sarà consumata prima dei trent'anni. - Mi dispiace molto per lei. - Anche Mrs Clement è di nuovo su quella strada. Sono proprio stanca di tutti questi Bambini. - Mrs Benn è arrivata a 13. - I Papillon sono tornati venerdì sera, ma non li ho ancora visti, dato che non mi avventuro in Chiesa. Non so altro tuttavia, se non che sono lo stesso Mr P e sorella di sempre. Lei ha messo una nuova Cameriera nella stanza di Mrs Calker, e ha intenzione di farle fare anche la Governante alle sue dipendenze. - Il vecchio Philmore è stato seppellito ieri, e io, parlando del più e del meno con Triggs, ho osservato che era stato un Funerale molto bello, ma il tenore della sua risposta mi ha fatto supporre che non tutti lo avessero giudicato così. Quello di cui posso essere certa è solo che almeno una parte era bellissima, lo stesso Triggs, che seguiva nel suo Soprabito Verde. - Mrs Philmore ha partecipato come prima Dolente, in abito di Bambagina, molto corto, e con balze di Crespo.

Martedì. Ho fatto diversi progetti per questa lettera, ma alla fine ho deciso che lo Zio Henry la inoltrerà da Londra. Voglio vedere che effetto fa Canterbury nell'indirizzo. (6) - Una volta che lo Zio H. ci avrà lasciate il mio desiderio sarà di saperlo con voi. Per lui Londra è diventata un posto odioso, ed è sempre depresso all'idea di andarci. - Spero che arrivi in tempo per i tuoi malati. Sono sicura che farà questa parte dei suoi Doveri in modo eccellente come il resto. È tornato ieri da Steventon, portando con sé Edward, ed era con noi per la prima colazione, solo che Edward è andato a farla a Wyards. - Abbiamo avuto una piacevole giornata familiare, poiché gli Alton hanno pranzato con noi; - probabilmente l'ultima visita del genere, che lei sarà in grado di fare per parecchi mesi; - Bravissima, a essere in grado di farlo così a lungo, visto che se lo aspetta quasi sicuramente a tre settimane da oggi, e lei generalmente è molto precisa. (7) - Spero che il tuo Henry sia in Francia e che tu abbia avuto sue notizie. Una volta terminata la Traversata, si sentirà Felicissimo. - Ieri ho fatto la mia prima cavalcata e mi è piaciuta moltissimo. Sono salita per Mounters Lane, ho girato intorno al luogo dove ci saranno i nuovi Cottage, e ho trovato l'esercizio e tutto il resto molto gradevole, e ho avuto il vantaggio di una simpatica compagnia, dato che la Zia Cass. e Edward camminavano al mio fianco. - Zia Cass. è un'Infermiera talmente eccellente, così assidua e instancabile! - Ma tutto questo già lo sai. - Con tanto affetto, Tua

J. Austen



(1) Persuasion, che JA aveva terminato di scrivere nell'agosto 1816, dopo aver rivisto la parte finale.

(2) Non ho trovato riferimenti per Miss Marsden; nell'elenco dei nomi dell'edizione Chapman è indicata come "hypothetical".

(3) Da un momento all'altro ci si aspettava la morte di James Leigh-Perrot, fratello di Mrs Austen, che abitava a Scarlets, nel Berkshire.

(4) "Nines" era un solitario con le carte.

(5) Vedi la nota 3 alla lettera 153.

(6) L'indirizzo corretto per Godmersham era "Farenham", come JA aveva sempre fatto; stavolta invece aveva messo "Canterbury". Probabilmente spedendo le lettere via Canterbury la consegna era più veloce, anche se c'era da pagare un'affrancatura extra di un penny.

(7) In effetti la previsione fu rispettata alla lettera, visto che JA scriveva di martedì 25 marzo e Elizabeth Austen nacque esattamente dopo tre settimane, martedì 15 aprile 1817.

156
(Wednesday 26 March 1817)
Caroline Austen, Steventon


Chawton Wedy March 26

My dear Caroline

Pray make no apologies for writing to me often, I am always very happy to hear from you, & am sorry to think that opportunities for such a nice little economical Correspondence, are likely to fail now. But I hope we shall have Uncle Henry back again by the 1st Sunday in May. - I think you very much improved in your writing, & in the way to write a very pretty hand. I wish you could practise your fingering oftener. - Would not it be a good plan for you to go & live entirely at Mr Wm Digweed's? - He could not desire any other remuneration than the pleasure of hearing you practise. I like Frederick & Caroline better than I did, but must still prefer Edgar & Julia. - Julia is a warm-hearted, ingenuous, natural Girl, which I like her for; - but I know the word Natural is no recommendation to you. - Our last Letter from Keppel St was rather more chearful. - Harriet's headaches were a little releived, & Sir Ev: Hume does not despair of a cure. - He persists in thinking it Water on the Brain, but none of the others are convinced. - I am happy to say that your Uncle Charles speaks of himself as quite well. How very well Edward is looking! You can have nobody in your Neighbourhood to vie with him at all, except Mr Portal. - I have taken one ride on the Donkey & like it very much - & you must try to get me quiet, mild days, that I may be able to go out pretty constantly. - A great deal of Wind does not suit me, as I have still a tendency to Rheumatism. - In short I am a poor Honey at present. I will be better when you can come & see us. - [complimentary close and signature cut away]

Miss Caroline Austen

156
(mercoledì 26 marzo 1817)
Caroline Austen, Steventon


Chawton mercoledì 26 marzo

Mia cara Caroline

Ti prego di non scusarti per scrivermi spesso, sono sempre molto contenta di avere tue notizie, e mi dispiace pensare che le opportunità per una piccola corrispondenza così piacevole, ora probabilmente si interromperanno. Ma spero che avremo lo Zio Henry di ritorno per la 1ª domenica di maggio.  (1) - Ritengo che tu sia molto migliorata nello scrivere, e sulla strada di scrivere con una calligrafia alquanto graziosa. Vorrei che tu fossi in grado di esercitare le dita più spesso. - Non sarebbe un buon piano per te andare a vivere in permanenza da Mr W. Digweed? - Lui non chiederebbe altra ricompensa che il piacere di ascoltare i tuoi esercizi. Frederick e Caroline mi piacciono più di prima, ma preferisco ancora Edgar e Julia. - Julia è una Ragazza cordiale, ingenua e spontanea, e mi piace per questo; - ma so che la parola Spontanea non è raccomandabile per te. - L'ultima Lettera da Keppel Street era alquanto più confortante. - I mal di testa di Harriet si sono un po' attenuati, e Sir Ev. Hume non dispera di poterla curare. - Lui persiste nel ritenere che si tratti di Acqua nel Cervello, ma nessuno degli altri ne è convinto. - Sono felice di poter dire che tuo Zio Charles dice di stare benissimo. Che bell'aspetto che ha Edward! Dalle vostre parti non c'è nessuno che possa minimamente competere con lui, salvo Mr Portal. - Ho fatto una passeggiata sull'Asino e mi è piaciuta moltissimo - e devi cercare di procurarmi giornate tranquille e miti, affinché io possa uscire quasi sempre. - Troppo Vento non mi fa bene, dato che soffro ancora di Reumatismi. - In breve al momento sono un ben misero Tesoro. Voglio stare meglio per quando verrai a trovarci. - [chiusa e firma tagliate via]



(1) Henry Austen, ora pastore a Chawton, andava di frequente a Steventon per aiutare il fratello James, che in quel periodo non stava bene. Dato che Henry era andato a Londra, per recarsi poi a Godmersham (vedi la lettera precedente), questo canale si sarebbe interrotto per un po'.

157
(Sunday 6 April 1817)
Charles Austen, Londra


Chawton Sunday April 6.

My dearest Charles

Many thanks for your affectionate Letter. I was in your debt before, but I have really been too unwell the last fortnight to write anything that was not absolutely necessary. I have been suffering from a Bilious attack, attended with a good deal of fever. - A few days ago my complaint appeared removed, but I am ashamed to say that the shock of my Uncle's Will brought on a relapse, & I was so ill on friday & thought myself so likely to be worse that I could not but press for Cassandra's returning with Frank after the Funeral last night, which she of course did, & either her return, or my having seen Mr Curtis, or my Disorder's chusing to go away, have made me better this morning. I live upstairs however for the present & am coddled. I am the only one of the Legatees who has been so silly, but a weak Body must excuse weak Nerves. My Mother has born the forgetfulness of her extremely well; - her expectations for herself were never beyond the extreme of moderation, & she thinks with you that my Uncle always looked forward to surviving her. - She desires her best Love & many thanks for your kind feelings; and heartily wishes that her younger Childn had more, & all her Childn something immediately. My Aunt felt the value of Cassandras company so fully, & was so very kind to her, & is poor Woman! so miserable at present (for her affliction has very much increased since the first) that we feel more regard for her than we ever did before. It is impossible to be surprised at Miss Palmer's being ill, but we are truly sorry, & hope it may not continue. We congratulate you on Mrs P.'s recovery. - As for your poor little Harriet, I dare not be sanguine for her. Nothing can be kinder than Mrs Cooke's enquiries after you & her, in all her Letters, & there was no standing her affectionate way of speaking of your Countenance, after her seeing you. - God bless you all. Conclude me to be going on well, if you hear nothing to the contrary.-Yours Ever truely

J. A.

Tell dear Harriet that whenever she wants me in her service again, she must send a Hackney Chariot all the way for me, for I am not strong enough to travel any other way, & I hope Cassy will take care that it is a green one. I have forgotten to take a proper-edged sheet of Paper.

Captn C. J. Austen RN
22, Keppel St
Russell Sqre

157
(domenica 6 aprile 1817)
Charles Austen, Londra


Chawton domenica 6 aprile.

Mio carissimo Charles

Molte grazie per la tua affettuosa Lettera. Ero in debito con te già da prima, ma nelle ultime due settimane sono stata davvero troppo indisposta per scrivere nulla di più di quello che era strettamente necessario. Ho sofferto di un attacco Biliare, accompagnato da una forte febbre. - Qualche giorno fa i miei disturbi sembravano spariti, ma mi vergogno di dire che il colpo del Testamento dello Zio (1) ha provocato una ricaduta, e venerdì stavo talmente male e ritenevo talmente probabile un peggioramento che non ho potuto fare altro che insistere per far tornare ieri sera Cassandra con Frank dopo il Funerale, cosa che naturalmente ha fatto, e sia stato il suo ritorno, o l'aver visto Mr Curtis, o il fatto che il Disturbo avesse deciso di andarsene, stamattina mi sento meglio. Per il momento comunque sto di sopra e mi faccio coccolare. Sono l'unica dei Legatari a essere stata così sciocca, ma un Fisico debole giustifica Nervi deboli. La Mamma ha sopportato estremamente bene di essere stata dimenticata; - le sue aspettative per se stessa non avevano mai superato i confini della moderazione, e ritiene come te che lo Zio avesse sempre pensato di sopravviverle. - Ti manda i suoi saluti più affettuosi e molti ringraziamenti per le tue gentili parole; e desiderava con tutto il cuore che i suoi Figli più giovani avessero potuto avere di più e tutti i suoi Figli qualcosa nell'immediato. La Zia ha apprezzato così tanto la compagnia di Cassandra, ed è stata talmente gentile con lei, ed è povera Donna! così disperata in questo momento (perché il suo dolore è cresciuto rispetto all'inizio) che proviamo più stima per lei di quanta ne avessimo mai provata prima. È impossibile essere sorpresi dal fatto che Miss Palmer sia malata, ma siamo sinceramente dispiaciuti, e speriamo che il disturbo non prosegua. Ci congratuliamo con te per la guarigione di Mrs P. - Quanto alla tua povera Harriet, non oso essere ottimista. Nulla può essere più gentile delle richieste di notizie di Mrs Cooke su di te e lei, in tutte le sue Lettere, e non c'è sosta nel suo affettuoso modo di parlare dell'espressione del tuo Viso, dopo averti visto. - Dio vi benedica tutti. Pensa pure che io continui a stare bene, se non hai notizie contrarie. Sempre sinceramente tua

J. A.

Di' alla cara Harriet, che se avrà di nuovo bisogno dei miei servigi, deve noleggiare un Cocchio per tutto il tragitto, perché non sono forte abbastanza per viaggiare in qualsiasi altro modo, e spero che Cassy faccia attenzione affinché sia verde. Mi sono scordata di prendere un foglio di Carta con i margini appropriati. (2)



(1) James Leigh-Perrot era morto a Scarlets il 28 marzo 1817, e il suo testamento era stato piuttosto deludente per la famiglia della sorella. L'intero patrimonio andava alla moglie fino alla sua morte, e solo dopo una parte dell'eredità sarebbe andata a James Austen o ai suoi eredi, mentre agli altri figli della sorella erano riservate mille sterline ciascuno, se in vita dopo la morte di Mrs. Leigh-Perrot. La delusione era accentuata dalle difficoltà finanziarie delle Austen, dato che, a seguito del fallimento della banca di Henry, sia lui che Frank non erano più stati in grado di versare alla madre le cinquanta sterline annue ciascuno per le quali si erano impegnati dopo la morte del padre; era inoltre ancora in corso la causa contro Edward che riguardava le proprietà di Chawton, anche questa preoccupante per i possibili contraccolpi economici.

(2) JA aveva scritto su un foglio di carta normale invece di uno di quelli con i margini neri usati in occasione di un lutto.

158
(Sunday 27 April 1817)
Will & Testament


I Jane Austen of the Parish of Chawton do by this my last Will & Testament give and bequeath to my dearest Sister Cassandra Elizth every thing of which I may die possessed, or which may be hereafter due to me, subject to the payment of my Funeral Expences, & to a Legacy of £50. to my Brother Henry, & £50 to Mde Bigeon - which I request may be paid as soon as convenient. And I appoint my said dear Sister the Executrix of this my last Will & Testament.

Jane Austen

April 27, 1817.

My Will. -
To Miss Austen

158
(domenica 27 aprile 1817)
Ultime volontà e Testamento


Io Jane Austen della Parrocchia di Chawton esprimo in questo modo le mie Ultime volontà e Testamento e lascio in eredità alla mia carissima Sorella Cassandra Elizabeth ogni cosa in mio possesso alla mia morte, o che possa essere in seguito dovutami, salvo il pagamento delle Spese del mio Funerale, e un Legato di 50 sterline a mio Fratello Henry, e di 50 sterline a Madame Bigeon - che richiedo siano pagati non appena possibile. E nomino la mia suddetta cara Sorella Esecutrice delle mie Ultime volontà e Testamento.

Jane Austen

27 aprile 1817.

Le mie Ultime volontà. -
A Miss Austen

159
(Thursday 22 May 1817)
Anne Sharp, Doncaster


Chawton May 22d.

Your kind Letter my dearest Anne found me in bed, for inspite of my hopes & promises when I wrote to you I have since been very ill indeed. An attack of my sad complaint seized me within a few days afterwards - the most severe I ever had - & coming upon me after weeks of indisposition, it reduced me very low. I have kept my bed since the 13. of April, with only removals to a Sopha. Now, I am getting well again, & indeed have been gradually tho' slowly recovering my strength for the last three weeks. I can sit up in my bed & employ myself, as I am proving to you at this present moment, & really am equal to being out of bed, but that the posture is thought good for me. - How to do justice to the kindness of all my family during this illness, is quite beyond me! - Every dear Brother so affectionate & so anxious! - And as for my Sister! - Words must fail me in any attempt to describe what a Nurse she has been to me. Thank God! she does not seem the worse for it yet, & as there was never any Sitting-up necessary, I am willing to hope she has no after-fatigues to suffer from. I have so many alleviations & comforts to bless the Almighty for! - My head was always clear, & I had scarcely any pain; my cheif sufferings were from feverish nights, weakness and Languor. - This Discharge was on me for above a week, & as our Alton Apothy did not pretend to be able to cope with it, better advice was called in. Our nearest very good, is at Winchester, where there is a Hospital & capital Surgeons, & one of them attended me, & his applications gradually removed the Evil. - The consequence is, that instead of going to Town to put myself into the hands of some Physician as I shd otherwise have done, I am going to Winchester instead, for some weeks to see what Mr Lyford can do farther towards re-establishing me in tolerable health. - On Saty next, I am actually going thither - My dearest Cassandra with me I need hardly say - and as this is only two days off you will be convinced that I am now really a very genteel, portable sort of an Invalid. - The Journey is only 16 miles, we have comfortable Lodgings engaged for us by our kind friend Mrs Heathcote who resides in W. & are to have the accomodation of my elder Brother's Carriage which will be sent over from Steventon on purpose. Now, that's a sort of thing which Mrs J. Austen does in the kindest manner! - But still she is in the main not a liberal-minded Woman, & as to this reversionary Property's amending that part of her Character, expect it not my dear Anne; - too late, too late in the day; - & besides, the Property may not be theirs these ten years. My Aunt is very stout. - Mrs F. A. has had a much shorter confinement than I have - with a Baby to produce into the bargain. We were put to bed nearly at the same time, & she has been quite recovered this great while. - I hope you have not been visited with more illness my dear Anne, either in your own person or your Eliza's. - I must not attempt the pleasure of addressing her again, till my hand is stronger, but I prize the invitation to do so. - Beleive me, I was interested in all you wrote, though with all the Egotism of an Invalid I write only of myself. - Your Charity to the poor Woman I trust fails no more in effect, than I am sure it does in exertion. What an interest it must be to you all! & how gladly shd I contribute more than my good wishes, were it possible! - But how you are worried! Wherever Distress falls, you are expected to supply Comfort. Ly P-writing to you even from Paris for advice! - It is the Influence of Strength over Weakness indeed. - Galigai de Concini for ever & ever. - Adeiu. - Continue to direct to Chawton, the communication between the two places will be frequent. - I have not mentioned my dear Mother; she suffered much for me when I was at the worst, but is tolerably well. - Miss Lloyd too has been all kindness. In short, if I live to be an old Woman I must expect to wish I had died now, blessed in the tenderness of such a Family, & before I had survived either them or their affection. - You would have held the memory of your friend Jane too in tender regret I am sure. - But the Providence of God has restored me - & may I be more fit to appear before him when I am summoned, than I shd have been now! - Sick or Well, beleive me ever yr attached friend

J. Austen

Mrs Heathcote will be a great comfort, but we shall not have Miss Bigg, she being frisked off like half England, into Switzerland.

Miss Sharp
South Parade
Doncaster

159
(giovedì 22 maggio 1817)
Anne Sharp, Doncaster


Chawton 22 maggio.

La tua gentile Lettera mia carissima Anne mi ha trovata a letto, perché nonostante le mie speranze e promesse di quando ti ho scritto da allora sono stata davvero molto male. Un attacco del mio triste malanno mi ha colpita pochi giorni dopo - il più grave che abbia mai avuto - ed essendo arrivato dopo settimane di indisposizione, mi ha ridotta in uno stato pietoso. Sono rimasta confinata a letto dal 13 aprile, muovendomi solo per mettermi sul Divano. Ora, mi sto riprendendo, e nelle ultime tre settimane ho davvero recuperato le forze gradualmente anche se lentamente. Posso sedermi sul letto e fare qualcosa, come quello che sto facendo per te in questo momento, e in realtà sono in grado di lasciare il letto, ma a patto di trovare una posizione che possa andar bene per me. - Come rendere giustizia alla gentilezza di tutta la mia famiglia durante questa malattia, è del tutto fuori della mia portata! - Tutti i miei cari Fratelli così affettuosi e in ansia! - E poi mia Sorella! - Mi mancano le parole se tento di descrivere che Infermiera è stata per me. Grazie a Dio! non sembra che per ora ne abbia risentito, e dato che non è mai stato necessario Vegliarmi, voglio sperare che non debba soffrire delle conseguenze della stanchezza. Ho così tanti motivi di sollievo e conforto per i quali ringraziare l'Onnipotente! - Sono rimasta sempre lucida, e ho raramente avuto dolori; le mie sofferenze principali derivavano dalle febbri notturne, dalla debolezza e dalla Spossatezza. - Ne ho sopportato il Peso per una settimana circa, e dato che il nostro Farmacista di Alton non aveva la pretesa di venirne a capo, abbiamo richiesto un consiglio più autorevole. Il luogo migliore più vicino, è Winchester, dove c'è un Ospedale con Chirurghi eccellenti, e uno di loro mi ha assistita, e le sue cure hanno gradualmente debellato il Male. - La conseguenza è, che invece di andare a Londra per mettermi nelle mani di qualche Medico come altrimenti avrei dovuto fare, andremo invece a Winchester, per qualche settimana per vedere che cosa può fare ancora Mr Lyford per riportarmi a un discreto stato di salute. - Sabato prossimo infatti, andremo là - La mia carissima Cassandra con me non ho bisogno dirlo - e dato che mancano solo due giorni ti sarai convinta che ormai sono davvero una distintissima Invalida portatile. - Il Viaggio è di sole 16 miglia, abbiamo fissato un Alloggio confortevole tramite la nostra cortese amica Mrs Heathcote che abita a Winchester e avremo la comodità della Carrozza del mio Fratello maggiore che sarà mandata appositamente da Steventon. E sì, questo è il tipo di cosa per la quale Mrs J. Austen si dimostra più gentile! - Ma in generale non è una Donna di larghe vedute, e quanto al fatto che questa reversione della Proprietà corregga questa parte del suo Carattere, non aspettartelo mia cara Anne; - troppo tardi, troppo in là; - e inoltre, la Proprietà potrebbe non essere loro per altri dieci anni. (1) Mia Zia è molto forte. - Mrs F. A. è rimasta a letto meno di quanto ci sia stata io - con una Bambina da mettere al mondo per di più. (2) Ci siamo messe a letto quasi nello stesso momento, e lei è si è rimessa da un bel po'. - Spero che voi non abbiate avuto visite da qualche altra malattia mia cara Anne, sia tu che la tua Eliza. - Non devo tentare il piacere di scriverle di nuovo, finché la mia mano non sarà più forte, ma apprezzo l'invito a farlo. - Credimi, ho provato interesse per tutto ciò che hai scritto, anche se con tutto l'Egoismo di un'Invalida scrivo soltanto di me stessa. - Confido che la tua Carità verso quella povera Donna non manchi di avere più effetto, di quanto ne sono certa siano stati gli sforzi. Che interesse ci mettete tutti voi! e come sarei lieta di poter contribuire più dei miei migliori auguri, se fosse possibile! - Ma quanto ti dai da fare! Ovunque ci sia una Pena, ci si aspetta che tu fornisca Consolazione. Lady P- che ti scrive da Parigi per chiedere consigli! - È proprio l'influenza della Forza sulla Debolezza. - Galigai de Concini sempre e per sempre. (3) - Adieu. - Continua a indirizzare a Chawton, le comunicazioni tra i due luoghi saranno frequenti. - Non ho menzionato la mia cara Mamma; ha sofferto molto per me quando ero nello stato peggiore, ma sta discretamente bene. - Anche Miss Lloyd è stata tutta gentilezza. In breve, se vivrò fino a diventare vecchia devo aspettarmi di desiderare di essere morta adesso, benedetta dalla tenerezza di una Famiglia come questa, e prima di essere sopravvissuta a ciascuno di loro o al loro affetto. - Anche tu ne sono certa avresti serbato la memoria della tua amica Jane con tenero rimpianto. - Ma la provvidenza di Dio mi ha ridato la salute - e possa io essere più degna di apparire di fronte a lui quando sarò chiamata, di quanto lo sarei stata adesso! - Malata o Sana, credimi sempre la tua affezionata amica

J. Austen

Mrs Heathcote sarà di gran conforto, ma non avremo Miss Bigg, si è precipitata come mezza Inghilterra, in Svizzera.



(1) JA si riferisce al testamento dello zio James Leigh-Perrot (vedi la nota 1 alla lettera 157), che aveva lasciato le sue proprietà a James Austen, ma solo dopo la morte della moglie, che per ora era l'unica erede, e che morì quasi vent'anni dopo. La proprietà passo perciò all'erede di James, il figlio James-Edward, che aggiunse "Leigh" al proprio cognome.

(2) Elizabeth, figlia di Frank e Mary Austen, era nata il 15 aprile 1817.

(3) Leonora Dora Galigai (1568-1617) era dama di compagnia di Maria de' Medici e nel 1601 aveva sposato Concino Concini. Fu accusata di stregoneria e bruciata, dopo essere stata decapitata, l'8 luglio 1617. Voltaire, nel suo Essais sur le moeurs et l'esprit des nations (Saggio sui costumi e lo spirito delle nazioni, 1756 - cap. 175) riporta la sua risposta al giudice che le chiedeva quale incantesimo avesse applicato alla sua padrona: "Il mio incantesimo è stato il potere che le anime forti hanno sugli spiriti deboli". Chapman afferma che JA potrebbe aver letto questa frase in una lettera del 30 aprile 1752 di Lord Chesterfield [Philip Dormer Stanhope, quarto conte di Chesterfield, 1694-1773], o nel romanzo The Absentee di Maria Edgeworth (cap. III). Nella lettera di Lord Chesterfield si legge:
"Le menti forti hanno indubbiamente un ascendente su quelle deboli, come giustamente osservò Galigai Marachale d'Ancre quando, a disgrazia e disonore di quei tempi, fu giustiziata per aver dominato Maria de' Medici con arti magiche e stregoneria."
Nel romanzo di Maria Edgeworth:
"«Dall'incantesimo che le menti superiori lanciano sempre agli spiriti inferiori.» «Molto bello» disse la signora ridendo, «ma vecchio come l'epoca di Leonora de Galigai, citato un milione di volte. Ora ditemi qualcosa di nuovo e di appropriato, e più adatto ai giorni nostri.»".

160
(Tuesday 27 May 1817)
James Edward Austen, Oxford


Mrs Davids, College St Winton
Tuesday May 27. -

I know no better way my dearest Edward, of thanking you for your most affectionate concern for me during my illness, than by telling you myself as soon as possible that I continue to get better. - I will not boast of my handwriting; neither that, nor my face have yet recovered their proper beauty, but in other respects I am gaining strength very fast. I am now out of bed from 9 in the morng to 10 at night - upon the Sopha t'is true - but I eat my meals with Aunt Cass: in a rational way, & can employ myself, and walk from one room to another. - Mr Lyford says he will cure me, & if he fails I shall draw up a Memorial and lay it before the Dean & Chapter, & have no doubt of redress from that Pious, Learned, and disinterested Body. - Our Lodgings are very comfortable. We have a neat little Drawg-room with a Bow-window overlooking Dr Gabell's garden. Thanks to the kindness of your Father & Mother in sending me their Carriage, my Journey hither on Saturday was performed with very little fatigue, & had it been a fine day I think I shd have felt none, but it distressed me to see Uncle Henry & Wm K- who kindly attended us on horseback, riding in rain almost all the way. - We expect a visit from them tomorrow, & hope they will stay the night, and on Thursday, which is Confirmation & a Holiday, we are to get Charles out to breakfast. We have had but one visit yet from him poor fellow, as he is in Sickroom, but he hopes to be out tonight. -

We see Mrs Heathcote every day, & William is to call upon us soon. - God bless you my dear Edward. If ever you are ill, may you be as tenderly nursed as I have been, may the same Blessed alleviations of anxious, simpathizing friends be Yours, & may you possess - as I dare say you will - the greatest blessing of all, in the consciousness of not being unworthy of their Love. - I could not feel this. - Your very affec: Aunt

J. A.

Had I not engaged to write to you, you wd have heard again from your Aunt Martha, as she charged me to tell you with her best Love. -

J. E. Austen Esqr
Exeter College
Oxford

160
(martedì 27 maggio 1817)
James Edward Austen, Oxford


Presso Mrs David, College Street Winton
martedì 27 maggio. -

Non conosco modo migliore mio carissimo Edward, di ringraziarti per la tua affettuosissima preoccupazione per me durante la mia malattia, che dirti io stessa non appena possibile che continuo a migliorare. - Non posso vantarmi della mia calligrafia; né questa, né il mio viso hanno ancora recuperato la loro naturale bellezza, ma per altri versi sto guadagnando forza molto rapidamente. Ora sono fuori dal letto dalle 9 del mattino alle 10 di sera - sul Divano è vero - ma consumo i miei pasti con la Zia Cass. in modo razionale, posso fare qualcosa, e passeggiare da una stanza all'altra. Mr Lyford dice che mi guarirà, e se fallisce redigerò una Memoria e la presenterò al Decano e al Capitolo, e non ho dubbi sull'intervento di quel Corpo Pio, Dotto e disinteressato. - Il nostro Alloggio è molto confortevole. Abbiamo un lindo Salottino con un Bovindo che affaccia sul giardino del Dr Gabell. Grazie alla gentilezza di tuo Padre e tua Madre nel mandarmi la Carrozza, sabato il Viaggio fin qui si è svolto con pochissima fatica, e se fosse stata una bella giornata credo che non l'avrei sentita affatto, ma sono stata in pena vedendo lo Zio Henry e W. K- che ci hanno gentilmente scortate, cavalcare sotto la pioggia per quasi tutta la strada. - Domani aspettiamo una loro visita, e speriamo che restino per la notte, e giovedì, che è giorno di Cresima ed è Vacanza, Charles potrà venire a colazione. Finora è venuto a trovarci una sola volta poverino, perché è in Infermeria, ma stasera spera di poter uscire. -

Vediamo Mrs Heathcote tutti i giorni, e William verrà a trovarci presto. - Dio ti benedica mio caro Edward. Se mai ti dovessi ammalare, possa tu essere assistito teneramente come lo sono stata io, avere per Te lo stesso Benedetto sollievo di amici solleciti e comprensivi, e possa tu avere - come sono certa che avrai - la benedizione più grande di tutte, nella consapevolezza di non essere indegno del loro Amore. - Io non sono riuscita a sentirmi così. - Con tanto affetto Zia

J. A.

Se non mi fossi impegnata a scriverti, avresti avuto di nuovo notizie dalla Zia Martha, che mi ha incaricata di mandarti i suoi affettuosi saluti. -

161(C)
(?Wednesday 28/Thursday 29 May 1817) - no ms.
?Frances Tilson, ?London


. . . My attendant is encouraging, and talks of making me quite well. I live chiefly on the sofa, but am allowed to walk from one room to the other. I have been out once in a sedan-chair, and am to repeat it, and be promoted to a wheel-chair as the weather serves. On this subject I will only say further that my dearest sister, my tender, watchful, indefatigable nurse, has not been made ill by her exertions. As to what I owe to her, and to the anxious affection of all my beloved family on this occasion, I can only cry over it, and pray to God to bless them more and more.

. . . But I am getting too near complaint. It has been the appointment of God, however secondary causes may have operated. . . .

. . . You will find Captain---- a very respectable, well-meaning man, without much manner, his wife and sister all good humour and obligingness, and I hope (since the fashion allows it) with rather longer petticoats than last year.

161(C)
(mercoledì 28/giovedì 29 maggio 1817?) - no ms.
Frances Tilson?, Londra? (1)


[...] Chi mi assiste è incoraggiante, e parla di completa guarigione. Vivo principalmente sul divano, ma ho il permesso di passeggiare da una stanza all'altra. Sono uscita una volta in portantina, e lo rifarò, e sarò promossa alla sedia a rotelle non appena il tempo lo permetterà. Su questo argomento voglio solo ancora dire che la mia carissima sorella, la mia tenera, attenta, instancabile infermiera, non si è ammalata per le sue fatiche. Riguardo a quanto le devo, e all'ansioso affetto di tutta la mia amata famiglia in questa circostanza, posso solo piangere, e pregare Dio di benedirli sempre di più.

[...] Ma mi sto avvicinando troppo alle lamentele. È stata una decisione di Dio, anche se possono aver agito cause secondarie. [...]

[...] Troverete il Capitano----- (2) un uomo molto rispettabile e benintenzionato, senza molte moine, sua moglie e sua cognata tutte cordialità e cortesia, e spero (per quanto lo permetta la moda) con sottane un po' più lunghe dell'anno scorso.



(1) Si tratta di frammenti di una lettera, citati da Henry Austen nella "Biographical Notice of the Author" inserita nell'edizione di Northanger Abbey e Persuasion pubblicata alla fine del 1817. Henry Austen, dopo aver citato, parlando del destinatario come "un giovane parente", un brano della lettera 146 a James Edward Austen (quello in cui JA parla del "pezzetto di avorio largo due pollici...") scrive: "I rimanenti estratti sono da varie parti di una lettera scritta qualche settimana prima della sua morte." Nell'edizione Chapman la lettera è priva dell'indicazione del destinatario ed è datata "end of May? 1817". Per le ipotesi sulla data e sulla destinataria, vedi: Deirdre Le Faye, "Jane Austen: More Letters Redated", in "Notes and Queries", n. 38 (3), set. 1991, pagg. 306-8.

(2) Le Faye annota: "Henry Austen soppresse il nome in occasione della pubblicazione: si tratta probabilmente del Cap. Benjamin Clement, della Royal Navy, con sua moglie [Ann-Mary Prowting] e la cognata Miss Catherine-Ann Prowting."

  141-150      |     indice lettere     |     home page     |      Appendice