Jane Austen

Lettere 91-100
traduzione di Giuseppe Ierolli

  81-90      |     indice lettere     |     home page     |      101-110 

91
(Monday 11 - Tuesday 12 October 1813)
Cassandra Austen, Chawton


Godmersham Park Monday Octr. 11th.

My dearest Cassandra

You will have Edward's Letter tomorrow. He tells me that he did not send you any news to interfere with mine, but I do not think there is much for anybody to send at present. We had our dinner party on Wedy with the addition of Mrs & Miss Milles who were under a promise of dining here in their return from Eastwell whenever they paid their visit of duty there, & it happened to be paid on that day. - Both Mother & Daughter are much as I have always found them. - I like the Mother, 1st because she reminds me of Mrs Birch & 2dly because she is chearful & grateful for what she is at the age of 90 & upwards. - The day was pleasant enough. I sat by Mr Chisholme & we talked away at a great rate about nothing worth hearing. - It was a mistake as to the day of the Sherers going being fixed; they are ready but are waiting for Mr Paget's answer. - I enquired of Mrs Milles after Jemima Brydges & was quite greived to hear that she was obliged to leave Canty some months ago on account of her debts & is nobody knows where. - What an unprosperous Family! - On saturday soon after breakfast Mr J. P. left us for Norton Court. - I like him very much. - He gives me the idea of a very amiable young Man, only too diffident to be so agreable as he might be. - He was out the cheif of each morng with the other two - shooting & getting wet through. - Tomorrow we are to know whether he & a hundred young Ladies will come here for the Ball. - I do not much expect any. - The Deedes' cannot meet us, they have Engagements at home. I will finish the Deedes' by saying that they are not likely to come here till quite late in my stay - the very last week perhaps - & I do not expect to see the Moores at all. - They are not solicited till after Edward's return from Hampshire. Monday, Nov:r 15th is the day now fixed for our setting out. - Poor Basingstoke Races! - there seem to have been two particularly wretched days on purpose for them; - & Weyhill week does not begin much happier. - We were quite surprised by a Letter from Anna at Tollard Royal last Saturday - but perfectly approve her going & only regret they should all go so far, to stay so few days. We had Thunder & Lighteng here on Thursday morng between 5 & 7 - no very bad Thunder, but a great deal of Lightg. - It has given the commencement of a Season of wind & rain; & perhaps for the next 6 weeks we shall not have two dry days together. - Lizzy is very much obliged to you for your Letter & will answer it soon, but has so many things to do that it may be four or five days before she can. This is quite her own message, spoken in rather a desponding tone. - Your Letter gave pleasure to all of us, we had all the reading of it of course, I three times - as I undertook to the great releif of Lizzy, to read it to Sackree, & afterwards to Louisa. - Sackree does not at all approve of Mary Doe & her nuts - on the score of propriety rather than health. - She saw some signs of going after her in George & Henry, & thinks if you could give the girl a check, by rather reproving her for taking anything seriously about nuts which they said to her, it might be of use. - This, of course, is between our three discreet selves - a scene of triennial bliss. - Mrs Britton called here on Saturday. I never saw her before. She is a large, ungenteel Woman, with self-satisfied & would-be elegant manners. - We are certain of some visitors tomorrow; Edward Bridges comes for two nights in his way from Lenham to Ramsgate & brings a friend - name unknown - but supposed to be a Mr Harpur, a neighbouring Clergyman; & Mr. R. Mascall is to shoot with the young Men, which it is to be supposed will end in his staying dinner. - On Thursday, Mr Lushington MP. for Canterbury & Manager of the Lodge Hounds, dines here & stays the night. - He is cheifly Young Edward's acquaintance. - If I can, I will get a frank from him & write to you all the sooner. I suppose the Ashford Ball will furnish something. - As I wrote of my nephews with a little bitterness in my last, I think it particularly incumbent on me to do them justice now, & I have great pleasure in saying that they were both at the Sacrament yesterday. After having much praised or much blamed anybody, one is generally sensible of something just the reverse soon afterwards. Now, these two Boys who are out with the Foxhounds will come home & disgust me again by some habit of Luxury or some proof of sporting Mania - unless I keep it off by this prediction. - They amuse themselves very comfortably in the Eveng - by netting; they are each about a rabbit net, & sit as deedily to it, side by side, as any two Uncle Franks could do. - I am looking over Self Control again, & my opinion is confirmed of its' being an excellently-meant, elegantly-written Work, without anything of Nature or Probability in it. I declare I do not know whether Laura's passage down the American River, is not the most natural, possible, every-day thing she ever does. -

Tuesday. - Dear me! What is to become of me! Such a long Letter! - Two & forty Lines in the 2d Page. - Like Harriot Byron I ask, what am I to do with my Gratitude? - I can do nothing but thank you & go on. - A few of your enquiries I think, are replied to en avance. The name of F. Cage's Drawg Master is O'Neil. - We are exceedingly amused with your Shalden news - & your self reproach on the subject of Mrs Stockwell, made me laugh heartily. I rather wondered that Johncock, the only person in the room, could help laughing too. - I had not heard before of her having the Measles. Mrs H- & Alethea's staying till friday was quite new to me; a good plan however. - I cd not have settled it better myself, & am glad they found so much in the house to approve - and I hope they will ask Martha to visit them. - I admire the Sagacity & Taste of Charlotte Williams. Those large dark eyes always judge well. - I will compliment her, by naming a Heroine after her. - Edward has had all the particulars of the Building &c read to him twice over & seems very well satisfied; - a narrow door to the Pantry is the only subject of solicitude - it is certainly just the door which should not be narrow, on account of the Trays - but if a case of necessity, it must be borne. - I knew there was Sugar in the Tin, but had no idea of there being enough to last through your Company. All the better. - You ought not to think this new Loaf better than the other, because that was the first of 5 which all came together. Something of fancy perhaps, & something of Imagination. - Dear Mrs Digweed! - I cannot bear that she shd not be foolishly happy after a Ball. - I hope Miss Yates & her companions were all well the day after their arrival. - I am thoroughly rejoiced that Miss Benn has placed herself in Lodgings - tho' I hope they may not be long necessary. - No Letter from Charles yet. - Southey's Life of Nelson; - I am tired of Lives of Nelson, being that I never read any. I will read this however, if Frank is mentioned in it. - Here am I in Kent, with one Brother in the same County & another Brother's Wife, & see nothing of them - which seems unnatural - It will not last so for ever I trust. - I shd like to have Mrs F. A. & her Children here for a week - but not a syllable of that nature is ever breathed. - I wish her last visit had not been so long a one. - I wonder whether Mrs Tilson has ever lain-in. Mention it, if it ever comes to your knowledge, & we shall hear of it by the same post from Henry. Mr Rob. Mascall breakfasted here; he eats a great deal of Butter. - I dined upon Goose yesterday - which I hope will secure a good Sale of my 2d Edition. - Have you any Tomatas? - Fanny & I regale on them every day. - Disastrous Letters from the Plumptres & Oxendens. - Refusals everywhere - a Blank partout - & it is not quite certain whether we go or not; - something may depend upon the disposition of Uncle Edward when he comes - & upon what we hear at Chilham Castle this morng - for we are going to pay visits. We are going to each house at Chilham & to Mystole. I shall like seeing the Faggs. - I shall like it all, except that we are to set out so early that I have not time to write as I could wish. - Edwd Bridges's friend is a Mr Hawker I find, not Harpur. I would not have you sleep in such an Error for the World. My Brother desires his best Love & Thanks for all your Information. He hopes the roots of the old Beach have been dug away enough to allow a proper covering of Mould & Turf. - He is sorry for the necessity of buildg the new Coin - but hopes they will contrive that the Doorway should be of the usual width; - if it must be contracted on one side, by widening it on the other. - The appearance need not signify. - And he desires me to say that Your being at Chawton when he is, will be quite necessary. You cannot think it more indispensable than he does. He is very much obliged to you for your attention to everything. - Have you any idea of returning with him to Henrietta St & finishing your visit then? - Tell me your sweet little innocent Ideas. - Everything of Love & Kindness - proper and improper, must now suffice. -

Yrs very affecly J. Austen

[Addition at the top of. p. 1, in Fanny's hand]
My dearest At: Cass: - I have just asked At. Jane to let me write a little in her letter, but she does not like it so I wont. - good bye.

Miss Austen
Chawton
Alton
Hants

91
(lunedì 11 - martedì 12 ottobre 1813)
Cassandra Austen, Chawton


Godmersham Park lunedì 11 ott.

Mia carissima Cassandra

Domani avrai la Lettera di Edward. Mi ha detto di non averti mandato notizie che possano interferire con la mia, ma al momento non credo ci sia molto da dire per nessuno. Mercoledì sono venuti gli invitati al pranzo con l'aggiunta di Mrs e Miss Milles che avevano promesso di pranzare qui al loro ritorno da Eastwell quando fossero andati là in visita di cortesia, e la visita è capitata proprio quel giorno. - Sia la Madre che la Figlia le ho trovate esattamente come sempre. - La Madre mi piace, primo perché mi ricorda Mrs Birch e secondo perché è felice e grata di essere arrivata a 90 anni e oltre. - È stata una giornata abbastanza piacevole. Ero seduta accanto a Mr Chisholme e abbiamo chiacchierato a più non posso su nulla degno di nota. - C'è stato un malinteso circa il giorno fissato per la visita degli Sherer; erano pronti ma stavano aspettando la risposta di Mr Paget. - Ho chiesto a Mrs Milles notizie di Jemima Brydges e mi è dispiaciuto sapere che era stata costretta a lasciare Canterbury alcuni mesi fa a causa dei suoi debiti e che nessuno sa dove sia. - Che Famiglia sfortunata! - Sabato subito dopo colazione Mr J. P. è partito per Norton Court. - Mi piace moltissimo. - Mi ha dato l'idea di un Giovanotto molto simpatico, solo troppo schivo per piacere quanto meriterebbe. Tutte le mattine per la maggior parte del tempo è stato fuori con gli altri due - a caccia a e bagnarsi da capo a piedi. - Domani sapremo se lui e un centinaio di signorine verranno qui per il Ballo. - Io non ci credo molto. - I Deedes non possono venire, hanno un Impegno a casa loro. Concludo con i Deedes dicendo che non è probabile che vengano fino agli ultimi giorni in cui resterò qui - forse l'ultimissima settimana - e credo che non vedrò affatto i Moore. - Non sono invitati fino a dopo il ritorno di Edward dall'Hampshire. Lunedì 15 novembre è il giorno fissato per la nostra partenza. - Povere Corse di Basingstoke! - sembra fatto apposta che siano stati due giorni pessimi; - e la settimana di Weyhill non comincia sotto migliori auspici. (1) - Sabato scorso siamo rimasti molto sorpresi da una Lettera di Anna da Tollard Royal - ma approviamo incondizionatamente che ci sia andata e ci rammarichiamo soltanto che siano andati tutti così lontano, per starci così pochi giorni. Giovedì mattina tra le 5 e le 7 ci sono stati Tuoni e Fulmini - Tuoni non troppo forti ma Fulmini a volontà. - Hanno dato inizio a una Stagione di pioggia e vento; e forse per le prossime 6 settimane non ci saranno due giorni asciutti di seguito. - Lizzy ti ringrazia moltissimo per la Lettera e risponderà presto, ma ha così tante cose da fare che forse passeranno quattro o cinque giorni prima che possa riuscirci. Questo è tutto il suo messaggio, pronunciato con un tono piuttosto abbattuto. - La tua Lettera ha fatto piacere a tutti, naturalmente tutti l'abbiamo letta, io tre volte - dato che mi ero impegnata con grande sollievo di Lizzy, a leggerla a Sackree, e poi a Louisa. Sackree Non approva affatto Mary Doe e le sue noci - Per via dell'opportunità più che per la salute. - Ha notato in George e Henry alcuni indizi del fatto che l'abbiano presa di mira, e ritiene che se tu potessi parlarle, facendole capire di non prendere sul serio quello che le hanno detto sulle noci, potrebbe essere utile. - Questo, naturalmente, deve restare fra noi tre - un'immagine di trinitaria beatitudine. - Sabato è venuta Mrs Britton. - Non l'avevo mai vista prima. È una Donna grassa e volgare, piena di sé e con modi che pretendono di essere eleganti. - Domani avremo di sicuro altri ospiti; arriva Edward Bridges per due notti di ritorno da Lenham per Ramsgate e porterà un amico - nome sconosciuto - ma si presume che sia un certo Mr Harpur, un Pastore suo vicino; e Mr R. Mascall è a caccia con i Giovanotti, il che fa supporre che finiremo per averlo a pranzo. - Giovedì, Mr Lushington, Membro del Parlamento per Canterbury e Supervisore dei Lodge Hounds, (2) pranzerà qui e resterà per una notte. - È un conoscente soprattutto di Edward jr. - Se mi sarà possibile, mi procurerò da lui una franchigia postale e scriverò a voi tutti al più presto. Suppongo che il Ballo di Ashford servirà a qualcosa. - Dato che nella mia ultima Lettera ho parlato un po' aspramente dei miei nipoti, credo che ora sia mio dovere render loro giustizia, e mi fa molto piacere poter dire che ieri erano entrambi alla Funzione. Dopo aver molto lodato o molto biasimato qualcuno, si è generalmente sensibili a qualsiasi cosa sia in grado di dimostrare il contrario. E adesso che i due Ragazzi sono fuori per la caccia alla volpe torneranno a casa e mi deluderanno di nuovo con una lussuosa tenuta da cavallerizzo o manifestazioni di Mania per la caccia - salvo prova contraria. - La Sera si divertono molto - a fare reti; tutti e due ne stanno facendo una per i conigli, e siedono uno accanto all'altro con un impegno tale, che nemmeno due Zio Frank potrebbero eguagliarlo. (3) - Sto dando di nuovo un'occhiata a Self Control, (4) e confermo il mio giudizio sul fatto che sia un'Opera molto ben concepita e scritta con eleganza, senza nulla di Realistico o Plausibile. Non so se la discesa di Laura del Fiume Americano, sia la cosa più naturale, più probabile, più consueta che lei possa mai fare. -

Martedì. - Povera me! Che ne sarà di me! Una Lettera così lunga! - Quarantadue Righe in 2 Pagine. (5) - Come Harriot Byron chiedo, come dimostrare la mia gratitudine? - Non posso fare nulla se non ringraziarti e andare avanti. -  (6) A qualcuna delle tue domande credo di aver risposto en avance. Il nome dell'Insegnante di Disegno di F. Cage è O'Neil. - Le notizie che ci hai dato di Shalden ci hanno divertito moltissimo - e i rimproveri che ti fai riguardo a Mrs Stockwell mi hanno fatto ridere di cuore. Mi sarei molto meravigliata se Johncock, la sola persona nella stanza, avesse potuto trattenersi dal ridere anche lui. - Non avevo mai saputo che avesse il Morbillo. Che Mrs H- e Alethea si fermino fino a venerdì per me è una novità; comunque è una buona idea. - Io stessa non avrei potuto sistemare meglio la faccenda, e sono contenta che abbiano trovato la casa di loro gradimento - e spero che chiederanno a Martha di andarle a trovare. Ammiro la Perspicacia e il Buongusto di Charlotte Williams. Quegli occhioni scuri giudicano sempre bene. - Le farò omaggio, dando il suo nome a un'Eroina. (7) - Edward ha avuto tutti i particolari del Fabbricato ecc., glieli ho letti due volte, e sembra molto soddisfatto; - l'unico elemento di preoccupazione è la porta stretta della Dispensa - è proprio la porta che non dovrebbe essere stretta, per via dei Vassoi - ma se è proprio necessario, ci si passerà sopra. - Sapevo che c'era Zucchero nel Barattolo, ma non avevo idea che ce ne fosse abbastanza da durare per le Ospiti. Tanto meglio. - Non devi credere che questo nuovo Panetto sia meglio dell'altro, perché quello era il primo dei 5 che sono stati fatti insieme. Forse un po' di fantasia, un po' d'Immaginazione. - Cara Mrs Digweed! - Non riesco a sopportare che non sia scioccamente felice dopo un Ballo. - Spero che Miss Yates e compagnia stessero tutti bene il giorno dopo il loro arrivo. - Sono davvero felice che Miss Benn abbia trovato un Alloggio - anche se spero che non sia necessario per molto tempo. - Ancora nessuna Lettera da Charles. La Vita di Nelson di Southey; - sono stanca di Vite di Nelson, dato che non ne ho mai letta nessuna. Questa tuttavia la leggerò, se menziona Frank. (8) - Sono qui nel Kent, con un Fratello e la moglie di un altro Fratello nella stessa Contea, e non vedo nessuno dei due - il che sembra strano - Spero che non sarà così per sempre. - Mi piacerebbe avere Mrs F. A. e i suoi Figli qui per una settimana - ma non è stata pronunciata una parola in proposito. - Vorrei che la sua ultima visita non fosse stata così lunga. Mi chiedo se Mrs Tilson sia ancora in attesa. Dimmelo, se mai dovesse venire a tua conoscenza, e dovremmo saperlo da Henry con lo stesso giro di posta. (9) Mr Robert Mascall è stato a colazione qui; mangia una gran quantità di Burro. - Ieri ho mangiato Oca - il che spero assicurerà buone Vendite alla mia 2ª Edizione. (10) - Avete Pomodori? - Fanny e io ne gustiamo tutti i giorni. Lettere Catastrofiche dai Plumptre e dagli Oxenden. - Rifiuti da tutte le parti - Vuoto dappertutto - e non è affatto certo se andremo o no; - dipenderà anche dai desideri dello Zio Edward quando arriverà - e da quello che sapremo a Chilham Castle stamattina - perché ci andremo in visita. Andremo sia a Chilham che a Mystole. Mi farà piacere vedere i Fagg. - Mi farà piacere tutto, salvo che partiremo talmente presto che non avrò tempo di scrivere come avrei desiderato. - Ho scoperto che l'amico di Edward Bridges è un certo Mr Hawker, non Harpur. Non avrei voluto per tutto l'oro del Mondo che tu andassi a dormire con una tale erronea convinzione. Mio Fratello ti manda i suoi saluti più affettuosi e i Ringraziamenti per tutte le tue Informazioni. Spera che le radici della vecchia Cava di ghiaia siano state scavate abbastanza da permettere di coprirle convenientemente con Terriccio e Zolle. - Gli dispiace che sia stato necessario costruire il nuovo Spigolo portante - ma spera che faranno in modo di fare la Porta della larghezza solita; - se dovesse essere ristretta da un lato, potranno allargarla dall'altro. - L'aspetto non importa. - E vuole che ti dica che la Tua presenza a Chawton quando ci sarà lui, sarà per forza necessaria. Non puoi ritenerla più indispensabile di quanto faccia lui. Ti ringrazia molto per la tua attenzione a tutto. - Hai una qualche idea di tornare con lui a Henrietta Street e terminare là la tua visita? - Dimmi le tue piccole Idee innocenti. - Tutto ciò che è Affettuoso e Gentile - proprio e improprio, per ora basti. -

Con tanto affetto, tua J. Austen

[Aggiunta all'inizio di pag. 1, di mano di Fanny]
Mia carissima Zia Cass. - Ho appena chiesto a Zia Jane di farmi scrivere un po' nella sua lettera, ma non vuole così non lo faccio. (11) - arrivederci.



(1) A Weyhill, nell'Hampshire, c'era un'antica fiera agricola annuale che durava una settimana.

(2) Muta di cani per la caccia alla volpe.

(3) Frank Austen era famoso in famiglia per la sua passione per i piccoli lavori di artigianato. Nel museo del Chawton Cottage è conservata una scatola con le iniziali di JA, probabilmente intagliata dal fratello.

(4) Self-Control, a Novel (1810), di Mary Brunton (1778-1818).

(5) Chapman precisa: "Si tratta della lettera di Cassandra; la seconda pagina di quella di JA ha solo 36 righe."

(6) Samuel Richardson, Sir Charles Grandison, lettera 33: "Come potrò dimostrare la mia gratitudine! O miei cari, sono sopraffatta dalla gratitudine; posso solo esprimerla in silenzio di fronte a loro." (Harriot Byron, dopo che Sir Charles l'aveva salvata da un rapimento e la sorella di questi le aveva offerto rifugio.)

(7) L'unica eroina austeniana di nome Charlotte è quella dell'ultimo romanzo incompiuto: Sanditon; in effetti è una ragazza perspicace e di buongusto, ma non è detto che il suo nome derivi da questo impegno di tre anni prima.

(8) Robert Southey (1774-1843), Life of Nelson (1813). Le Faye annota: "Nelson scrisse in modo favorevole di Francis William Austen, che però non è menzionato nel testo di Southey."

(9) Vedi la nota 3 alla lettera 88.

(10) JA si riferisce a uno dei proverbi riportati in British Apollo (1708), I, 74: "That who eats Goose on Michael's Day, / Shan't Money lack, his Debits to pay" ("A chi mangia Oca a San Michele, / Non mancheranno Soldi, per pagare i Debiti"). Il giorno di San Michele era anticamente l'11 ottobre. La seconda edizione è quella di Sense and Sensibility.

(11) Le Faye annota: "Senza dubbio perché JA non voleva che Fanny leggesse quello che aveva scritto sui fratelli e sul suo ammiratore Mr Plumptre."

92
(Thursday 14 - Friday 15 October 1813)
Cassandra Austen, Chawton


Godmersham Park Thursday Oct. 14.

My dearest Cassandra

Now I will prepare for Mr Lushington, & as it will be wisest also to prepare for his not coming or my not getting a frank I shall write very close from the first & even leave room for the seal in the proper place. - When I have followed up my last with this, I shall feel somewhat less unworthy of you than the state of our Correspondence now requires. I left off in a great hurry to prepare for our morng visits - of course was ready a good deal the first, & need not have hurried so much - Fanny wore her new gown & cap. - I was surprised to find Mystole so pretty. The Ladies were at home; I was in luck, & saw Lady Fagg & all her five Daughters, with an old Mrs Hamilton from Canty & Mrs and Miss Chapman from Margate into the Bargain. - I never saw so plain a family, five sisters so very plain! - They are as plain as the Foresters or the Franfraddops or the Seagraves or the Rivers' excluding Sophy. - Miss Sally Fagg has a pretty figure, & that comprises all the good Looks of the family. - It was stupidish; Fanny did her part very well, but there was a lack of Talk altogether, & the three friends in the House only sat by & looked at us. - However Miss Chapman's name is Laura & she had a double flounce to her gown. - You really must get some flounces. Are not some of your large stock of white morng gowns just in a happy state for a flounce, too short? - Nobody at home at either House in Chilham. - Edward Bridges & his friend did not forget to arrive. The friend is a Mr Wigram, one of the three & twenty Children of a great rich mercantile Sir Robert Wigram, an old acquaintance of the Footes, but very recently known to Edwd B. - The history of his coming here, is that intending to go from Ramsgate to Brighton, Edw: B. persuaded him to take Lenham in his way, which gave him the convenience of Mr W.'s gig & the comfort of not being alone there; but probably thinking a few days of Gm would be the cheapest & pleasantest way of entertaining his friend & himself, offered a visit here, & here they stay till tomorrow. Mr W. is about 5 or 6 & 20, not ill-looking & not agreable. - He is certainly no addition. - A sort of cool, gentlemanlike manner, but very silent. - They say his name is Henry. A proof how unequally the gifts of Fortune are bestowed. - I have seen many a John & Thomas much more agreable. - We have got rid of Mr R. Mascall however; - I did not like him either. He talks too much & is conceited - besides having a vulgarly shaped mouth. He slept here on Tuesday; so that yesterday Fanny & I sat down to breakfast with six gentlemen to admire us. - We did not go to the Ball. - It was left to her to decide, & at last she determined against it. She knew that it would be a sacrifice on the part of her Father & Brothers if they went - & I hope it will prove that she has not sacrificed much. - It is not likely that there shd have been anybody there, whom she wd care for. - I was very glad to be spared the trouble of dressing & going & being weary before it was half over, so my gown & my cap are still unworn. - It will appear at last perhaps that I might have done without either. - I produced my Brown Bombasin yesterday & it was very much admired indeed - & I like it better than ever: - You have given many particulars of the state of Chawton House, but still we want more. - Edward wants to be expressly told that all the Round Tower &c. is entirely down, & the door from the Best room stopt up; - he does not know enough of the appearance of things in that quarter. - He heard from Bath yesterday. Lady B. continues very well & Dr Parry's opinion is that while the Water agrees with her she ought to remain there, which throws their coming away at a greater Uncertainty than we had supposed. - It will end perhaps in a fit of the Gout which may prevent her coming away. - Louisa thinks her Mother's being so well may be quite as much oweing to her being so much out of doors, as to the Water. - Lady B. is going to try the Hot pump; the Cross Bath being about to be painted. - Louisa is particularly well herself, & thinks the Water has been of use to her. - She mentioned our enquiries &c. to Mr and Mrs Alex: Evelyn, & had their best Compts & Thanks to give in return. - Dr Parry does not expect Mr E. to last much longer. - Only think of Mrs Holder's being dead! - Poor woman, she has done the only thing in the World she could possibly do, to make one cease to abuse her. - Now, if you please, Hooper must have it in his power to do more by his Uncle. - Lucky for the little girl! - An Anne Ekins can hardly be so unfit for the care of a Child as a Mrs Holder. A letter from Wrotham yesterday, offering an early visit here; - & Mr & Mrs Moore & one Child are to come on Monday for 10 days. - I hope Charles & Fanny may not fix the same time - but if they come at all in October they must. What is the use of hoping? - The two parties of Children is the cheif Evil. To be sure, here we are, the very thing has happened, or rather worse, a Letter from Charles this very morng which gives us reason to suppose they may come here to day. It depends upon the weather, & the weather now is very fine. - No difficulties are made however & indeed there will be no want of room, but I wish there were no Wigrams & Lushingtons in the way to fill up the Table & make us such a motley set. - I cannot spare Mr Lushington either because of his frank, but Mr Wigram does no good to anybody. - I cannot imagine how a Man can have the impudence to come into a Family party for three days, where he is quite a stranger, unless he knows himself to be agreable on undoubted authority. - He & Edw. B. are going to ride to Eastwell - & as the Boys are hunting & my Br is gone to Canty Fanny & I have a quiet morng before us. - Edward has driven off poor Mrs Salkeld. - It was thought a good opportunity of doing something towards clearing the House. - By her own desire Mrs Fanny is to be put in the room next the Nursery, her Baby in a little bed by her; - & as Cassy is to have the Closet within & Betsey William's little Hole they will be all very snug together. - I shall be most happy to see dear Charles, & he will be as happy as he can with a cross Child or some such care pressing on him at the time. - I should be very happy in the idea of seeing little Cassy again too, did not I fear she wd disappoint me by some immediate disagreableness. - We had the good old original Brett & Toke calling here yesterday, separately. - Mr Toke I am always very fond of. He enquired after you & my Mother, which adds Esteem to Passion. - The Charles Cages are staying at Godington. - I knew they must be staying somewhere soon. - Ed: Hussey is warned out of Pett, & talks of fixing at Ramsgate. - Bad Taste! - He is very fond of the Sea however; - some Taste in that - & some Judgement too in fixing on Ramsgate, as being by the Sea. - The Comfort of the Billiard Table here is very great. - It draws all the Gentlemen to it whenever they are within, especially after dinner, so that my Br Fanny & I have the Library to ourselves in delightful quiet. - There is no truth in the report of G. Hatton being to marry Miss Wemyss. He desires it may be contradicted. - Have you done anything about our Present to Miss Benn? - I suppose she must have a bed at my Mothers whenever she dines there. - How will they manage as to inviting her when you are gone? - & if they invite how they will contrive to entertain her? - Let me know as many of your parting arrangements as you can, as to Wine &c. - I wonder whether the Ink bottle has been filled. - Does Butcher's meat keep up at the same price? and is not Bread lower than 2/6. - Mary's blue gown! - My Mother must be in agonies. - I have a great mind to have my blue gown dyed some time or other - I proposed it once to you & you made some objection, I forget what. - It is the fashion of flounces that gives it particular Expediency. - Mrs & Miss Wildman have just been here. Miss is very plain. I wish Lady B. may be returned before we leave Gm that Fanny may spend the time of her Father's absence, at Goodnestone, which is what she would prefer. - Friday. - They came last night at about 7. We had given them up, but I still expected them to come. Dessert was nearly over; - a better time for arriving than an hour & ½ earlier. They were late because they did not set out earlier & did not allow time enough. - Charles did not aim at more than reaching Sittingbourn by 3, which cd not have brought them here by dinner time. - They had a very rough passage, he wd not have ventured if he had known how bad it wd be. - However here they are safe & well, just like their own nice selves, Fanny looking as neat & white this morng as possible, & dear Charles all affectionate, placid, quiet, chearful good humour. They are both looking very well, but poor little Cassy is grow extremely thin & looks poorly. - I hope a week's Country air & exercise may do her good. I am sorry to say it can be but a week. - The Baby does not appear so large in proportion as she was, nor quite so pretty, but I have seen very little of her. - Cassy was too tired & bewildered just at first to seem to know anybody - We met them in the Hall, the Women & Girl part of us - but before we reached the Library she kissed me very affectionately - & has since seemed to recollect me in the same way. It was quite an eveng of confusion as you may suppose - at first we were all walking about from one part of the House to the other - then came a fresh dinner in the Breakfast room for Charles & his wife, which Fanny & I attended - then we moved into the Library, were joined by the Dining room people, were introduced & so forth. - & then we had Tea & Coffee which was not over till past 10. - Billiards again drew all the odd ones away, & Edwd Charles, the two Fannys & I sat snugly talking. I shall be glad to have our numbers a little reduced, & by the time You receive this we shall be only a family, tho' a large family party. Mr Lushington goes tomorrow. - Now I must speak of him - & I like him very much. I am sure he is clever & a Man of Taste. He got a vol. of Milton last night & spoke of it with Warmth. - He is quite an M.P. - very smiling, with an exceeding good address, & readiness of Language. - I am rather in love with him. - I dare say he is ambitious & Insincere. - He puts me in Mind of Mr Dundas -. He has a wide smiling mouth & very good teeth, & something the same complexion & nose. - He is a much shorter Man, with Martha's Leave. Does Martha never hear from Mrs Craven? - Is Mrs Craven never at home? - We breakfasted in the Dining room today & are now all pretty well dispersed & quiet. - Charles & George are gone out shooting together, to Winnigates & Seaton Wood - I asked on purpose to tell Henry. Mr Lushington & Edwd are gone some other way. - I wish Charles may kill something - but this high wind is against their Sport. - Lady Williams is living at the Rose at Sittingbourn, they called upon her Yesterday; she cannot live at Sheerness & as soon as she gets to Sittingbourn is quite well. - In return for all your Matches, I announce that her Brother William is going to marry a Miss Austen of a Wiltshire Family, who say they are related to us. - I talk to Cassy about Chawton; she remembers much but does not volunteer on the subject. - Poor little Love - I wish she were not so very Palmery - but it seems stronger than ever. - I never knew a Wife's family-features have such undue influence. - Papa & Mama have not yet made up their mind as to parting with her or not - The cheif, indeed the only difficulty with Mama is a very reasonable one, the Child's being very unwilling to leave them. When it was mentioned to her, she did not like the idea of it at all. - At the same time, she has been suffering so much lately from Sea sickness, that her Mama cannot bear to have her much on board this winter. - Charles is less inclined to part with her. - I do not know how it will end, or what is to determine it. He desires his best Love to you & has not written because he has not been able to decide. - They are both very sensible of your Kindness on the occasion. - I have made Charles furnish me with something to say about Young Kendall. - He is going on very well. When he first joined the Namur, my Br did not find him forward enough to be what they call put in the Office, & therefore placed him under the Schoolmaster, but he is very much improved, & goes into the Office now every afternoon - still attending School in the morng. This Cold weather comes very fortunately for Edward's nerves with such a House full, it suits him exactly, he is all alive & chearful. Poor James, on the contrary, must be running his Toes into the fire. I find that Mary Jane Fowle was very near returning with her Br & paying them a visit on board - I forget exactly what hindered her - I beleive their Cheltenham scheme - I am glad something did. - They are to go to Cheltenham on Monday se'night. I don't vouch for their going you know, it only comes from one of the Family. - Now I think I have written you a good sized Letter & may deserve whatever I can get in reply. - Infinities of Love. I must distinguish that of Fanny Sen:r - who particularly desires to be remembered to you all. - Yours very affecly J. Austen

Miss Austen
Chawton
Alton
Hants

92
(giovedì 14 - venerdì 15 ottobre 1813)
Cassandra Austen, Chawton


Godmersham Park giovedì 14 ott.

Mia carissima Cassandra

Sto preparando per Mr Lushington, e visto che sarà più saggio preparare anche se non dovesse venire o non riuscissi a procurarmi la franchigia postale scriverò molto stretto fin dall'inizio e lascerò pure lo spazio per il sigillo nel punto adatto. (1) - Quando avrò fatto seguito alla mia ultima lettera con questa, mi sentirò molto meno indegna di te rispetto all'attuale stato della nostra Corrispondenza. Mi ero interrotta di gran fretta per prepararmi alle nostre visite mattutine - naturalmente ero già pronta da un bel po', e non c'era bisogno di affrettarsi tanto - Fanny indossava il vestito e il cappellino nuovo. - Sono rimasta sorpresa nel trovare Mystole così bella. Le Signore erano in casa; io ero nel mio giorno fortunato, e ho visto Lady Fagg e tutte le sue cinque Figlie, con una signora anziana di Canterbury, Mrs Hamilton, e Mrs e Miss Chapman di Margate - Non ho mai visto una famiglia così brutta, cinque figlie tanto brutte! - Sono brutte come i Forester o i Franfraddops o i Seagrave o i Rivers eccetto Sophy. (2) - Miss Sally Fagg ha un personale grazioso, ed è tutto ciò che di bello ha la famiglia. - È stata una noia; Fanny ha interpretato bene la sua parte, ma c'era una totale mancanza di Argomenti, e le tre amiche che abbiamo trovato in Casa non hanno fatto altro che stare sedute ed esaminarci. - Comunque Miss Chapman si chiama Laura e aveva una doppia balza nel vestito. - Devi proprio procurarti qualche balza. Non hai nella tua ampia provvista di abiti bianchi da mattina qualche capo troppo corto, buono per una balza? - Nessuno in casa nelle altre due visite a Chilham. - Edward Bridges e il suo amico non si sono scordati di arrivare. L'amico è un certo Mr Wigram, uno dei ventitré Figli di un commerciante ricchissimo, Sir Robert Wigram, una vecchia conoscenza dei Foote, da poco diventato amico di Edward B. - La storia della sua venuta qui, è che avendo intenzione di andare da Ramsgate a Brighton, Edward B. lo ha convinto a passare per Lenham, cosa che gli ha permesso di approfittare del calesse di Mr W. e di non stare lì da solo; ma probabilmente ritenendo che qualche giorno a Godmersham sarebbe stato il modo più economico e piacevole di intrattenere il suo amico e lui stesso, gli ha offerto una visita qui, e qui resteranno fino a domani. Mr W. ha più o meno 25 o 26 anni, non si presenta male e non è simpatico. - Di certo non è un'aggiunta. - Modi freddi, da gentiluomo, ma molto silenzioso. - Dicono che si chiami Henry. Una prova di quanto siano diseguali i regali concessi dalla Sorte. (3) - Ho conosciuto diversi John e Thomas molto più simpatici. - Comunque ci siamo liberati di Mr R. Mascall; - non mi piaceva nemmeno lui. Parla troppo ed è pieno di sé - oltre ad avere una bocca disegnata in modo volgare. Ha dormito qui martedì; cosicché ieri io e Fanny ci siamo sedute a colazione con sei gentiluomini ad ammirarci. - Non andremo al Ballo. - Stava a lei decidere, e alla fine ha risolto di non andare. Sapeva che per il Padre e i Fratelli andarci sarebbe stato un sacrificio - e spero di appurare che lei non si è sacrificata molto. - Non è probabile che ci sia stato qualcuno a cui tiene. - Io sono stata molto contenta di essermi risparmiata il fastidio di vestirmi, andare e sentirmi stanca prima della metà della serata, e così il mio vestito e il mio cappellino sono ancora nuovi. - Alla fine verrà fuori che avrei potuto fare a meno di entrambi. - Ieri ho esibito il mio Bambagino Scuro, ed è stato davvero ammirato moltissimo - e mi piace più che mai. - Hai fornito molti particolari sullo stato di Chawton House, ma ancora non bastano. - Edward vuole che gli si dica esplicitamente che tutta la Round Tower è stata demolita, e la porta della stanza Grande è stata murata; - non ne sa abbastanza circa l'aspetto di quella parte della casa. - Ieri ha avuto notizie da Bath. Lady B. sta molto meglio e il parere del Dr Parry è che fino a quando le Acque e lei andranno d'accordo deve restare là, il che fa diventare la sua partenza molto più Incerta di quanto avevamo ipotizzato. - Forse finirà con un attacco di quella Gotta che potrebbe impedirle di partire. - Louisa ritiene che il buono stato di salute della Madre sia dovuto tanto al suo stare così spesso all'aperto, quanto alla cura delle Acque. - Lady B. sta andando alla Hot pump, dato che alla Cross Bath devono fare dei lavori. - La stessa Louisa sta particolarmente bene, e pensa che le Acque le siano state utili. Ha riportato il nostro interessamento a Mr e Mrs Alexander Evelyn, e ha ricevuto in cambio i loro Omaggi e i loro Ringraziamenti. - Il Dr Parry non si aspetta che Mr E. resista ancora a lungo. - Solo a pensare che Mrs Holder è morta! - Povera donna, ha fatto la sola cosa al Mondo che le fosse possibile fare, per finire di essere maltrattata. - Adesso, se dio vuole, Hooper può essere in grado di fare di più per lo Zio. - Una fortuna per la Ragazzina! - Una Anne Ekins difficilmente può essere inadatta a prendersi cura di una Bambina più di una Mrs Holder. - Ieri una lettera da Wrotham, che annunciava una visita imminente qui; - e Mr e Mrs Moore con uno dei Figli verranno lunedì per 10 giorni. - Spero che Charles e Fanny non scelgano lo stesso periodo - Ma in effetti se vengono a ottobre dovranno farlo. A che serve sperarlo? - I due gruppi di ragazzini sono il problema principale. Puoi giurarci, ecco fatto, è successo proprio questo, anzi peggio, proprio stamattina una Lettera di Charles che ci dà motivo di supporre che arriveranno oggi. Dipende dal tempo, e ora il tempo è bellissimo. - Tuttavia non ci saranno difficoltà e in effetti non ci sarà penuria di spazio, ma vorrei che non ci fossero i Wigram e i Lushington a riempire la Tavola e a trasformarci in un gruppo così eterogeneo. D'altronde non posso sacrificare Mr Lushington a causa della franchigia postale, ma Mr Wigram è un buono a nulla. - Non riesco a immaginare come una persona possa avere la sfacciataggine di infilarsi per tre giorni in una riunione di Famiglia, dove è completamente sconosciuto, a meno che non si ritenga gradito oltre ogni dubbio. - Lui e Edward B. stanno andando a fare una cavalcata a Eastwell - e dato che i Ragazzi sono a caccia e nostro Fratello è andato a Canterbury Fanny e io abbiamo di fronte una mattinata tranquilla. - Edward ha portato via la povera Mrs Salked. - È stata ritenuta una buona opportunità per fare qualcosa per sgombrare la Casa. - Su suo espresso desiderio Mrs Fanny sarà sistemata nella stanza vicino a quella dei bambini, con la Bimba in un lettino accanto a lei: - e dato che Cassy avrà lo Stanzino interno e Betsey il Buchetto di William staranno tutte ben strette insieme. - Sarò felicissima di vedere il caro Charles, e lui sarà felice quanto può circondato di Bambini e con le attenzioni che gli saranno rivolte. - Sarei felicissima anche di rivedere la piccola Cassy, se non avessi timore che mi possa deludere con un primo approccio negativo. - Ieri abbiamo ricevuto la visita della vecchia ditta Brett & Toke, separatamente. Per Mr Toke ho sempre un debole. Ha chiesto di te e della Mamma, il che ha aggiunto Stima alla Passione. - La famiglia di Charles Cage starà per un po' a Godington. - Lo sapevo che sarebbero presto andati a stare da qualche parte. Edward Hussey è stato sfrattato da Pett e parla di stabilirsi a Ramsgate. - Pessimo Gusto! - Comunque è molto amante del Mare; - in questo Gusto migliore - e anche un qualche Discernimento nello stabilirsi a Ramsgate, visto che è sul Mare. - La Comodità di avere qui una Sala da Biliardo è grandissima. - Attira tutti gli Uomini ogni volta che sono in casa, specialmente dopo pranzo, cosicché mio Fratello Fanny e io abbiamo la Biblioteca tutta per noi in piacevole tranquillità. - Non c'è nulla di vero nella notizia che G. Hatton stia per sposare Miss Wemyss. Lui vuole che sia smentita. - Hai fatto qualcosa per il nostro Regalo a Miss Benn? - Suppongo che avrà un letto dalla Mamma ogni volta che pranza là. - Come si organizzeranno per invitarla quando tu sarai partita? - e se la inviteranno come riusciranno a intrattenerla? - Fammi sapere tutto ciò che puoi sulla tua partenza, come sul Vino ecc. - Mi chiedo se la boccetta d'Inchiostro sia stata riempita. - La carne del Macellaio è sempre allo stesso prezzo? e si trova Pane a meno di 2 scellini e 4 pence? - Il vestito azzurro di Mary! - Per la Mamma dev'essere un tormento. - Ho proprio intenzione di far tingere il mio vestito azzurro un giorno o l'altro - una volta te l'ho proposto e tu hai sollevato qualche obiezione, non ricordo quale. - È la moda delle balze che lo rende particolarmente opportuno. - Mrs e Miss Wildman sono appena state qui. La signorina è molto ordinaria. Mi auguro che Lady B. torni prima della nostra partenza da Godmersham affinché Fanny possa trascorrere a Goodnestone il periodo di assenza del Padre, cosa che lei preferirebbe. - Venerdì. - Sono arrivati ieri sera alle 7. Ormai avevamo rinunciato, ma io li stavo ancora aspettando. Avevamo appena finito il Dessert; - meglio che se fossero arrivati un'ora e ½ prima. Avevano fatto tardi perché non si erano avviati di buon'ora e non avevano calcolato bene il tempo. - Charles non puntava a più che raggiungere Sittingbourn alle 3, il che non gli avrebbe permesso di arrivare qui per l'ora di pranzo. - La strada era pessima, e lui non si sarebbe avventurato se lo avesse saputo. - Comunque sono sani e salvi e in salute, proprio come è da loro, stamattina Fanny è ordinata e bianca per quanto possibile, e il caro Charles è tutto affetto, calma, tranquillità e allegro buon umore. Hanno entrambi un ottimo aspetto, ma la cara piccola Cassy è diventata estremamente magra e sembra un po' debole. - Spero che una settimana di aria di Campagna e un po' d'esercizio possano rinvigorirla. Mi dispiace che sia solo per una settimana. - La Bimba non sembra così grossa com'era, e nemmeno così graziosa, ma l'ho vista pochissimo. - Cassy era troppo stanca e confusa all'inizio per riconoscere qualcuno - Noi donne li abbiamo accolti nell'Atrio - ma prima che arrivassimo in Biblioteca mi ha baciata in modo molto affettuoso - e allo stesso modo da quel momento si è ricordata di me. È stata una serata molto movimentata come puoi immaginare - all'inizio eravamo tutti intenti a camminare su e giù da una parte all'altra della Casa - poi è stato servita una cena rapida nella sala della Colazione per Charles e la moglie, con Fanny e io presenti - poi siamo andati in Biblioteca, dove siamo stati raggiunti da quelli che erano in Sala da pranzo, ci sono state le presentazioni e così via. - E poi abbiamo preso Tè e Caffè e non abbiamo terminato prima delle 10. - I biliardi hanno di nuovo attirato tutti gli estranei, e Edward Charles, le due Fanny e io ci siamo seduti comodamente a chiacchierare. Sono contenta che si riduca un po' la compagnia, e quando riceverai questa lettera saremo solo una famiglia, anche se una famiglia allargata. Mr Lushington se ne va domani. - Adesso devo parlare di lui - e mi piace moltissimo. Sono certa che sia intelligente e un Uomo di Buongusto. Ieri sera ha preso un volume di Milton e ne ha parlato con Calore. - È proprio un Membro del Parlamento. - sempre col sorriso, estremamente garbato, e con la Lingua sciolta. - Sono quasi innamorata di lui. - Direi che è ambizioso e Ipocrita. - Mi ha fatto venire in mente Mr Dundas -. Ha una bocca larga e sorridente e denti molto belli, e lo stesso si può dire per la carnagione e il naso. - È molto basso, col Permesso di Martha. Martha non ha più avuto notizie di Mrs Craven? Mrs Craven non è mai a casa? - Oggi abbiamo fatto colazione in Sala da pranzo e ora siamo tutti graziosamente dispersi e tranquilli. - Charles e George sono andati a caccia insieme, a Winnigates e a Seaton Wood. - Ho chiesto col proposito di dirlo a Henry. Mr Lushington e Edward sono andati da qualche altra parte. - Mi auguro che Charles possa prendere qualcosa - ma questo vento forte è inadatto alla Caccia. - Lady Williams alloggia al Rose a Sittingbourn, Ieri sono andati a trovarla; non le piace Sheerness e non appena arrivata a Sittingbourn è stata subito bene. - In cambio di tutti i Vostri Matrimoni, vi annuncio che suo Fratello William si sta per sposare con una certa Miss Austen di una Famiglia del Wiltshire, che dice sia imparentata con noi. (4) - Ho parlato di Chawton con Cassy; si ricorda tutto ma non è molto disponibile su questo argomento. - Povero piccolo Amore - Avrei desiderato che non avesse preso dei Palmer - ma la somiglianza è più forte che mai. - Non sapevo che i lineamenti della famiglia di una Moglie potessero avere una tale indebita influenza. - Papà e Mamma non hanno ancora deciso se separarsi o no da lei - Il problema principale, in effetti la sola difficoltà ragionevole a parere della Mamma, è che la Bambina è molto riluttante a lasciarli. Quando gliene hanno parlato, non ha affatto gradito l'idea. - Allo stesso tempo, negli ultimi tempi ha talmente sofferto il mal di Mare, che la Mamma non vuole tenerla a bordo quest'inverno. - Charles è meno propenso a separarsene. - Non so come andrà a finire, o che cosa ne seguirà. Lui ti manda i suoi saluti più affettuosi e non ha scritto perché non è stato capace di decidersi. - Hanno apprezzato entrambi la tua Gentilezza in questa occasione. - Ho fatto sì che Charles mi fornisse qualcosa da dire circa il giovane Kendall. - Prosegue molto bene. Appena arrivato sulla Namur, nostro Fratello non l'ha giudicato abbastanza avanti per essere adatto al Compito che voleva assegnargli, e perciò lo ha affidato all'Insegnante di bordo, ma ora è molto migliorato, e svolge i suoi Compiti ogni pomeriggio - mentre la Mattina va ancora a Scuola. Questo Freddo arriva a proposito per i nervi di Edward con una Casa così piena, gli si adatta perfettamente, ed è vivace e allegro. Il povero James, al contrario, deve infilare i Piedi nel caminetto. Scopro che Mary Jane Fowle è stata molto vicina a rivedere il Fratello e a far loro visita a bordo - mi sono dimenticata che cos'è esattamente che gliel'ha impedito - credo il loro progetto per Cheltenham - sono lieta che qualcosa sia accaduto. - Lunedì della prossima settimana andranno a Cheltenham. Come sai non posso garantirtelo, è solo una notizia che viene da uno della Famiglia. - Ora credo di averti scritto una Lettera di proporzioni tali da meritarne qualunque altra io possa ricevere in risposta. - Un'infinità di saluti affettuosi. Devo distinguere quelli di Fanny sr. - che mi ha chiesto di essere particolarmente ricordata a tutte voi. - Con tanto affetto, tua J. Austen



(1) Mr Lushington, come membro del parlamento, aveva diritto alla franchigia postale e JA aveva accennato alla cosa nella lettera precedente.

(2) Molto probabilmente si tratta di quattro famiglie inesistenti; Le Faye ritiene che possano riferirsi a personaggi di brani giovanili di JA andati perduti.

(3) JA si riferisce al fratello Henry, che aveva un carattere opposto a quello di Mr Wigram.

(4) In realtà, il rev. Wapshare sposerà, nel novembre di quell'anno, Cooth-Ann Austen, figlia di William Austen, morto nel 1791, di Ensbury, nel Dorset e non nel Wiltshire; non sembra che questa famiglia fosse imparentata con quella di JA.

93
(Thursday 21 October 1813) - no ms.
Cassandra Austen, London


Godmersham Park Oct. 18

My dear Aunt Cassandra

I am very much obliged to you for your long letter and for the nice account of Chawton. We are all very glad to hear that the Adams are gone, and hope Dame Libscombe will be more happy now with her deaffy child, as she calls it, but I am afraid there is not much chance of her remaining long sole mistress of her house. I am sorry you had not any better news to send us of our hare, poor little thing! I thought it would not live long in that Pondy House; I don't wonder that Mary Doe is very sorry it is dead, because we promised her that if it was alive when we came back to Chawton, we would reward her for her trouble. Papa is much obliged to you for ordering the scrubby firs to be cut down; I think he was rather frightened at first about the great oak. Fanny quite believed it, for she exclaimed "Dear me, what a pity, how could they be so stupid!" I hope by this time they have put up some hurdles for the sheep, or turned out the cart-horses from the lawn. Pray tell grandmamma that we have begun getting seeds for her; I hope we shall be able to get her a nice collection, but I am afraid this wet weather is very much against them. How glad I am to hear she has had such good success with her chickens, but I wish there had been more bantams amongst them. I am very sorry to hear of poor Lizzie's fate. I must now tell you something about our poor people. I believe you know old Mary Croucher, she gets maderer and maderer every day. Aunt Jane has been to see her, but it was on one of her rational days. Poor Will Amos hopes your skewers are doing well; he has left his house in the poor Row, and lives in a barn at Builting. We asked him why he went away, and he said the fleas were so starved when he came back from Chawton that they all flew upon him and eenermost eat him up. How unlucky it is that the weather is so wet! Poor uncle Charles has come home half drowned every day. I don't think little Fanny is quite so pretty as she was; one reason is because she wears short petticoats, I believe. I hope Cook is better; she was very unwell the day we went away. Papa has given me half-a-dozen new pencils which are very good ones indeed; I draw every other day. I hope you go and whip Lucy Chalcraft every night. Miss Clewes begs me to give her very best respects to you; she is very much obliged to you for your kind enquiries after her. Pray give my duty to grandmamma and love to Miss Floyd. I remain, my dear aunt Cassandra, your very affectionate niece

Elizth. Knight

Thursday. I think Lizzy's letter will entertain you. Thank you for yours just received. To-morrow shall be fine if possible. You will be at Guildford before our party set off. They only go to Key Street, as Mr Street the Purser lives there, and they have promised to dine and sleep with him. Cassy's looks are much mended. She agrees pretty well with her cousins, but is not quite happy among them; they are too many and too boisterous for her. I have given her your message, but she said nothing, and did not look as if the idea of going to Chawton again was a pleasant one. They have Edward's carriage to Ospringe. I think I have just done a good deed - extracted Charles from his wife and children upstairs, and made him get ready to go out shooting, and not keep Mr Moore waiting any longer. Mr and Mrs Sherer and Joseph dined here yesterday very prettily. Edw. and Geo. were absent - gone for a night to Eastling. The two Fannies went to Canty. in the morning, and took Lou. and Cass. to try on new stays. Harriot and I had a comfortable walk together. She desires her best love to you and kind remembrance to Henry. Fanny's best love also. I fancy there is to be another party to Canty. to-morrow - Mr and Mrs Moore and me. Edward thanks Henry for his letter. We are most happy to hear he is so much better. I depend upon you for letting me know what he wishes as to my staying with him or not; you will be able to find out, I dare say. I had intended to beg you would bring one of my nightcaps with you, in case of my staying, but forgot it when I wrote on Tuesday. Edward is much concerned about his pond; he cannot now doubt the fact of its running out, which he was resolved to do as long as possible. I suppose my mother will like to have me write to her. I shall try at least. No; I have never seen the death of Mrs Crabbe. I have only just been making out from one of his prefaces that he probably was married. It is almost ridiculous. Poor woman! I will comfort him as well as I can, but I do not undertake to be good to her children. She had better not leave any. Edw. and Geo. set off this day week for Oxford. Our party will then be very small, as the Moores will be going about the same time. To enliven us, Fanny proposes spending a few days soon afterwards at Fredville. It will really be a good opportunity, as her father will have a companion. We shall all three go to Wrotham, but Edwd. and I stay only a night perhaps. Love to Mr Tilson.

Yours very affectionately, J. A.

Miss Austen
10 Henrietta St,
Covent Garden
London

93
(giovedì 21 ottobre 1813) - no ms.
Cassandra Austen, Londra


Godmersham Park 18 ott.

Mia cara Zia Cassandra

Ti ringrazio molto per la lunga lettera e per il bel resoconto di Chawton. Siamo tutti molto contenti di sapere che gli Adams sono partiti, e speriamo che la Signora Libscombe sarà più felice ora con la sua stramba bambina, come la chiama lei, ma temo che non ci siano molte possibilità per lei di restare a lungo la sola padrona della propria casa. Mi dispiace che tu non abbia potuto mandarci nessuna buona nuova della nostra lepre, poverina! Immaginavo che non sarebbe vissuta a lungo in quella Tana nello Stagno; non mi meraviglio che Mary Doe sia molto dispiaciuta della sua morte, perché le avevamo promesso che se fosse stata ancora viva quando saremmo tornati a Chawton, l'avremmo ricompensata per il disturbo. Papà ti ringrazia molto per aver fatto tagliare i rami dell'abete; penso che in un primo tempo fosse piuttosto allarmato per la grande quercia. Fanny ne era convinta, perché ha esclamato "Povera me, che peccato, come hanno potuto essere così stupidi!" Spero che a questo punto abbiano messo qualche ostacolo per le pecore, o tolto i cavalli da tiro dal prato. Per favore di' alla nonna che abbiamo cominciato a raccogliere i semi per lei; spero che riusciremo a procurargliene una bella collezione, ma temo che questa pioggia sia molto negativa per loro. Quanto sono contenta che abbia avuto così tanto successo con i polli, ma avrei voluto che ci fossero stati più galletti tra di loro. Mi dispiace molto di sentire del triste destino di Lizzie. Ora devo dirti qualcosa dei nostri poveri. Credo che tu conosca la vecchia Mary Croucher, diventa sempre più matta ogni giorno che passa. La zia Jane è stata a trovarla, ma era in uno dei suoi giorni sensati. Il povero Will Amos spera che i tuoi spiedi stiano funzionando bene; ha lasciato la sua casa diroccata, e vive in un fienile a Builting. Gli abbiamo chiesto perché se n'era andato, e ha detto che quando è tornato da Chawton le pulci erano talmente affamate che gli volavano tutte intorno e a momenti se lo mangiavano. Che sfortuna che il tempo sia così piovoso! Il povero zio Charles è tornato a casa tutti i giorni mezzo affogato. Non mi pare che la piccola Fanny sia graziosa come prima; uno dei motivi credo che sia il fatto di portare le gonnelle corte. Spero che la Cuoca stia meglio; stava molto male il giorno che ce ne siamo andati. Papà mi ha dato una mezza dozzina di matite nuove che sono davvero bellissime; disegno un giorno sì e un giorno no. Spero che tutte le sere tu vada a frustare Lucy Chalcraft. Miss Clewes mi prega di porgerti i suoi più sentiti ossequi; ti ringrazia molto per aver chiesto gentilmente di lei. Per favore porgi i miei omaggi alla nonna e a Miss Floyd. (1) Resto, mia cara zia Cassandra, la tua affezionatissima nipote

Elizth. Knight

Giovedì. Credo che la lettera di Lizzy ti divertirà. Grazie per la tua che ho appena ricevuto. Speriamo che domani sia bello. Sarai a Guildford prima che partano i nostri ospiti. Vanno solo fino a Key Street, perché Mr Street, il Commissario di bordo, abita là, e hanno promesso di pranzare e dormire da lui. L'aspetto di Cassy è molto migliorato. Si è trovata molto bene con i cugini, ma in mezzo a loro non è del tutto contenta; sono troppi e troppo turbolenti per lei. Le ho dato il tuo messaggio, ma non ha detto nulla, e non sembra che l'idea di venire di nuovo a Chawton le faccia piacere. Fino a Ospringe andranno con la carrozza di Edward. Credo di avere appena fatto una buona azione - aver sottratto Charles alla moglie e alle figlie di sopra, e avergli permesso di prepararsi per uscire a caccia, senza far aspettare oltre Mr Moore. Ieri Mr e Mrs Sherer e Joseph hanno molto graziosamente pranzato qui. Edw. e Geo. non c'erano - erano andati a Eastling per una notte. In mattinata, le due Fanny sono andate a Canterbury per provare dei nuovi corsetti di pizzo, e hanno portato Lou. e Cass.. Harriot e io abbiamo fatto una bella passeggiata. Manda a te i suoi saluti più affettuosi e a Henry i suoi gentili omaggi. Saluti affettuosi anche da Fanny. Domani immagino che ci sarà un altro gruppo per Canterbury. Mr e Mrs Moore e io. Edward ringrazia Henry per la sua lettera. Siamo felicissimi di sentire che sta molto meglio. Conto su di te per farmi sapere se vuole o no che io vada da lui, immagino che sarai in grado di scoprirlo. Avevo intenzione di pregarti di portare con te uno dei miei berretti da notte, nel caso dovessi andare, ma me ne sono dimenticata quando ti ho scritto martedì. Edward è molto preoccupato per il suo stagno; ora non ha dubbi sul fatto che vada prosciugato, cosa che aveva deciso di fare per quanto è possibile. Suppongo che alla mamma piacerebbe che io le scrivessi. Cercherò almeno di provarci. No; non ho saputo della morte di Mrs Crabbe. (2) Avevo solo intuito da una delle sue prefazioni che probabilmente era sposato. (3) È quasi assurdo. Povera donna! Consolerò lui per quanto potrò, ma non garantisco di essere buona con i figli di lei. Avrebbe fatto meglio a non lasciarne nessuno. (4) Edw. e Geo. partono tra una settimana per Oxford. A quel punto il nostro gruppo sarà molto esiguo, visto che i Moore se ne andranno più o meno nello stesso periodo. Per distrarci, Fanny propone di passare subito dopo qualche giorno a Fredville. Una prospettiva invitante, dato che il padre avrà compagnia. Andremo tutti e tre a Wrotham, ma Edward e io forse resteremo solo per una notte. Saluti affettuosi a Mr Tilson.

Con tanto affetto, tua J. A.



(1) Nelle Reminiscences di Caroline-Mary-Craven Austen (la figlia di James e di Mary Lloyd) si legge: "È stata mia nonna a cambiare la pronuncia di Lloyd in Floyd, così come ricordo di averla sempre sentita. Si diceva che questa fosse la giusta pronuncia gallese della doppia L, ma uno studioso gallese mi ha assicurato che è inutile cercare di imitare il loro accento, la lingua inglese non può renderlo, e perciò sarebbe meglio dire Lloyd." (Reminiscences of Caroline Austen, introduzione e note di Deirdre le Faye, Jane Austen Society, Chawton, 1986, pag. 10).

(2) Sarah Elmy, moglie di George Crabbe, uno dei poeti preferiti da JA, era morta il 21 settembre.

(3) JA si riferisce alla prefazione a The Borough, dove Crabbe fa un paragone tra l'amore per i propri scritti e quello per i figli.

(4) Qui naturalmente JA sta giocando con la sua "passione" per Crabbe, ben conosciuta in famiglia (vedi anche la nota 3 alla lettera 87).

94
(Tuesday 26 October 1813)
Cassandra Austen, London


Godmersham Park Tuesday Oct: 26.

My dearest Cassandra

You will have had such late accounts from this place as (I hope) to prevent your expecting a Letter from me immediately, as I really do not think I have wherewithal to fabricate one today. I suspect this will be brought to you by our nephews, tell me if it is. - It is a great pleasure to me to think of you with Henry, I am sure your time must pass most comfortably & I trust you are seeing improvement in him every day. - I shall be most happy to hear from you again. Your Saturday's Letter however was quite as long & as particular as I could expect. - I am not at all in a humour for writing; I must write on till I am. - I congratulate Mr Tilson & hope everything is going on well. Fanny & I depend upon knowing what the Child's name is to be, as soon as you can tell us. I guess Caroline. - Our Gentlemen are all gone to their Sittingbourne Meeting, East & West Kent in one Barouche together - rather - West Kent driving East Kent. - I beleive that is not the usual way of the County. We breakfasted before 9 & do not dine till ½ past 6 on the occasion, so I hope we three shall have a long Morning enough. - Mr Deedes & Sir Brook - I do not care for Sir Brook's being a Baronet I will put Mr Deedes first because I like him a great deal the best - they arrived together yesterday - for the Bridges' are staying at Sandling - just before dinner; - both Gentlemen much as they used to be, only growing a little older. They leave us tomorrow. - You were clear of Guildford by half an hour & were winding along the pleasant road to Ripley when the Charleses set off on friday. - I hope we shall have a visit from them at Chawton in the Spring or early part of the Summer. They seem well inclined. Cassy had recovered her Looks almost entirely, & I find they do not consider the Namur as disagreeing with her in general - only when the weather is so rough as to make her sick. - Our Canterbury scheme took place as proposed & very pleasant it was, Harriot & I and little George within, my Brother on the Box with the Master Coachman. - I was most happy to find my Br included in the party, it was a great improvement, & he & Harriot & I walked about together very happily, while Mr Moore took his little boy with him to Taylors & Haircutters. - Our cheif Business was to call on Mrs Milles, & we had indeed so little else to do that we were obliged to saunter about anywhere & go backwards & forwards as much as possible to make out the Time & keep ourselves from having two hours to sit with the good Lady. A most extraordinary circumstance in a Canterbury Morng! - Old Toke came in while we were paying our visit. I thought of Louisa. Miss Milles was queer as usual & provided us with plenty to laugh at. She undertook in three words to give us the history of Mrs Scudamore's reconciliation, & then talked on about it for half an hour, using such odd expressions & so foolishly minute that I could hardly keep my countenance. The death of Wyndham Knatchbull's son will rather supersede the Scudamores. I told her that he was to be buried at Hatch. - She had heard, with military Honours at Portsmouth. - We may guess how that point will be discussed, evening after evening. - Oweing to a difference of Clocks, the Coachman did not bring the Carriage so soon as he ought by half-an-hour; - anything like a breach of punctuality was a great offence - & Mr. Moore was very angry - which I was rather glad of - I wanted to see him angry - & though he spoke to his Servant in a very loud voice & with a good deal of heat I was happy to perceive that he did not scold Harriot at all. Indeed there is nothing to object to in his manners to her, & I do beleive that he makes her - or she makes herself - very happy. They do not spoil their Boy. - It seems now quite settled that we go to Wrotham on Saturday ye 13th, spend Sunday there, & proceed to London on Monday, as before intended. - I like the plan, I shall be glad to see Wrotham. - Harriot is quite as pleasant as ever; we are very comfortable together, & talk over our Nephews & Neices occasionally as may be supposed, & with much Unanimity - & I really like Mr. M. better than I expected - see less in him to dislike. -

I begin to perceive that you will have this Letter tomorrow. It is throwing a Letter away to send it by a visitor, there is never convenient time for reading it - & Visitor can tell most things as well. - I had thought with delight of saving you the postage - but Money is Dirt - If you do not regret the loss of Oxfordshire & Gloucestershire I will not - though I certainly had wished for your going very much. "Whatever is, is best." - There has been one infallible Pope in the World. - George Hatton called yesterday - & I saw him - saw him for ten minutes - sat in the same room with him - heard him talk - saw him Bow - & was not in raptures. - I discerned nothing extraordinary. - I should speak of him as a Gentlemanlike young Man - eh! bien tout est dit. We are expecting the Ladies of the family this morng. -

How do you like your flounce? - We have seen only plain flounces. I hope you have not cut off the train of your Bombasin. I cannot reconcile myself to giving them up as Morning gowns - they are so very sweet by Candle light. - I would rather sacrifice my Blue one for that purpose; - in short, I do not know, & I do not care. - Thursday or Friday are now mentioned from Bath as the day of setting off. The Oxford scheme is given up. - They will go directly to Harefield - Fanny does not go to Fredville, not yet at least. She has had a Letter of excuse from Mary Plumptre to day. The death of Mr Ripley, their uncle by marriage, & Mr P.'s very old friend, prevents their receiving her. - Poor Blind Mrs Ripley must be felt for, if there is any feeling to be had for Love or Money. We have had another of Edward Bridges' Sunday visits. - I think the pleasantest part of his married Life, must be the Dinners, & Breakfasts, & Luncheons & Billiards that he gets in this way at Gm. Poor Wretch! he is quite the Dregs of the Family as to Luck.

I long to know whether you are buying Stockings or what you are doing. Remember me most kindly to Mde B. & Mrs Perigord. - You will get acquainted with my friend Mr Philips & hear him talk from Books - & be sure to have something odd happen to you, see somebody that you do not expect, meet with some surprise or other, find some old friend sitting with Henry when you come into the room. - Do something clever in that way. - Edwd & I settled that you went to St Paul's Covent Garden, on Sunday. - Mrs Hill will come & see you - or else she wont come & see you, & will write instead. - I have had a late account from Steventon, & a baddish one, as far as Ben is concerned. - He has declined a Curacy (apparently highly eligible) which he might have secured against his taking orders - and, upon its' being made rather a serious question, says he has not made up his mind as to taking orders so early - & that if her Father makes a point of it, he must give Anna up rather than do what he does not approve. - He must be maddish. They are going on again, at present as before - but it cannot last. - Mary says that Anna is very unwilling to go to Chawton & will get home again as soon as she can. - Good bye. Accept this indifferent Letter & think it Long & Good. - Miss Clewes is better for some prescription of Mr Scudamores & indeed seems tolerably stout now. - I find time in the midst of Port & Madeira to think of the 14 Bottles of Mead very often. - Yours very affecly J. A.

Lady Elizabeth her second Daughter & the two Mrs Finches have just left us. - The two Latter friendly & talking & pleasant as usual.

Harriot & Fanny's best love.

Miss Austen
10, Henrietta Street
Covent Garden
London

94
(martedì 26 ottobre 1813)
Cassandra Austen, Londra


Godmersham Park martedì 26 ott.

Mia carissima Cassandra

Avrai avuto notizie così di recente da qui (spero) tali da non aspettarti una mia Lettera immediatamente, visto che non penso proprio di avere l'occorrente per fabbricarne una oggi. Presumo che questa ti sarà portata dai nostri nipoti, fammelo sapere. - Per me è un grandissimo piacere pensarti da Henry, sono certa che passerai il tuo tempo con molta tranquillità e confido che tu lo veda migliorare giorno per giorno. - Sarò molto felice di avere ancora notizie da te. La tua Lettera di sabato era comunque tanto lunga e particolareggiata quanto mi sarei potuta aspettare. - Non sono affatto dell'umore giusto per scrivere; scriverò quando lo sarò. - Faccio tanti auguri a Mr Tilson e spero che tutto stia andando bene. Fanny e io contiamo su di te per sapere il nome della Bimba, diccelo non appena puoi. Immagino Caroline. - I nostri Uomini sono tutti andati alla loro Riunione a Sittingbourne, il Kent Orientale e Occidentale nello stesso Calesse - o meglio - il Kent Occidentale portava quello Orientale. - Credo che non sia il solito modo di fare della Contea. Per l'occasione abbiamo fatto colazione prima delle 9 e non pranzeremo fino alle 6 e ½, così spero che noi tre avremo una Mattinata abbastanza lunga. - Mr Deedes e Sir Brook - non m'importa che Sir Brook sia un Baronetto e Mr Deedes lo metto per primo perché mi piace molto di più - sono arrivati insieme ieri - poco prima di pranzo - poiché i Bridges stanno a Sandling; - entrambi i Signori quasi come al solito, solo un po' invecchiati. Partono domani. - Tu avevi lasciato Guildford da mezzora e ti stavi addentrando lungo la bella strada per Ripley quando la famiglia di Charles è partita venerdì. - Spero che verranno da noi a Chawton in primavera o all'inizio dell'estate. Sembrano propensi a farlo. Cassy si è ripresa quasi del tutto, e credo che non ritengano che la Namur le sia nociva in generale - solo quando il tempo è così brutto da farla star male. - Il nostro piano per Canterbury si è svolto come previsto ed è stato molto piacevole, Harriot, io e George dentro, nostro Fratello a Cassetta con il Capo Cocchiere. Sono stata felicissima di scoprire che nostro Fratello era della compagnia, è stata un'ottima aggiunta, e lui, Harriot e io abbiamo fatto una bella passeggiata insieme, mentre Mr Moore ha portato il ragazzino con sé dal Sarto e dal Barbiere. - Il nostro Impegno principale era di far visita a Mrs Milles, e in effetti avevamo così poco altro da fare che siamo stati costretti a gironzolare senza meta e ad andare avanti e indietro il più possibile per far passare il Tempo ed evitare di dover stare per due ore in compagnia dell'amabile Signora. Una circostanza eccezionale per una Mattinata a Canterbury! - Il vecchio Toke è arrivato mentre stavamo facendo questa visita. Ho pensato a Louisa. Miss Milles è stata bizzarra come al solito e ci ha fornito lo spunto per un sacco di risate. Si era impegnata a raccontarci in due parole la storia della riconciliazione di Mrs Scudamore, e poi ha continuato a chiacchierarne per mezzora, usando espressioni così strane e così piene di inutili particolari che sono riuscita a malapena a restare seria. La morte del figlio di Wyndham Knatchbull ha poi soppiantato gli Scudamore. Le ho detto che sarebbe stato sepolto a Hatch. - Lei aveva sentito Portsmouth, con gli Onori militari. - Ci si può immaginare come questo punto sarà discusso, sera dopo sera. - A causa di una differenza negli Orologi, il Cocchiere ha tardato di una mezzora a portare la carrozza; - nulla come una violazione della puntualità poteva essere così offensivo - e Mr Moore era molto arrabbiato - il che mi fatto alquanto piacere - volevo vederlo arrabbiato - e benché parlasse al Servitore a voce altissima e molto accalorato sono stata contenta di notare che non incolpava affatto Harriot. In effetti non c'è nulla da dire nei suoi modi verso di lei, e credo che la renda - o che lei si senta - molto felice. Il Ragazzo non lo viziano. - Ora sembra definitivamente deciso che andremo a Wrotham sabato 13, passeremo lì la domenica, e proseguiremo lunedì per Londra, come si era stabilito in precedenza. - Il progetto mi piace, sarò lieta di vedere Wrotham. - Harriot è piacevole come sempre; stiamo molto bene insieme, e naturalmente parliamo ogni tanto dei nostri Nipoti, e ci troviamo molto d'accordo - in effetti Mr M. mi piace più di quanto mi aspettassi - in lui vedo meno cose da criticare. -

Comincio a intuire che questa Lettera l'avrai domani. Mandare una Lettera tramite un ospite è un po' come buttarla via, non c'è mai tempo sufficiente per leggerla - e l'Ospite può anche dire più cose. - Avevo pensato con piacere di risparmiarti l'affrancatura - ma cos'è il vile Denaro - Se tu non rimpiangi la perdita dell'Oxfordshire e del Gloucestershire nemmeno io lo farò - anche se avevo desiderato moltissimo che tu ci andassi. "Qualsiasi sia, è la migliore." (1) - C'è stato solo un Pope infallibile al Mondo. - Ieri è venuto George Hatton - e l'ho visto - l'ho visto per dieci minuti - seduta con lui nella stessa stanza - l'ho sentito parlare - l'ho visto Inchinarsi - e non sono andata in estasi. - Non ho percepito nulla di straordinario. - Direi che è un Giovanotto dai modi signorili - eh! bien tout est dit. Per stamattina aspettiamo le Signore della famiglia. -

Ti piace la tua balza? - Ne abbiamo viste solo di semplici. Spero che tu non abbia tagliato lo strascico del tuo Bambagino. Non riesco a rassegnarmi ad averci rinunciato per un abito da Mattina - sono così graziose a lume di Candela. - A questo scopo avrei preferito sacrificare quello Azzurro; - in breve, non lo so, e non m'importa. - Ora da Bath si parla di giovedì o venerdì come giorno di partenza. Il progetto per Oxford è stato abbandonato. - Andranno direttamente a Harefield - Fanny non andrà a Fredville, non subito almeno. Oggi ha ricevuto una lettera di scuse da Mary Plumptre. La morte di Mr Ripley, uno zio acquisito e vecchio amico di Mr. P., impedisce loro di riceverla. La povera e Cieca Mrs Ripley è da compatire, se c'è da avere un po' di compassione per l'Amore o il Denaro. Abbiamo avuto un'altra visita domenicale di Edward Bridges. - Credo che la parte più piacevole della sua Vita matrimoniale, siano le Cene, le Colazioni, i Pranzi e il Biliardo di cui gode a Godmersham lungo la strada. Poveretto! è proprio l'Ultimo della Famiglia quanto a Fortuna.

Vorrei tanto sapere se stai comprando le Calze o che cosa stai facendo. Salutami con la massima cortesia Madame B. e Mrs Perigord. - Farai conoscenza col mio amico Mr Philips e lo sentirai parlare di Libri - e fa sì che ti accada qualcosa di strano, che tu possa vedere qualcuno che non ti aspetti, imbatterti in una sorpresa o nell'altra, trovare qualche vecchio amico seduto accanto a Henry quando entri nella stanza. - In questo caso fai qualcosa di intelligente. - Edward e io abbiamo stabilito che domenica sei andata a St Paul a Covent Garden. - Mrs Hill verrà e ti vedrà - oppure non verrà e non ti vedrà e invece scriverà. - Ho avuto di recente una notizia da Steventon, e una notizia non buona, riguardante Ben. - Ha rifiutato una Curazia (apparentemente molto vantaggiosa) che l'avrebbe messo al sicuro una volta presi gli ordini - e, sul fatto che stia diventando una questione piuttosto seria, dice che non è intenzionato a prendere gli ordini così presto - e che se suo Padre ne fa una condizione essenziale, sarebbe pronto a rinunciare ad Anna piuttosto che fare qualcosa che non si sente di fare. - Dev'essere impazzito. Stanno insistendo ancora, adesso come prima - ma non può durare. - Mary dice che Anna è molto riluttante ad andare a Chawton e ritornerà a casa il più presto possibile. - Addio. Accetta questa Lettera mediocre e immagina che sia Lunga e Bella. - Miss Clewes sta meglio a seguito di alcune prescrizioni di Mr Scudamore e in effetti ora sembra discretamente in forze. - Trovo il tempo in mezzo a Porto e Madera di pensare molto spesso alle 14 Bottiglie di Idromele. - Con tanto affetto, tua J. A.

Lady Elizabeth la sua seconda Figlia e le due signore Finch se ne sono appena andate. Le ultime due affabili, chiacchierone e simpatiche come sempre.

Saluti affettuosi da Harriot e Fanny.



(1) Il riferimento è a Essay on Man, di Alexander Pope (Epistle I, x, 14): "Una verità è chiara, Qualsiasi sia, è giusta". Visto che "Pope" significa anche "Papa", la frase successiva può far pensare all'infallibilità del Papa, ma il dogma cattolico fu proclamato solo nel 1870.

95
(Wednesday 3 November 1813)
Cassandra Austen, London


Godmersham Park Wednesday Nov:er 3d.

My dearest Cassandra

I will keep this celebrated Birthday by writing to you, & as my pen seems inclined to write large I will put my Lines very close together. - I had but just time to enjoy your Letter yesterday before Edward & I set off in the Chair for Canty - & I allowed him to hear the cheif of it as we went along. We rejoice sincerely in Henry's gaining ground as he does, & hope there will be weather for him to get out every day this week, as the likeliest way of making him equal to what he plans for the next. - If he is tolerably well, the going into Oxfordshire will make him better, by making him happier. - Can it be, that I have not given you the minutiae of Edward's plans? - See here they are - To go to Wrotham on Saturday ye 13th, spend Sunday there, & be in Town on Monday to dinner, & if agreable to Henry, spend one whole day with him - which day is likely to be Tuesday, & so go down to Chawton on Wednesday. - But now, I cannot be quite easy without staying a little while with Henry, unless he wishes it otherwise; - his illness & the dull time of year together make me feel that it would be horrible of me not to offer to remain with him - & therefore, unless you know of any objection, I wish you would tell him with my best Love that I shall be most happy to spend 10 days or a fortnight in Henrietta St - if he will accept me. I do not offer more than a fortnight because I shall then have been some time from home, but it will be a great pleasure to be with him, as it always is. - I have the less regret & scruple on your account, because I shall see you for a day and a half, & because You will have Edward for at least a week. - My scheme is to take Bookham in my way home for a few days & my hope that Henry will be so good as to send me some part of the way thither. I have a most kind repetition of Mrs Cooke's two or three dozen Invitations, with the offer of meeting me anywhere in one of her airings. - Fanny's cold is much better. By dosing & keeping her room on Sunday, she got rid of the worst of it, but I am rather afraid of what this day may do for her; she is gone to Canty with Miss Clewes, Liz. & Ma. and it is but roughish weather for any one in a tender state. - Miss Clewes has been going to Canty ever since her return, & it is now just accomplishing. Edward & I had a delightful morng for our Drive there, I enjoyed it thoroughly, but the Day turned off before we were ready, & we came home in some rain & the apprehension of a great deal. It has not done us any harm however. - He went to inspect the Gaol, as a visiting Magistrate, & took me with him. - I was gratified - & went through all the feelings which People must go through I think in visiting such a Building. - We paid no other visits - only walked about snugly together & shopp'd. - I bought a Concert Ticket & a sprig of flowers for my old age. - To vary the subject from Gay to Grave with inimitable address I shall now tell you something of the Bath party - & still a Bath party they are, for a fit of the Gout came on last week. - The accounts of Lady B. are as good as can be under such a circumstance, Dr P. - says it appears a good sort of Gout, & her spirits are better than usual, but as to her coming away, it is of course all uncertainty. - I have very little doubt of Edward's going down to Bath, if they have not left it when he is in Hampshire; if he does, he will go on from Steventon, & then return direct to London, without coming back to Chawton. - This detention does not suit his feelings. - It may be rather a good thing however that Dr P. should see Lady B. with the Gout on her. Harriot was quite wishing for it. - The day seems to improve. I wish my pen would too. - Sweet Mr Ogle. I dare say he sees all the Panoramas for nothing, has free-admittance everywhere; he is so delightful! - Now, you need not see anybody else. - I am glad to hear of our being likely to have a peep at Charles & Fanny at Christmas, but do not force poor Cass. to stay if she hates it. - You have done very right as to Mrs F. A. - Your tidings of S & S. give me pleasure. I have never seen it advertised. - Harriot, in a Letter to Fanny today, enquires whether they sell Cloths for Pelisses at Bedford House - & if they do, will be very much obliged to you to desire them to send her down Patterns, with the Width & Prices - they may go from Charing Cross almost any day in the week - but if it is a ready money house it will not do, for the Bru of feu the Archbishop says she cannot pay for it immediately. - Fanny & I suspect they do not deal in the Article. - The Sherers I beleive are now really going to go, Joseph has had a Bed here the two last nights, & I do not know whether this is not the day of moving. Mrs Sherer called yesterday to take leave. The weather looks worse again. - We dine at Chilham Castle tomorrow, & I expect to find some amusement; but more from the Concert the next day, as I am sure of seeing several that I want to see. We are to meet a party from Goodnestone, Lady B. Miss Hawley & Lucy Foote - & I am to meet Mrs Harrison, & we are to talk about Ben & Anna. "My dear Mrs Harrison, I shall say, I am afraid the young Man has some of your Family Madness - & though there often appears to be something of Madness in Anna too, I think she inherits more of it from her Mother's family than from ours -" That is what I shall say - & I think she will find it difficult to answer me. - I took up your Letter again to refresh me, being somewhat tired; & was struck with the prettiness of the hand; it is really a very pretty hand now & then - so small & so neat! - I wish I could get as much into a sheet of paper. - Another time I will take two days to make a Letter in; it is fatigueing to write a whole long one at once. I hope to hear from you again on Sunday & again on friday, the day before we move. - On Monday I suppose you will be going to Streatham, to see quiet Mr Hill & eat very bad Baker's bread. - A fall in Bread by the bye. I hope my Mother's Bill next week will shew it. I have had a very comfortable Letter from her, one of her foolscap sheets quite full of little home news. - Anna was there the first of the two Days -. An Anna sent away & an Anna fetched are different things. - This will be an excellent time for Ben to pay his visit - now that we, the formidables, are absent. I did not mean to eat, but Mr Johncock has brought in the Tray, so I must. - I am all alone. Edward is gone into his Woods. - At this present time I have five Tables, Eight & twenty Chairs & two fires all to myself. - Miss Clewes is to be invited to go to the Concert with us, there will be my Brother's place & ticket for her, as he cannot go. He & the other connections of the Cages are to meet at Milgate that very day, to consult about a proposed alteration of the Maidstone road, in which the Cages are very much interested. Sir Brook comes here in the morng, & they are to be joined by Mr Deedes at Ashford. - The loss of the Concert will be no great evil to the Squire. - We shall be a party of three Ladies therefore - & to meet three Ladies. - What a convenient Carriage Henry's is, to his friends in general! - Who has it next? - I am glad William's going is voluntary, & on no worse grounds. An inclination for the Country is a venial fault. - He has more of Cowper than of Johnson in him, fonder of Tame Hares & Blank verse than of the full tide of human Existence at Charing Cross. - Oh! I have more of such sweet flattery from Miss Sharp! - She is an excellent kind friend. I am read & admired in Ireland too. - There is a Mrs Fletcher, the wife of a Judge, an old Lady & very good & very clever, who is all curiosity to know about me - what I am like & so forth -. I am not known to her by name however. This comes through Mrs Carrick, not through Mrs Gore - You are quite out there. - I do not despair of having my picture in the Exhibition at last - all white & red, with my Head on one Side; - or perhaps I may marry young Mr D'arblay. - I suppose in the meantime I shall owe dear Henry a great deal of Money for Printing &c. - I hope Mrs Fletcher will indulge herself with S & S. - If I am to stay in H.St & if you should be writing home soon I wish you wd be so good as to give a hint of it - for I am not likely to write there again these 10 days, having written yesterday.

Fanny has set her heart upon its' being a Mr Brett who is going to marry a Miss Dora Best of this Country. I dare say Henry has no objection. Pray, where did the Boys sleep? -

The Deedes' come here on Monday to stay till friday - so that we shall end with a flourish the last Canto. - They bring Isabella & one of the Grown ups - & will come in for a Canty Ball on Thursday. - I shall be glad to see them. - Mrs Deedes & I must talk rationally together I suppose.

Edward does not write to Henry, because of my writing so often. God bless you. I shall be so glad to see you again, & I wish you many happy returns of this Day. - Poor Lord Howard! How he does cry about it! - Yrs very truly,

J. A.

Miss Austen
10, Henrietta Street
Covent Garden
London

95
(mercoledì 3 novembre 1813)
Cassandra Austen, Londra


Godmersham Park mercoledì 3 nov.

Mia carissima Cassandra

Celebrerò questo famoso Compleanno (1) scrivendoti, e dato che la penna sembra propensa a scrivere largo terrò le Righe molto strette. - Ieri ho avuto giusto il tempo di gioire per la tua Lettera prima che Edward e io partissimo in Carrozza per Canterbury - e gli ho concesso di ascoltarne le parti principali durante il viaggio. Ci rallegriamo di cuore che Henry stia guadagnando terreno, e speriamo che questa settimana le condizioni del tempo gli consentano di uscire tutti i giorni, dato che è il modo migliore per metterlo in condizione di fare ciò che progetta per la prossima. - Se sta discretamente bene, andare nell'Oxfordshire lo farà star meglio, rendendolo più felice. - Può essere, che io non ti abbia fornito i minimi particolari dei progetti di Edward? - Eccoli qui - Andare a Wrotham sabato 13, passare la domenica là, ed essere a Londra lunedì per l'ora di pranzo, e se a Henry è d'accordo, passare l'intera giornata con lui - il che sarebbe martedì, così da partire per Chawton mercoledì. - Comunque, non mi sentirò del tutto tranquilla senza restare un po' con Henry, a meno che lui non desideri altrimenti; - la sua malattia e insieme il periodo morto dell'anno mi fanno pensare che sarebbe orribile da parte mia non offrirmi di rimanere con lui - e quindi, a meno che tu non sia al corrente di qualcosa in contrario, vorrei che gli dicessi con i miei saluti più affettuosi che sarò felicissima di passare 10 o 15 giorni a Henrietta Street - se sarò la benvenuta. Non più di quindici giorni perché è un po' che manco da casa, ma sarà un grandissimo piacere per me stare con lui, come lo è sempre. Verso di te provo meno rammarico e meno scrupoli, perché ti vedrò per un giorno e mezzo, e perché avrai Edward per almeno una settimana. - Il mio piano è di passare da Bookham per qualche giorno sulla via del ritorno e spero che Henry sarà così buono da accompagnarmi per una parte del viaggio. Mrs Cooke ha rinnovato molto gentilmente le due o tre dozzine di Inviti, offrendosi di venirmi a prendere ovunque in una delle sue gite all'aria aperta. - Il raffreddore di Fanny va molto meglio. Domenica, tra prendere medicine a non uscire dalla sua stanza, si è sbarazzata della parte peggiore, ma ho qualche timore per la giornata di oggi; è andata a Canterbury con Miss Clewes, Lizzy e Marianne e il tempo non è dei migliori per chiunque sia un po' debilitato. - Da quando è tornata Miss Clewes non era mai andata a Canterbury, ed era ora che lo facesse. Edward e io abbiamo avuto una mattinata deliziosa per il nostro tragitto fin lì, me lo sono proprio goduto, ma la Giornata si è imbruttita prima di ripartire, e siamo tornati a casa con un po' di pioggia e con la paura che aumentasse. Comunque non ci ha dato affatto fastidio. - È andato per un'ispezione alla Prigione, come Magistrato ospite, e mi ha portato con sé. - Mi ha fatto piacere - e ho provato tutti i sentimenti che penso debba provare chiunque visitando un Edificio del genere. - Non abbiamo fatto altre visite - solo gironzolato e fatto spese in tutta tranquillità. - Io ho preso il biglietto per un Concerto e un mazzolino di fiori adatto alla mia veneranda età. - Per passare dalle Stelle alle Stalle con inimitabile disinvoltura ora ti racconterò qualcosa del gruppo di Bath - e sono ancora un gruppo di Bath, perché la scorsa settimana è arrivato un attacco di Gotta. - Le notizie di Lady B. sono buone quanto possono esserlo in circostanze simili, il Dr P. dice che sembra Gotta benigna, e l'umore di lei è migliore del solito, ma per quanto riguarda la partenza, è naturalmente del tutto incerta. Ho davvero pochi dubbi sul fatto che Edward vada a Bath, se non l'avranno lasciata quando lui sarà nell'Hampshire; se ci andrà, partirà da Steventon, e poi tornerà direttamente a Londra, senza ripassare per Chawton. - Questa reclusione non è adatta al suo carattere. - Comunque potrebbe anche essere una buona cosa che il Dr P. abbia trovato Lady B. con la Gotta. Harriot non desiderava altro. - La giornata sembra migliorare. Vorrei che lo facesse anche la mia penna. - Caro Mr Ogle. Immagino che possa vedere tutti i Panorami per nulla, (2) ha ingresso libero dappertutto; è così simpatico! - D'ora in poi, non avrai più bisogno di vedere altro. - Sono contenta che avremo occasione di dare un'occhiata a Charles e a Fanny a Natale, ma non forzare la piccola Cass. a restare se non ne ha voglia. - Per quanto riguarda Mrs F. A. hai fatto molto bene. - Le notizie che mi hai dato di S & S. mi fanno piacere. Non l'ho mai visto pubblicizzato. - Oggi, in una lettera a Fanny, Harriot chiede se a Bedford House vendono Tessuti per Mantelli - e se è così, ti sarebbe molto obbligata se gli chiedessi di spedirle dei Campioni, con la Larghezza e il Prezzo - possono mandarli da Charing Cross quasi ogni giorno della settimana - ma se è una ditta pronta cassa non va bene, perché la nuora dell'Arcivescovo (3) dice che non può pagarli subito. - Fanny e io sospettiamo che non trattino quell'Articolo. - Credo che gli Sherer si stiano davvero preparando ad andarsene, Joseph ha avuto un Giaciglio qui le ultime due notti, e non so se sia questo o no il giorno del trasferimento. Ieri Mrs Sherer è venuta a prendere congedo. Il tempo sembra di nuovo peggiorare. Domani pranziamo a Chilham Castle, e mi aspetto un po' di svago; ma di più dal Concerto del giorno dopo, dato che sono certa di assistere a diverse cose che volevo vedere. Incontreremo un gruppo da Goodnestone, Lady B. Miss Hawley e Lucy Foote - e io incontrerò Mrs Harrison, e parleremo di Ben e Anna. "Mia cara Mrs Harrison, le dirò, temo che il Giovanotto abbia qualche ramo di Follia della vostra Famiglia - e sebbene spesso sembri che anche in Anna ci sia un qualche ramo di Follia, credo che lei ne abbia ereditata di più dalla famiglia della Madre che dalla nostra -" Ecco quello che le dirò - credo che avrà qualche difficoltà a replicare. - Ho ripreso la tua Lettera per rinfrescarmi le idee, dato che sono un po' stanca; e sono stata colpita dall'eleganza della grafia; a volte è davvero una bella calligrafia - così minuta e così netta! - Vorrei essere capace di mettere così tante cose in un foglio di carta. - La prossima volta mi prenderò due giorni di tempo per scrivere una Lettera; è faticoso scriverne una lunga tutta in una volta. Spero di avere di nuovo tue notizie domenica e ancora venerdì, il giorno prima della nostra partenza. - Lunedì presumo che andrai a Streatham, a trovare il pacato Mr Hill e a mangiare il pessimo pane del Fornaio. - Pare che il Pane sia calato. Spero che il Conto della Mamma della settimana prossima lo dimostrerà. Ho ricevuto una Lettera molto soddisfacente da lei, uno di quei suoi foglioni pieni zeppi di notiziole familiari. - Anna era stata lì per la prima di due Giornate -. Una Anna mandata via e una Anna andata a prendere sono cose diverse. - Per Ben è un'ottima occasione per fare una visita - ora che noi, le terribili, siamo assenti. Non avevo intenzione di mangiare, ma Mr Johncock ha portato il Vassoio, così sono costretta a farlo. - Sono tutta sola. Edward se n'è andato nei suoi Boschi. - In questo momento ho cinque Tavoli, Ventotto Sedie e due caminetti tutti per me. (4) Miss Clewes sarà invitata a venire con noi al Concerto, ci sarà il posto e il biglietto di nostro Fratello, dato che non può venire. Lui e gli altri conoscenti dei Cage si devono incontrare a Milgate proprio quel giorno, per consultarsi circa la proposta di una modifica della strada per Maidstone, a cui i Cage sono fortemente interessati. Sir Brook verrà qui in mattinata, e saranno raggiunti da Mr Deedes a Ashford. - La perdita del Concerto non sarà una tragedia per lo Squire. Perciò saremo un gruppo di tre Signore - e incontreremo tre Signore. - Che comodità la Carrozza di Henry, per tutti i suoi amici! - Chi sarà il prossimo? - Sono lieta che William si offra volontario, e non sui terreni peggiori. Un'inclinazione per la Campagna è un peccato veniale. - C'è più Cowper che Johnson in lui, più amante di Lepri addomesticate e Blank verse che dell'enorme folla di esseri umani a Charing Cross. (5) - Oh! ho avuto ancora un dolce elogio da Miss Sharp! - È un'amica eccellente e gentile. Sono letta e ammirata anche in Irlanda. - C'è una certa Mrs Fletcher, la moglie di un Giudice, una vecchia Signora molto buona e molto intelligente, che è curiosissima di conoscermi - come sono e così via -. Comunque non mi conosce per nome. La notizia arriva attraverso Mrs Carrick, non Mrs Gore - Tu non c'entri niente. - Non dispero di avere finalmente il mio ritratto in Mostra - tutto bianco e rosso, con la testa da un Lato; (6) - o forse potrei sposare il giovane Mr D'arblay. - Nel frattempo suppongo che dovrò al caro Henry un bel po' di Soldi per la Stampa ecc. (7) - Spero che Mrs Fletcher si conceda anche S & S. - Se starò a Henrietta Street e se tu dovessi scrivere presto a casa mi auguro che sarai così buona da accennare alla cosa - perché non è probabile che io scriva di nuovo per 10 giorni, avendo scritto ieri.

Fanny si è messa in testa che sia un certo Mr Brett quello che sta per sposare una certa Miss Dora Best di qui. Immagino che Henry non abbia obiezioni. Di grazia, dove hanno dormito i Ragazzi? -

I Deedes arrivano lunedì per restare fino a venerdì - così concluderemo con un ghirigoro l'ultimo Canto. - Portano Isabella e una delle Grandi - e vengono per un Ballo a Canterbury giovedì. - Sarò contenta di vederli. - Immagino che Mrs Deedes e io chiacchiereremo in modo razionale.

Edward non scrive a Henry, poiché io scrivo così spesso. Dio ti benedica. Sarò così contenta di rivederti, e ti auguro cento di questi Giorni. (8) - Povero Lord Howard! quanto ci piangerà su quella cosa! (9) - Sempre tua,

J. A.



(1) Janice Kirkland ritiene che si tratti del compleanno della principessa Sophia, la quinta delle figlie di Giorgio III, nata il 3 novembre 1777 ("Jane Austen and the Celebrated Birthday", in "Notes and Queries", n. 34(4), dic. 1987, pagg. 477-78).

(2) Robert Baker, insieme al figlio Henry Aston Baker, aveva ideato una sorta di museo, a Leicester Square, dove venivano esposti, in due sale circolari su due piani, panorami di città, battaglie, luoghi vari ecc.; che si estendevano a 360°. Sotto si può vedere una stampa della battaglia di Trafalgar, che ovviamente va immaginata su una tela che circondava completamente il visitatore (cliccando sull'immagine si apre una nuova finestra con la stampa ingrandita). Il biglietto d'ingresso costava uno scellino per ciascun dipinto e probabilmente Mr Ogle doveva essere un amico del proprietario, visto che entrava gratis.

(3) Il marito di Harriot Bridges, il rev. George Moore, era figlio del rev John Moore, che era stato arcivescovo di Canterbury dal 1783 al 1805, anno della sua morte.

(4) La stanza di cui parla JA era certamente la grande biblioteca di Godmersham Park, che si affacciava verso nord nell'ala est dell'edificio (ovvero, nell'immagine sotto, le finestre dell'ala sporgente in primo piano).

(5) JA si riferisce a una poesia di William Cowper: Epitaph on a Hare (Epitaffio su una Lepre) e alla Life of Johnson di James Boswell, 2 aprile 1775: "Fleet-street has a very animated appearance; but I think the full tide of human existence is at Charing-cross." ("Fleet Street ha un aspetto molto animato, ma ritengo che il maggiore affollamento di esseri umani sia a Charing Cross.")

(6) Le Faye annota: "Senza dubbio JA stava pensando ai ritratti femminili di Sir Joshua Reynolds."

(7) La seconda edizione di Sense and Sensibility era a spese dell'autrice.

(8) Non sono auguri di compleanno: Cassandra era nata il 9 gennaio 1773.

(9) Janice Kirkland (vedi nota 1) ritiene che si tratti del Lord Howard tesoriere della regina; è plausibile che le spese di un compleanno reale facessero piangere chi amministrava i conti.

96
(Saturday 6 - Sunday 7 November 1813)
Cassandra Austen, London


Saturday Novr 6. - Godmersham Park

My dearest Cassandra

Having half an hour before breakfast - (very snug, in my own room, lovely morng, excellent fire, fancy me) I will give you some account of the last two days. And yet, what is there to be told? - I shall get foolishly minute unless I cut the matter short. - We met only the Brittons at Chilham Castle, besides a Mr & Mrs Osborne & a Miss Lee staying in the House, & were only 14 altogether. My Br & Fanny thought it the pleasantest party they had ever known there & I was very well entertained by bits & scraps. - I had long wanted to see Dr Britton, & his wife amuses me very much with her affected refinement & elegance. - Miss Lee I found very conversible; she admires Crabbe as she ought. - She is at an age of reason, ten years older than myself at least. She was at the famous Ball at Chilham Castle, so of course you remember her. - By the bye, as I must leave off being young, I find many Douceurs in being a sort of Chaperon for I am put on the Sofa near the Fire & can drink as much wine as I like. We had Music in the Eveng, Fanny & Miss Wildman played, & Mr James Wildman sat close by & listened, or pretended to listen. - Yesterday was a day of dissipation all through, first came Sir Brook to dissipate us before breakfast - then there was a call from Mr Sherer, then a regular morng visit from Lady Honeywood in her way home from Eastwell - then Sir Brook & Edward set off - then we dined (5 in number) at ½ past 4 - then we had coffee, & at 6 Miss Clewes, Fanny & I draved away. We had a beautiful night for our frisks. - We were earlier than we need have been, but after a time Lady B. & her two companions appeared, we had kept places for them & there we sat, all six in a row, under a side wall, I between Lucy Foote & Miss Clewes. - Lady B. was much what I expected, I could not determine whether she was rather handsome or very plain. - I liked her, for being in a hurry to have the Concert over & get away, & for getting away at last with a great deal of decision & promtness, not waiting to compliment & dawdle & fuss about seeing dear Fanny, who was half the eveng in another part of the room with her friends the Plumptres. I am growing too minute, so I will go to Breakfast. When the Concert was over, Mrs Harrison & I found each other out & had a very comfortable little complimentary friendly Chat. She is a sweet Woman, still quite a sweet Woman in herself, & so like her Sister! - I could almost have thought I was speaking to Mrs Lefroy. - She introduced me to her Daughter, whom I think pretty, but most dutifully inferior to la Mere Beauté. The Faggs & the Hammonds were there, Wm Hammond the only young Man of renown. Miss looked very handsome, but I prefer her little, smiling, flirting Sister Julia. - I was just introduced at last to Mary Plumptre, but should hardly know her again. She was delighted with me however, good Enthusiastic Soul! - And Lady B. found me handsomer than she expected, so you see I am not so very bad as you might think for. - It was 12 before we reached home. We were all dog-tired, but pretty well today, Miss Clewes says she has not caught cold, & Fanny's does not seem worse. I was so tired that I began to wonder how I should get through the Ball next Thursday, but there will be so much more variety then in walking about, & probably so much less heat that perhaps I may not feel it more. My China Crape is still kept for the Ball. Enough of the Concert. - I had a Letter from Mary Yesterday. They travelled down to Cheltenham last Monday very safely & are certainly to be there a month. - Bath is still Bath. The H. Bridges' must quit them early next week, & Louisa seems not quite to despair of their all moving together, but to those who see at a distance there appears no chance of it. - Dr Parry does not want to keep Lady B. at Bath when she can once move. That is lucky. - You will see poor Mr Evelyn's death. Since I wrote last, my 2d Edit. has stared me in the face. - Mary tells me that Eliza means to buy it. I wish she may. It can hardly depend upon any more Fyfield Estates. - I cannot help hoping that many will feel themselves obliged to buy it. I shall not mind imagining it a disagreable Duty to them, so as they do it. Mary heard before she left home, that it was very much admired at Cheltenham, & that it was given to Miss Hamilton. It is pleasant to have such a respectable Writer named. I cannot tire you I am sure on this subject, or I would apologise. - What weather! & what news! - We have enough to do to admire them both. - I hope You derive your full share of enjoyment from each.

I have extended my Lights and increased my acquaintance a good deal within these two days. Lady Honeywood, you know; - I did not sit near enough to be a perfect Judge, but I thought her extremely pretty & her manners have all the recommendations of Ease & goodhumour & unaffectedness; - & going about with 4 Horses, & nicely dressed herself - she is altogether a perfect sort of Woman. - Oh! & I saw Mr Gipps last night - the useful Mr Gipps, whose attentions came in as acceptably to us in handing us to the Carriage, for want of a better Man, as they did to Emma Plumptre. - I thought him rather a good looking little Man. - I long for your Letter tomorrow, particularly that I may know my fate as to London. My first wish is that Henry shd really chuse what he likes best; I shall certainly not be sorry if he does not want me. - Morning church tomorrow. - I shall come back with impatient feelings. The Sherers are gone, but the Pagets are not come, we shall therefore have Mr S. again. Mr Paget acts like an unsteady Man. Dr Mant however gives him a very good Character; what is wrong is to be imputed to the Lady. - I dare say the House likes Female Government. - I have a nice long Black & red letter from Charles, but not communicating much that I did not know. There is some chance of a good Ball next week, as far as Females go. Lady Bridges may perhaps be there with some Knatchbulls. - Mrs Harrison perhaps with Miss Oxenden & the Miss Papillons - & if Mrs Harrison, then Lady Fagg will come. The shades of Evening are descending & I resume my interesting Narrative. Sir Brook & my Brother came back about 4, & Sir Brook almost immediately set forward again for Goodnestone. - We are to have Edwd B. tomorrow, to pay us another Sunday's visit - the last, for more reasons than one; they all come home on the same day that we go. - The Deedes' do not come till Tuesday. Sophia is to be the Comer. She is a disputable Beauty that I want much to see. Lady Eliz. Hatton & Annamaria called here this morng; - Yes, they called, - but I do not think I can say anything more about them. They came & they sat & they went. Sunday. - Dearest Henry! What a turn he has for being ill! & what a thing Bile is! - This attack has probably been brought on in part by his previous confinement & anxiety; - but however it came, I hope it is going fast, & that you will be able to send a very good account of him on Tuesday. - As I hear on Wednesday, of course I shall not expect to hear again on friday. Perhaps a Letter to Wrotham would not have an ill effect. We are to be off on Saturday before the Post comes in, as Edward takes his own Horses all the way. He talks of 9 o'clock. We shall bait at Lenham. Excellent sweetness of you to send me such a nice long Letter; - it made its appearance, with one from my Mother, soon after I & my impatient feelings walked in. - How glad I am that I did what I did! - I was only afraid that you might think the offer superfluous, but you have set my heart at ease. - Tell Henry that I will stay with him, let it be ever so disagreable to him. Oh! dear me! - I have not time or paper for half that I want to say. - There have been two Letters from Oxford, one from George yesterday. They got there very safely, Edwd two hours behind the Coach, having lost his way in leaving London. George writes cheerfully & quietly - hopes to have Utterson's rooms soon, went to Lecture on wednesday, states some of his expences, and concludes with saying, "I am afraid I shall be poor." - I am glad he thinks about it so soon. - I beleive there is no private Tutor yet chosen, but my Brother is to hear from Edwd on the subject shortly. - You, & Mrs H. & Catherine & Alethea going about together in Henry's carriage, seeing sights! - I am not used to the idea of it yet. All that you are to see of Streatham, seen already! - Your Streatham & my Bookham may go hang. - The prospect of being taken down to Chawton by Henry, perfects the plan to me. - I was in hopes of your seeing some illuminations, & you have seen them. "I thought you would came, and you did came." I am sorry he is not to came from the Baltic sooner. - Poor Mary! - My Brother has a Letter from Louisa today, of an unwelcome nature; - they are to spend the winter at Bath. - It was just decided on. - Dr Parry wished it, - not from thinking the Water necessary to Lady B. - but that he might be better able to judge how far his Treatment of her, which is totally different from anything she had been used to - is right; & I suppose he will not mind having a few more of her Ladyship's guineas. - His system is a Lowering one. He took twelve ounces of Blood from her when the Gout appeared, & forbids Wine &c. - Hitherto, the plan agrees with her. - She is very well satisfied to stay, but it is a sore disappointment to Louisa & Fanny. -

The H. Bridges leave them on Tuesday, & they mean to move into a smaller House. You may guess how Edward feels. - There can be no doubt of his going to Bath now; - I should not wonder if he brought Fanny Cage back with him. - You shall hear from me once more, some day or other.

Yours very affec:ly
J. A.

We do not like Mr Hampson's scheme.

Miss Austen
10, Henrietta Street
Covent Garden
London

96
(sabato 6 - domenica 7 novembre 1813)
Cassandra Austen, Londra


Sabato 6 nov. - Godmersham Park

Mia carissima Cassandra

Avendo una mezzora prima della colazione - (al calduccio, nella mia stanza, mattinata incantevole, fuoco eccellente, immaginami) ti darò qualche notizia dei due ultimi giorni. Eppure, che si può dire? - dovrei dedicarmi a stupide minuzie a meno che non la faccia breve. - A Chilham Castle abbiamo incontrato solo i Britton, oltre a Mr e Mrs Osborne e una certa Miss Lee che è ospite della Famiglia, e in tutto erano solo 14. Nostro Fratello e Fanny l'hanno ritenuta la compagnia più simpatica mai conosciuta e io mi sono intrattenuta ottimamente con le inezie. - Da tempo desideravo conoscere il Dr Britton, e sua moglie mi diverte moltissimo con la sua esibita raffinatezza ed eleganza. Miss Lee l'ho trovata molto socievole; ammira Crabbe quanto deve. - È nell'età della ragione, almeno dieci anni più vecchia di me. Era al famoso Ballo a Chilham Castle, (1) perciò naturalmente ti ricorderai di lei. A proposito, dato che ho smesso di sentirmi giovane, trovo molte Dolcezze nell'essere una specie di Accompagnatrice perché mi metto sul Sofà vicino al fuoco e posso bere quanto vino voglio. In Serata c'è stata Musica, hanno suonato Fanny e Miss Wildman, con Mr James Wildman seduto lì vicino ad ascoltare, o a fingere di ascoltare. - Ieri è stata una giornata di completa dissipazione, prima è venuto Sir Brook a dissiparci prima di colazione - poi c'è stata una visita di Mr Sherer, poi l'abituale visita mattutina di Lady Honeywood tornando a casa da Eastwell - poi Sir Brook e Edward se ne sono andati - poi abbiamo pranzato (in 5) alle 4 e ½ - poi abbiamo preso il caffè, e alle 6 Miss Clewes, Fanny e io siamo partite. È stata una bella serata per i nostri svaghi. - Siamo arrivate prima del dovuto, ma dopo un po' sono comparse Lady B. e le sue due compagne, avevamo lasciato i posti per loro e ci siamo sedute, tutte e sei in fila, su un lato della parete, io tra Lucy Foote e Miss Clewes. Lady B. era come mi aspettavo, non sono riuscita a decidere se sia piuttosto bella o molto ordinaria. - Mi è piaciuta, perché non vedeva l'ora che finisse il Concerto per filarsela, e perché se l'è filata con molta decisione e prontezza, senza aspettare di fare i complimenti o attardarsi in smancerie per aver visto la cara Fanny, che per metà della serata era stata in un'altra parte della sala con le sue amiche Plumptre. Sto diventando troppo minuziosa, così andrò a fare Colazione. Una volta finito il Concerto, Mrs Harrison e io ci siamo ritrovate fuori e abbiamo fatto una piacevolissima e amichevole piccola Chiacchierata di cortesia. È una Donna deliziosa, una Donna deliziosa in tutto e per tutto, e così simile alla Sorella! - Potevo quasi pensare di stare parlando con Mrs Lefroy. - Mi ha presentato la Figlia, che mi è sembrata graziosa, ma molto rispettosamente inferiore a la Mere Beauté. (2) C'erano anche i Fagg e gli Hammond, W. Hammond il solo Giovanotto conosciuto. La Miss (3) faceva la figura di una gran bellezza, ma io preferisco la Sorella, la piccola Julia, sorridente e civetta. - Proprio alla fine sono stata presentata a Mary Plumptre, ma la riconoscerei a stento. Comunque con me è stata deliziosa, che Anima Entusiasta! - E Lady B. mi ha trovata più bella di quanto si aspettasse, così puoi renderti conto di come io non sia così male come puoi pensare. - Era mezzanotte quando siamo tornate a casa. Eravamo tutte stanche morte, ma oggi stiamo abbastanza bene, Miss Clewes dice di non aver preso freddo, e Fanny non sembra stare peggio. Ero così stanca che ho cominciato a chiedermi come avrei fatto per il Ballo di giovedì prossimo, ma in quel caso ci sarà talmente più possibilità di gironzolare, e probabilmente talmente meno caldo che forse non sentirò la stanchezza. Il mio Crespo Cinese è ancora buono per il Ballo. Ne ha avuto abbastanza del Concerto. - Ieri ho ricevuto una Lettera di Mary. Lunedì scorso sono arrivati sani e salvi a Cheltenham e sono decisi a restarci un mese. - Bath è sempre Bath. H. Bridges e la moglie devono andarsene all'inizio della settimana prossima, e Louisa non dispera di poter partire tutti insieme, ma per quelli che vedono la cosa a distanza non sembra che ce ne sia la possibilità. - Il Dr Parry non vuole trattenere Lady B. a Bath ove abbia la possibilità di partire. E questa è una fortuna. - Avrai saputo della morte del povero Mr Evelyn. Da quando ti ho scritto l'ultima volta, ho sempre avuto davanti agli occhi la mia 2ª Ediz. Mary mi dice che Eliza ha intenzione di comprarlo. Mi piacerebbe che lo facesse. Non può certo dipendere dalle Tenute di Fyfield. (4) - Non posso fare a meno di sperare che molti si sentano obbligati a comprarlo. Non posso immaginare che per loro sia un dovere sgradito, perciò lo compreranno. Prima di partire, Mary aveva sentito dire che era molto ammirato a Cheltenham, e che ciò era dovuto a Miss Hamilton. Fa piacere essere nominati da una Scrittrice così rispettabile. (5) Sono certa di non annoiarti con questo argomento, altrimenti me ne scuso. - Che tempo! e che notizia! (6) - Abbiamo abbastanza da fare per ammirare entrambi. - Spero che trarrai la tua parte di piacere da tutti e due.

Ho ampliato le mie Vedute e accresciuto le mie conoscenze un bel po' in questi due giorni. Lady Honeywood, lo sai; - non ero seduta abbastanza vicino per essere un Giudice perfetto, ma mi è sembrata estremamente graziosa e i suoi modi hanno tutte le qualità della Disinvoltura, del buonumore e della naturalezza; - e visto che va in giro con 4 Cavalli, e si veste in modo elegante - è nel complesso un genere perfetto di Donna. - Oh! e ieri sera ho visto Mr Gipps - L'utile Mr Gipps, le cui attenzioni si sono esplicate in modo accettabile verso di noi portandoci alla Carrozza, in mancanza di meglio, così come lo erano state per Emma Plumptre. - Mi è sembrato un Ometto che si presenta bene. - Desidero tanto una tua Lettera domani, in particolare per sapere il mio destino londinese. Il mio primo desiderio è che Henry scelga liberamente ciò che più gli aggrada; di certo non me la prenderò se non mi vuole. - Domani mattinata in chiesa. - Tornerò a casa con uno stato d'animo impaziente. Gli Sherer se ne sono andati, ma i Paget non sono arrivati, perciò avremo ancora Mr S. Mr Paget agisce come una Persona indecisa. Tuttavia il Dr Mant lo ritiene di ottimo Carattere; il lato sbagliato è da imputare alla sua Signora. Immagino che in Casa piaccia una Conduzione Femminile. - Ho ricevuto una lunga Lettera Nera e rossa (7) da Charles, ma non c'era molto che non sapessi. C'è qualche possibilità di un buon Ballo la settimana prossima, quanto a Donne partecipanti. Forse ci sarà Lady Bridges con qualcuno dei Knatchbull. - Forse Mrs Harrison con Miss Oxenden e le signorine Papillon - e se ci sarà Mrs Harrison, allora verrà Lady Fagg. Stanno scendendo le ombre della Sera e io riprendo la mia interessante Narrazione. Sir Brook e nostro Fratello sono tornati intorno alle 4, e Sir Brook si è diretto quasi immediatamente a Goodnestone. - Domani avremo Edward B., per un'altra visita domenicale - l'ultima, per più di un motivo; tornano tutti a casa lo stesso giorno della nostra partenza. - I Deedes non verranno fino a martedì. Ci sarà Sophia. È una Bellezza controversa che voglio tanto vedere. Stamattina sono venute Lady Eliz. Hatton e Annamaria; - Sì, sono venute - ma credo di non poter dire nulla di più di loro. Sono arrivate, si sono sedute e se ne sono andate. Domenica. - Carissimo Henry! Che talento ha per sentirsi male! e che razza di Bile è! - Probabilmente questo attacco è stato provocato in parte dalla reclusione e dallo stato d'ansia precedenti; - ma comunque sia venuto, spero che passi presto, e che martedì sarai in grado di mandare buone nuove di lui. - Dato che ho avuto notizie mercoledì, naturalmente non mi aspetto di averne ancora venerdì. Forse una Lettera a Wrotham non avrebbe un effetto negativo. Sabato partiremo prima dell'arrivo della Posta, dato che Edward userà i suoi Cavalli per tutto il tragitto. Parla delle 9. Ci rifocilleremo a Lenham. Sei stata estremamente gentile a mandarmi una Lettera così bella e così lunga; - è apparsa, insieme a una della Mamma, subito dopo che io e la mia impazienza eravamo rientrate. - Come sono contenta di aver fatto ciò che ho fatto! - Temevo solo che tu potessi ritenere superflua l'offerta, ma mi hai tranquillizzata. - Di' a Henry che voglio stare con lui, per quanto possa risultargli sgradevole. Oh! povera me! - Non ho né tempo né carta per la metà di quello che vorrei dire. - Sono arrivate due lettere da Oxford, una di George ieri. Sono arrivati sani e salvi, Edward due ore dopo la Carrozza, avendo smarrito la strada partendo da Londra. George scrive con allegria e tranquillità - spera di avere presto la stanza di Utterson, mercoledì è andato a Lezione, specifica qualcuna delle sue spese, e conclude dicendo, "Temo che sarò povero." - Sono contenta che ci pensi così presto. - Credo che ancora non sia stato scelto un Tutor privato, ma nostro Fratello sentirà Edward a breve sull'argomento. - Tu, Mrs H., Catherine e Alethea che ve ne andate in giro insieme nella carrozza di Henry, mirabile visione! - Non mi sono ancora abituata all'idea. Tutto ciò che dovevate vedere a Streatham, già visto! - La tua Streatham e la mia Bookham possono andare al diavolo. - La prospettiva di essere portata a Chawton da Henry, per quanto mi riguarda perfeziona il piano. - Speravo in qualche vostra illuminazione, e l'avete avuta. "Pensavo che sareste arrivati, e siete arrivati." Mi dispiace che lui non arrivi più presto dal Baltico. (8) - Povera Mary! - Oggi nostro Fratello ha ricevuto una Lettera di Louisa, di un genere sgradito; - passeranno l'inverno a Bath. - Era stato appena stabilito. - Il Dr Parry aveva voluto così, - non perché ritenesse necessarie le Acque per Lady B. - ma perché avrebbe potuto giudicare meglio fin dove arrivasse il Trattamento che le aveva prescritto, che è totalmente diverso da qualsiasi altro a cui era stata abituata - è giusto, e suppongo che lui non faccia caso al sovrappiù di ghinee che avrà da sua Signoria. - Il suo è un sistema a Eliminazione. Le cava dodici once di Sangue non appena si manifesta la Gotta, e proibisce Vino ecc. - Finora, il piano incontra l'approvazione della paziente. - Lei è molto soddisfatta di restare, ma è una cocente delusione per Louisa e per Fanny. -

H. Bridges e la moglie le lasceranno martedì, e hanno intenzione di trasferirsi in una Casa più piccola. Puoi immaginare la reazione di Edward. - Ora non ci sono più dubbi sul fatto che vada a Bath; - non mi meraviglierei se riportasse Fanny Cage con sé. - Avrai ancora mie notizie, un giorno o l'altro.

Con tanto affetto, tua
J. A.

Il progetto di Mr Hampson non ci piace.



(1) Probabile che JA si riferisca al ballo dato dai Wildman a Chilham Castle nel gennaio del 1801 (vedi le lettere 30 e 31).

(2) JA cita il nomignolo con il quale era conosciuta Madame de Sevigné (1626-1696), la scrittrice francese famosa per il suo epistolario.

(3) William Hammond aveva cinque figlie; Elizabeth, Mary, Charlotte, Julia e Jemima; chiamandola "Miss [Hammond]" JA intendeva la più grande, ovvero Elizabeth, sempre che questa all'epoca non fosse sposata: in questo caso "Miss Hammond" sarebbe stata la più grande non sposata, ovvero Mary o Charlotte.

(4) Alla fine del Seicento la famiglia Fowle aveva comprato una tenuta a Fyfield, nel Wiltshire; nel 1812 la tenuta era stata messa in vendita dal rev. Fulwar-Craven Fowle.

(5) Chapman annota: "Elizabeth Hamilton (1758-1816); probabilmente JA aveva letto The Cottagers of Glenburnie (1808), e il 'rispettabile' fa pensare che conoscesse Popular Essays on the Elementary Principles of the Human Mind (1812), o almeno la reputazione di questo lavoro e di altri simili."

(6) Chapman ci informa che dovrebbe trattarsi della lettura di un messaggio di Wellington riguardante le fasi successive alla battaglia di Vittoria (21 giugno 1813), durante gli scontri con i francesi in Spagna. Il messaggio fu letto in entrambe le Camere (dei Lords e dei Comuni) il 4 novembre 1813.

(7) Nella lettera di Charles c'erano probabilmente delle parti sovrapposte, come faceva spesso anche JA (vedi, p. es., la nota 8 alla lettera 39), e l'inchiostro di colori diversi era stato usato per facilitare la lettura.

(8) JA si riferisce al fratello Frank, che era al comando di una nave nel Mar Baltico: la frase precedente era evidentemente un ricordo d'infanzia del fratello.

97
(Wednesday 2 - Thursday 3 March 1814)
Cassandra Austen, Chawton


Henrietta St Wednesday March 2d

My dear Cassandra

You were wrong in thinking of us at Guildford last night, we were at Cobham. On reaching G. we found that John & the Horses were gone on. We therefore did no more there than we had done at Farnham, sit in the Carriage while fresh Horses were put in, & proceeded directly to Cobham, which we reached by 7, & about 8 were sitting down to a very nice roast fowl &c. - We had altogether a very good Journey, & everything at Cobham was comfortable. - I could not pay Mr Herington! - That was the only alas! of the Business. I shall therefore return his Bill & my Mother's £2. - that you may try your Luck. - We did not begin reading till Bentley Green. Henry's approbation hitherto is even equal to my wishes; he says it is very different from the other two, but does not appear to think it at all inferior. He has only married Mrs R. I am afraid he has gone through the most entertaining part. - He took to Lady B. & Mrs N. most kindly, & gives great praise to the drawing of the Characters. He understands them all, likes Fanny and I think foresees how it will all be. - I finished the Heroine last night & was very much amused by it. I wonder James did not like it better. It diverted me exceedingly. - We went to bed at 10. I was very tired, but slept to a miracle & am lovely today; & at present Henry seems to have no complaint. We left Cobham at ½ past 8, stopped to bait & breakfast at Kingston & were in this House considerably before 2 - quite in the style of Mr Knight. Nice smiling Mr Barlowe met us at the door, & in reply to enquiries after News, said that Peace was generally expected. - I have taken possession of my Bedroom, unpacked my Bandbox, sent Miss P.'s two Letters to the twopenny post, been visited by Mde B., - & am now writing by myself at the new Table in the front room. It is snowing. - We had some Snowstorms yesterday, & a smart frost at night, which gave us a hard road from Cobham to Kingston; but as it was then getting dirty & heavy, Henry had a pair of Leaders put on from the latter place to the bottom of Sloane St. - His own Horses therefore cannot have had hard work. - I watched for Veils as we drove through the Streets, & had the pleasure of seeing several upon vulgar heads. - And now, how do you all do? You in particular after the worry of yesterday & the day before. I hope Martha had a pleasant visit again, & that You & my Mother could eat your Beefpudding. Depend upon my thinking of the Chimney Sweeper as soon as I wake tomorrow. - Places are secured at Drury Lane for Saturday, but so great is the rage for seeing Keen that only a 3d & 4th row could be got. As it is in a front box however, I hope we shall do pretty well. - Shylock - A good play for Fanny. She cannot be much affected I think. - Mrs Perigord has just been here. I have paid her a Shilling for the Willow. She tells me that we owe her Master for the Silk-dyeing. - My poor old Muslin has never been dyed yet; it has been promised to be done several times. - What wicked People Dyers are. They begin with dipping their own Souls in scarlet sin. - Tell my Mother that my £6.15. was duly received, but placed to my account instead of hers, & I have just signed a something which makes it over to her. It is Eveng. We have drank tea & I have torn through the 3d vol. of the Heroine, & I do not think it falls off. - It is a delightful burlesque, particularly on the Radcliffe style. - Henry is going on with Mansfield Park; he admires H. Crawford - I mean properly - as a clever, pleasant Man. - I tell you all the Good I can, as I know how much you will enjoy it. -

John Warren & his wife are invited to dine here, to name their own day in the next fortnight. - I do not expect them to come. - Wyndham Knatchbull is to be asked for Sunday, & if he is cruel enough to consent, somebody must be contrived to meet him. - We hear that Mr Keen is more admired than ever. The two vacant places of our two rows, are likely to be filled by Mr Tilson & his Brother Genl Chownes. - I shall be ready to laugh at the sight of Frederick again. - It seems settled that I have the carriage on friday to pay visits, I have therefore little doubt of being able to get to Miss Hares. I am to call upon Miss Spencer: Funny me! -

There are no good Places to be got in Drury Lane for the next fortnight, but Henry means to secure some for Saturday fortnight when You are reckoned upon. -

I wonder what worse thing than Sarah Mitchell You are forced upon by this time! - Give my Love to little Cassandra, I hope she found my Bed comfortable last night & has not filled it with fleas. - I have seen nobody in London yet with such a long chin as Dr Syntax, nor Anybody quite so large as Gogmagoglicus. - Yours affecly

J. Austen

Thursday

My Trunk did not come last night, I suppose it will this morng; if not I must borrow Stockings & buy Shoes & Gloves for my visit. I was foolish not to provide better against such a Possibility. I have great hope however that writing about it in this way, will bring the Trunk presently. -

Miss Austen
Chawton
Pr favor of
E. W. Gray Esqre

97
(mercoledì 2 - giovedì 3 marzo 1814)
Cassandra Austen, Chawton


Henrietta Street mercoledì 2 marzo

Mia cara Cassandra

Sbagliavi a pensare che ieri sera fossimo a Guildford, eravamo a Cobham. Appena arrivati a G. abbiamo scoperto che John e i Cavalli avevano proseguito. Quindi non abbiamo fatto nulla di più di quanto avevamo fatto a Farnham, siamo rimasti in Carrozza mentre venivano attaccati Cavalli freschi, e abbiamo proseguito subito per Cobham, dove siamo arrivati alle 7, e all'incirca alle 8 eravamo seduti davanti a uno splendido pollo arrosto ecc. - Nel complesso è stato un Viaggio ottimo, e a Cobham era tutto comodissimo. - Non ho potuto pagare Mr Herington! - È stato l'unico ahimè! della Faccenda. - Perciò restituirò il Conto e le 2 sterline della Mamma - affinché tu possa tentare di essere più fortunata. - Non abbiamo iniziato a leggere fino a Bentley Green. (1) Finora l'approvazione di Henry è esattamente pari ai miei desideri; dice che è molto diverso dagli altri due, ma non sembra considerarlo affatto inferiore. È arrivato solo al matrimonio di Mrs R. Temo che abbia oltrepassato la parte più interessante. - Ha preso in simpatia Lady B. e Mrs N., e fa grandi elogi sulla descrizione dei Personaggi. Ha capito il carattere di tutti, gli piace Fanny e credo preveda che fine faranno tutti. (2) - Ieri sera ho finito The Heroine (3) e mi sono molto divertita. Mi meraviglio che a James non sia piaciuto di più. Io l'ho trovato estremamente spassoso. - Siamo andati a letto alle 10. Io ero molto stanca, ma ho dormito che è una meraviglia e oggi sto benissimo; e al momento sembra che Henry non abbia alcun disturbo. Abbiamo lasciato Cobham alle 8 e ½, abbiamo fatto sosta a Kingston per la colazione ed eravamo a Casa molto prima delle 2 - proprio nello stile di Mr Knight. Mr Barlowe ci ha accolti alla porta con un bel sorriso, e in risposta alle nostre domande su che Novità ci fossero, ha detto che tutti si aspettavano la Pace. (4) - Ho preso possesso della mia Camera, ho aperto la Cappelliera, spedito le due Lettere di Miss P. con la posta da due penny, (5) ricevuto la visita di Madame B., - e ora sto scrivendo da sola sul Tavolo nuovo del salotto grande. Sta nevicando. - Ieri c'era stata qualche Nevicata, e un gelo pungente di Sera, che aveva reso difficile la strada da Cobham a Kingston; ma dato che poi stava diventando fangosa e pesante, Henry ha fatto attaccare due Cavalli di testa da quest'ultima tappa fino in fondo a Sloane Street. I suoi Cavalli perciò non hanno dovuto faticare troppo. - Sono stata attenta alle Velette mentre attraversavamo la città, e ho avuto il piacere di vederne diverse su teste volgari. - E ora, come state voi tutte? Tu in particolare dopo il problema di ieri e del giorno prima. Spero che Martha abbia fatto di nuovo una visita piacevole, e che Tu e la Mamma abbiate mangiato il pasticcio di manzo. Conta sul fatto che domani appena sveglia penserò allo Spazzacamino. - Ci siamo assicurati i posti al Drury Lane per sabato, ma la smania di vedere Mr Keen (6) è così grande che abbiamo potuto prendere solo una 3ª e una 4ª fila. - Shylock (7) - Una bella commedia per Fanny. Non credo che ne sia rimasta molto colpita. - Mrs Perigord è appena stata qui. Le ho pagato uno Scellino per il Salice. (8) Mi ha detto che dobbiamo al suo Padrone la tintura della Seta. - La mia povera vecchia Mussolina non è mai stata tinta finora; le è stato promesso di farlo diverse volte. - Come sono perfidi i Tintori. Cominciano col tingersi l'Anima con lo scarlatto del peccato. - Di' alla Mamma che le mie 6 sterline e 15 scellini sono state debitamente ricevute, ma sono state messe sul mio conto invece del suo, e ho appena firmato qualcosa per girarle sul suo. È sera. Abbiamo preso il tè e io ho divorato il 3° vol. di The Heroine, (9) e non mi pare che peggiori. - È una deliziosa parodia, in particolare dello stile della Radcliffe. Henry va avanti con Mansfield Park; ammira H. Crawford (10) - nel modo giusto intendo dire - come un Uomo intelligente e piacevole. - Ti dico tutto ciò che posso di Buono, perché so che ti farà piacere. -

John Warren e sua moglie sono stati invitati a pranzo, e decideranno loro stessi il giorno nelle prossime due settimane. - Non mi aspetto che vengano. - Wyndham Knatchbull sarà invitato per domenica, se sarà tanto crudele da accettare, qualcuno dovrà trovare il modo di accoglierlo. - Abbiamo sentito dire che Mr Keen è più ammirato che mai. I due posti liberi delle nostre due file, saranno probabilmente occupati da Mr Tilson e dal Fratello, il Gen. Chownes. - Sarò pronta a farmi una risata nel rivedere Frederick. (11) - Sembra stabilito che venerdì avrò la carrozza per fare visite, ho quindi pochi dubbi sul fatto di essere in grado di andare da Miss Hares. Farò visita a Miss Spencer: che divertimento! -

Non ci sono buoni posti al Drury Lane per le prossime due settimane, ma Henry intende assicurarsene qualcuno per il sabato successivo quando ci sarai anche Tu. -

Mi domando che cosa peggio di Sarah Mitchell sarai costretta a sopportare a questo punto! - I miei saluti affettuosi alla piccola Cassandra, spero che la notte scorsa abbia trovato comodo il mio Letto e non l'abbia riempito di pulci. - Non ho ancora visto nessuno a Londra con il mento lungo come quello del Dr Syntax, (12) né Nessuno grosso come Gogmagoglicus. (13) - Con affetto, tua

J. Austen

Giovedì

Ieri sera il mio Baule non è arrivato, suppongo che arrivi stamattina; altrimenti dovrò prendere in prestito le Calze e comprare Scarpe e Guanti per la mia visita. Sono stata sciocca a non premunirmi meglio per una tale Eventualità. Comunque nutro grandi speranze che scriverne in questo modo, mi farà avere il Baule a momenti. -



(1) Si trattava delle bozze di Mansfield Park, che verrà pubblicato da Egerton il 9 maggio di quell'anno.

(2) I personaggi citati sono naturalmente quelli di Mansfield Park: Mrs Rushworth (Maria Bertram), Lady Bertram, Mrs Norris e Fanny Price.

(3) Eaton Stannard Barrett (1786-1820, The Heroine, or Adventures of a Fair Romance Reader (1813), una parodia del romanzo gotico e, in particolare, di quelli di Ann Radcliffe, come scrive JA poco dopo (vedi la nota 9). L'anno successivo fu pubblicata una seconda edizione, con alcune modifiche e con il titolo The Heroine, or Adventures of Cherubina.

(4) La parabola di Napoleone era ormai nella fase finale: il 31 marzo era caduta Parigi e qualche giorno dopo l'imperatore francese sarà esiliato all'isola d'Elba.

(5) A Chawton c'erano due possibili "Miss P." che avrebbero potuto affidare a JA lettere da recapitare a Londra: Elizabeth Papillon e Catherine-Ann Prowting. La tariffa per lettere spedite a Londra a indirizzi in città era di due penny, più economica di quella che sarebbe stata applicata per la spedizione da Chawton.

(6) Edmund Kean (1787-1833), il più famoso attore shakespeariano dell'epoca, aveva recitato per la prima volta al Drury Lane il 26 gennaio di quell'anno e aveva avuto un successo travolgente.

(7) Il protagonista di Il mercante di Venezia di Shakespeare.

(8) Con "willow sheets" (o anche "willow squares") si indicavano dei pezzi di legno di salice intrecciati, usati per fare cappelli.

(9) Vedi la nota 3.

(10) Henry Crawford, personaggio di Mansfield Park.

(11) Le Faye annota: "Il nome di battesimo del generale (Tilson) Chowne era Christopher; ma anche nelle lettere 98 e 99 è citato come 'Frederick'. Potrebbe essere che Cassandra e JA avessero tempo addietro visto una rappresentazione amatoriale di Lovers Vows, con un più giovane Mr (Tilson) Chowne nella parte di 'Frederick', che JA assegnò a Henry Crawford in Mansfield Park? La traduzione di Inchbald di Lovers Vows fu rappresentata per la prima volta a Londra, al Covent Garden, l'11 ottobre 1798, e diverse edizioni del testo furono pubblicate negli anni 1798-1800."

(12) William Combe (1741-1823), The Tour of Dr Syntax in Search of the Picturesque (1812), una serie di poemi satirici che si prendevano gioco della moda del "pittoresco". Il libro era illustrato con delle tavole di Thomas Rowlandson, che ritraevano il Dr Syntax con un mento molto pronunciato.

(13) Un gigante mitico citato in molte leggende, ma anche, a Londra, due statue a Guildhall, alte oltre quattro metri, raffiguranti i due giganti Gog e Magog (citati anche in Apocalisse 20,8 come personaggi o luoghi mitici), catturati e incatenati da Brutus, il leggendario discendente di Enea fondatore dell'Inghilterra.

 

98
(Saturday 5 - Tuesday 8 March 1814)
Cassandra Austen, Chawton


Henrietta St Saturday March 5.

My dear Cassandra

Do not be angry with me for beginning another Letter to you. I have read the Corsair, mended my petticoat, & have nothing else to do. - Getting out is impossible. It is a nasty day for everybody. Edward's spirits will be wanting Sunshine, & here is nothing but Thickness & Sleet; and tho' these two rooms are delightfully warm I fancy it is very cold abroad. - Young Wyndham accepts the Invitation. He is such a nice, gentlemanlike, unaffected sort of young Man, that I think he may do for Fanny; - has a sensible, quiet look which one likes. - Our fate with Mrs L. and Miss E. is fixed for this day senight. - A civil note is come from Miss H. Moore, to apologise for not returning my visit today & ask us to join a small party this Eveng - Thank ye, but we shall be better engaged. - I was speaking to Mde B. this morng about a boil'd Loaf, when it appeared that her Master has no raspberry Jam; She has some, which of course she is determined he shall have; but cannot you bring him a pot when you come? -

Sunday. - I find a little time before breakfast for writing. - It was considerably past 4 when they arrived yesterday; the roads were so very bad! - as it was, they had 4 Horses from Cranford Bridge. Fanny was miserably cold at first, but they both seem well. - No possibility of Edwd's writing. His opinion however inclines against a second prosecution; he thinks it wd be a vindictive measure. He might think differently perhaps on the spot. - But things must take their chance. -

We were quite satisfied with Kean. I cannot imagine better acting, but the part was too short, & excepting him and Miss Smith, & she did not quite answer my expectation, the parts were ill filled & the Play heavy. We were too much tired to stay for the whole of Illusion (Nourjahad) which has 3 acts; - there is a great deal of finery & dancing in it, but I think little merit. Elliston was Nourjahad, but it is a solemn sort of part, not at all calculated for his powers. There was nothing of the best Elliston about him. I might not have known him, but for his voice. - A grand thought has struck me as to our Gowns. This 6 weeks mourning makes so great a difference that I shall not go to Miss Hare, till you can come & help chuse yourself; unless you particularly wish the contrary. - It may be hardly worthwhile perhaps to have the Gowns so expensively made up; we may buy a cap or a veil instead; - but we can talk more of this together. - Henry is just come down, he seems well, his cold does not increase. I expected to have found Edward seated at a table writing to Louisa, but I was first. - Fanny I left fast asleep. - She was doing about last night, when I went to sleep, a little after one. - I am most happy to find there were but five shirts. - She thanks you for your note, & reproaches herself for not having written to you, but I assure her there was no occasion. - The accounts are not capital of Lady B. - upon the whole I beleive Fanny liked Bath very well. They were only out three Evengs; - to one Play & each of the Rooms; - Walked about a good deal, & saw a good deal of the Harrisons & Wildmans. - All the Bridgeses are likely to come away together, & Louisa will probably turn off at Dartford to go to Harriot. - Edward is quite [about five words cut out]. - Now we are come from Church, & all going to write. - Almost everybody was in mourning last night, but my brown gown did very well. Gen:l Chowne was introduced to me; he has not much remains of Frederick. - This young Wyndham does not come after all; a very long & very civil note of excuse is arrived. It makes one moralize upon the ups & downs of this Life. I have determined to trim my lilac sarsenet with black sattin ribbon just as my China Crape is, 6d width at the bottom, 3d or 4d at top. - Ribbon trimmings are all the fashion at Bath, & I dare say the fashions of the two places are alike enough in that point, to content me. - With this addition it will be a very useful gown, happy to go anywhere. - Henry has this moment said that he likes my M. P. better & better; - he is in the 3d vol. - I beleive now he has changed his mind as to foreseeing the end; - he said yesterday at least, that he defied anybody to say whether H. C. would be reformed, or would forget Fanny in a fortnight. - I shall like to see Kean again excessively, & to see him with You too; - it appeared to me as if there were no fault in him anywhere; & in his scene with Tubal there was exquisite acting. Edward has had a correspondence with Mr Wickham on the Baigent business, & has been shewing me some Letters enclosed by Mr W. from a friend of his, a Lawyer, whom he had consulted about it, & whose opinion is for the prosecution for assault, supposing the Boy is acquitted on the first, which he rather expects. - Excellent Letters; & I am sure he must be an excellent Man. They are such thinking, clear, considerate Letters as Frank might have written. I long to know Who he is, but the name is always torn off. He was consulted only as a friend. When Edwd gave me his opinion against the 2d prosecution, he had not read this Letter, which was waiting for him here. - Mr. W. is to be on the Grand Jury. This business must hasten an Intimacy between his family & my Brother's. - Fanny cannot answer your question about button holes till she gets home. - I have never told you, but soon after Henry & I began our Journey, he said, talking of Yours, that he shd desire you to come post at his expence, & added something of the Carriage meeting you at Kingston. He has said nothing about it since. - Now I have just read Mr Wickham's Letter, by which it appears that the Letters of his friend were sent to my Brother quite confidentially - therefore do'nt tell. By his expression, this friend must be one of the Judges. A cold day, but bright and clean. - I am afraid your planting can hardly have begun. - I am sorry to hear that there has been a rise in tea. I do not mean to pay Twining till later in the day, when we may order a fresh supply. - I long to know something of the Mead - & how you are off for a Cook. - Monday. Here's a day! - The Ground covered with snow ! What is to become of us? - We were to have walked out early to near Shops, & had the Carriage for the more distant. - Mr Richard Snow is dreadfully fond of us. I dare say he has stretched himself out at Chawton too. - Fanny & I went into the Park yesterday & drove about & were very much entertained; - and our Dinner & Eveng went off very well. - Messrs J. Plumptre and J. Wildman called while we were out; & we had a glimpse of them both & of G. Hatton too in the Park. I could not produce a single acquaintance. - By a little convenient Listening, I now know that Henry wishes to go to Gm for a few days before Easter, & has indeed promised to do it. - This being the case, there can be no time for your remaining in London after your return from Adlestrop. - You must not put off your coming therefore; - and it occurs to me that instead of my coming here again from Streatham, it will be better for you to join me there. - It is a great comfort to have got at the truth. - Henry finds he cannot set off for Oxfordshire before the Wednesy which will be ye 23d; but we shall not have too many days together here previously. - I shall write to Catherine very soon. Well, we have been out, as far as Coventry St -; Edwd escorted us there & back to Newtons, where he left us, & I brought Fanny safe home. It was snowing the whole time. We have given up all idea of the Carriage. Edward & Fanny stay another day, & both seem very well pleased to do so. - Our visit to the Spencers is of course put off. - Edwd heard from Louisa this morng. Her Mother does not get better, & Dr Parry talks of her beginning the Waters again; this will be keeping them longer in Bath, & of course is not palateable. You cannot think how much my Ermine Tippet is admired both by Father & Daughter. It was a noble Gift. - Perhaps you have not heard that Edward has a good chance of escaping his Lawsuit. His opponent "knocks under". The terms of Agreement are not quite settled. - We are to see "the Devil to pay " to night. I expect to be very much amused. - Excepting Miss Stephens, I dare say Artaxerxes will be very tiresome. - A great many pretty Caps in the Windows of Cranbourn Alley! - I hope when you come, we shall both be tempted. - I have been ruining myself in black sattin ribbon with a proper perl edge; & now I am trying to draw it up into kind of Roses, instead of putting it in plain double plaits. - Tuesday. My dearest Cassandra in ever so many hurries I acknowledge the receipt of your Letter last night, just before we set off for Covent Garden. - I have no Mourning come, but it does not signify. This very moment has Richd put it on the Table. - I have torn it open & read your note. Thank you, thank you, thank you. -

Edwd is amazed at the 64 Trees. He desires his Love & gives you notice of the arrival of a Study Table for himself. It ought to be at Chawton this week. He begs you to be so good as to have it enquired for, & fetched by the Cart ; but wishes it not to be unpacked till he is on the spot himself. It may be put in the Hall. - Well, Mr Hampson dined here & all that. I was very tired of Artaxerxes, highly amused with the Farce, & in an inferior way with the Pantomime that followed. Mr J. Plumptre joined in the latter part of the Eveng - walked home with us, ate some soup, & is very earnest for our going to Cov. Gar. again to night to see Miss Stephens in the Farmers Wife. He is to try for a Box. I do not particularly wish him to succeed. I have had enough for the present. - Henry dines to day with Mr Spencer. -

Yours very affecly
J. Austen

Miss Austen
Chawton
By favour of
Mr Gray

98
(sabato 5 - martedì 8 marzo 1814)
Cassandra Austen, Chawton


Henrietta Street sabato 5 marzo.

Mia cara Cassandra

Non essere in collera con me perché inizio a scrivere un'altra Lettera. Ho letto il Corsair, (1) rammendata la mia sottoveste, e non ho nient'altro da fare. - Uscire è impossibile. È una giornataccia per tutti. Lo stato d'animo di Edward richiederebbe un bel Sole, e qui non c'è altro che Foschia e Nevischio; e sebbene queste due stanze siano deliziosamente calde immagino che fuori faccia molto freddo. - Il giovane Wyndham accetta l'Invito. È un Giovanotto così piacevole, signorile e spontaneo, che penso possa fare al caso di Fanny; - ha un aspetto sensibile e tranquillo che piace. - Il nostro crudele destino con Mrs L. e Miss E. è fissato per sabato della settimana prossima. - È arrivato un cortese biglietto di Miss H. Moore, che si scusa per non aver ricambiato oggi la mia visita e ci chiede di unirci a un piccolo ricevimento questa Sera - Grazie, ma avremo altro da fare. - Stamattina stavo parlando con Madame Bigeon di Cavolo bollito, quando è apparso chiaro che il suo Padrone non ha la Marmellata di lamponi; lei ne ha un po', che naturalmente è decisa a fargli avere; ma tu non puoi portarne un barattolo quando vieni? -

Domenica. - Ho un po' di tempo prima di colazione per scrivere. - Ieri erano passate da un bel po' le 4 quando sono arrivati; le strade erano talmente pessime! comunque, hanno avuto 4 Cavalli da Cranford Bridge. Fanny all'inizio era molto infreddolita, ma sembrano entrambi in salute. - Non c'è possibilità che Edward scriva. Tuttavia la sua opinione tende a essere contro una seconda accusa; ritiene che sarebbe una misura punitiva. Forse sul luogo la penserebbe diversamente. - Ma le cose devono fare il loro corso. - (2)

Siamo rimasti molto soddisfatti di Kean. Non riesco a immaginare una recitazione migliore, ma la parte era troppo breve, (3) e salvo lui e Miss Smith, e lei non ha corrisposto del tutto alle mie aspettative, le parti erano mal assegnate e lo Spettacolo pesante. Eravamo troppo stanchi per restare a vedere per intero Illusione (Nourjahad) (4) che è in 3 atti; - c'era una gran quantità di sfarzo e danze, ma credo ben poco valore. Elliston era Nourjahad, ma è una parte solenne, assolutamente inadatta alle sue capacità. In lui non c'era nulla del miglior Elliston. Non l'avrei nemmeno riconosciuto, se non fosse stato per la sua voce. - Mi è venuta in mente un'idea grandiosa per i nostri Vestiti. Queste 6 settimane di lutto (5) hanno fatto una tale differenza che non andrò da Miss Hare, finché non sarai arrivata e spero mi aiuterai a scegliere; a meno che tu non abbia qualcosa in contrario. - Forse non vale la pena farsi fare Vestiti così costosi; al posto loro possiamo comprare un cappello e una veletta; - ma potremo parlarne meglio insieme. - Henry è appena sceso, sembra stia bene, il raffreddore non è peggiorato. Mi aspettavo di trovare Edward seduto al tavolo a scrivere a Louisa, ma sono stata la prima. Fanny l'ho lasciata che dormiva profondamente. - Stava ancora trafficando ieri sera, quando io sono andata a dormire, poco dopo l'una. - Sono felicissima di scoprire che c'erano solo cinque camicie. - Ti ringrazia per il biglietto, e si rimprovera per non averti scritto, ma ti assicuro che non ne ha avuto la possibilità. - Le notizie di Lady B. non sono il massimo - tutto sommato credo che a Fanny Bath sia piaciuta molto. Sono stati fuori solo tre Sere; - a uno Spettacolo e a entrambe le Sale; (6) - Sono andate un bel po' in giro, e hanno visto un bel po' di Harrison e di Wildman. - È probabile che tutti i Bridges vadano via insieme, e Louisa farà probabilmente una deviazione a Dartford per andare da Harriot. - Edward è completamente [circa cinque parole tagliate]. - Ora andremo in Chiesa, e tutti hanno intenzione di scrivere. - Ieri sera erano quasi tutti in lutto, ma il mio vestito marrone ha fatto un figurone. Mi è stato presentato il Gen. Chowne; non è restato molto di Frederick. (7) - Alla fine il giovane Wyndham non verrà; è arrivata una lunghissima e cortesissima nota. Fa un sunto moraleggiante degli alti e bassi della sua Vita. Ho deciso di ornare l'ermesino lilla con la fettuccia nera proprio come il mio Crespo Cinese, 6 di larghezza in basso, 3 o 4 in alto. - Le guarnizioni con la fettuccia a Bath sono di moda, e credo che la moda dei due posti sia abbastanza simile in questo caso, per contentarmi. - Con questa aggiunta sarà un vestito molto utile, adatto a ogni occasione. - In questo istante Henry ha detto che M. P. gli piace sempre di più; - è al 3° vol. - Credo che ormai abbia cambiato idea circa la previsione del finale; - alla fine ieri ha detto, che sfida chiunque a dire se H. C. sarà riabilitato, o si scorderà di Fanny (8) in un paio di settimane. - Mi piacerebbe moltissimo rivedere Kean, e anche vederlo con Te; - mi è sembrato come se in lui non ci fossero difetti di nessun genere; e nella scena con Tubal (9) la recitazione è stata squisita. Edward ha avuto una corrispondenza con Mr Wickam sull'affare Baigent, (10) e mi ha fatto vedere alcune Lettere di un suo amico accluse da Mr W., si tratta di un Avvocato, che aveva consultato in merito, e che è per la prosecuzione dell'accusa, nel caso il Ragazzo sia in un primo momento assolto, cosa che ritiene probabile. - Lettere eccellenti; e sono certa che dev'essere un Uomo eccellente. Sono delle Lettere così ragionevoli, chiare, attente, come le avrebbe scritte Frank. Mi piacerebbe molto sapere Chi è, ma il nome è sempre tagliato via. È stato consultato solo come amico. Quando Edward si era espresso contro una 2ª accusa, non aveva letto questa Lettera, che lo stava aspettando qui. - Mr W. sarà nella Giuria. Questa faccenda dovrebbe affrettare un'Intimità tra la sua famiglia e quella di nostro Fratello. - Fanny non può rispondere alla tua domanda circa le asole finché non torna a casa. - Non te l'ho mai raccontato, ma subito dopo aver cominciato il nostro Viaggio, Henry ha detto, parlando del Tuo, che vorrebbe che tu arrivassi alla Stazione di Posta a sue spese, e ha aggiunto qualcosa sulla Carrozza che dovrebbe prenderti a Kingston. Da allora non ne ha più parlato. - Proprio ora ho letto la Lettera di Mr Wickam, dalla quale si capisce che le Lettere del suo amico mandate a nostro Fratello sono del tutto confidenziali - perciò non ne parlare. Da ciò che dice, questo amico dovrebbe essere uno dei Giudici. Una giornata fredda, ma luminosa e tersa. - Temo sia difficile che possano essere cominciati i tuoi lavori di inscatolamento. - Mi dispiace sentire che c'è stato un aumento del tè. Non ho intenzione di andare da Twining (11) se non sul tardi in giornata, quando potremo ordinare una provvista fresca. - Vorrei molto sapere qualcosa dell'Idromele - e come sei messa per la Cuoca. - Lunedì. Il giorno è arrivato! - Il Suolo è coperto di neve! Che ne sarà di noi? - Dovevamo uscire presto per andare a piedi in alcuni Negozi vicini, e avevamo la Carrozza per i più lontani. - Mr Richard Snow (12) si è tremendamente affezionato a noi. Immagino che si sia allungato anche verso Chawton. - Ieri Fanny e io abbiamo fatto un giro in carrozza nel Parco e ci siamo molto divertite; - e il Pranzo e la Serata sono andati molto bene. - I signori J. Plumptre e J. Wildman sono venuti mentre eravamo fuori; e abbiamo intravisto entrambi e G. Hatton nel Parco. Io non riesco a esibire nemmeno una conoscenza. - A seguito del breve e utile ascolto di una conversazione, ora so che Henry vuole andare per qualche giorno a Godmersham prima di Pasqua, ed è deciso a farlo. - Se questo è il caso, non c'è il tempo per te di stare a Londra dopo il tuo ritorno da Adlestrop. - Quindi non devi rimandare il tuo arrivo; - e mi viene in mente che invece di tornare qui da Streatham per conto mio, per te sarebbe meglio raggiungermi là. - È una grande consolazione essere giunti alla verità. - Henry pensa di non poter partire per l'Oxfordshire prima di mercoledì 23; ma prima non avremo troppi giorni insieme qui. - Scriverò molto presto a Catherine. Allora, siamo state fuori, fino a Coventry Street -; Edward ci ha scortate fin là e poi da Newton, dove ci ha lasciate, e io ho portato a casa Fanny sana e salva. Ha nevicato per tutto il tempo. Abbiamo rinunciato del tutto all'idea della Carrozza. Edward e Fanny si fermano un altro giorno, e sembrano entrambi molto contenti di farlo. - Naturalmente la nostra visita agli Spencer è rimandata. - Stamattina Edward ha ricevuto notizie da Louisa. La Madre non migliora, e il Dr Parry parla di farle ricominciare la cura delle Acque; questo li terrà più a lungo a Bath, e naturalmente la cosa non è ben accetta. Non immagini quanto sia stata ammirata la mia Cappa di Ermellino da Padre e Figlia. È stato un Regalo sontuoso. - Forse non hai saputo che Edward ha buone possibilità di evitare la Causa. Il suo avversario "batte cassa". I termini dell'Accordo non sono completamente fissati. (13) - Stasera andremo a vedere "the Devil to pay". (14) Mi aspetto di divertirmi moltissimo. - Salvo Miss Stephens, immagino che Artaxerxes (15) sarà molto noioso. - Un gran numero di graziosi Cappellini nelle Vetrine di Cranbourn Alley! - Spero che quando verrai, ne saremo entrambe tentate. - Mi sono rovinata per un nastro di raso nero con un bel bordo di perline; e ora sto cercando di farlo diventare come una specie di Roselline, invece di farne una doppia treccia. - Martedì. Mia carissima Cassandra sempre così indaffarata confermo che la tua Lettera è arrivata ieri sera, giusto prima di uscire per il Covent Garden. - Non ho vestiti da Lutto, ma non fa nulla. In questo preciso istante Richard l'ha messa sul tavolo. - L'ho aperta e ho letto la tua nota. Grazie, grazie, grazie. -

Edward è rimasto sbalordito dai 64 Alberi. Ti manda i suoi saluti affettuosi e ti informa dell'arrivo di una Scrivania per lui. Dovrebbe essere a Chawton in settimana. Ti prega di essere così cortese di informarti, e di mandarla a prendere con il Carro; ma vuole che non sia sballata finché lui non sarà sul posto. Puoi farla mettere nell'Atrio. - Allora, Mr Hampson ha pranzato qui e tutto il resto. Mi sono molto stancata all'Artaxerxes, estremamente divertita con la Farsa, e un po' meno con la Pantomima che è seguita. Mr. J. Plumptre ci ha raggiunti nell'ultima parte della Serata - è venuto a casa con noi, ha mangiato un po' di zuppa, ed è molto impaziente di tornare stasera al Covent Garden per vedere Miss Stephens in Farmers Wife. (16). Sta cercando di avere un Palco. Non ho chissà quale desiderio che ci riesca. Per il momento ne ho avuto abbastanza. - Oggi Henry pranza con Mr Spencer. -

Con tanto affetto, tua
J. Austen



(1) Lord Byron, The Corsair (1814), l'opera che ispirò Il corsaro (1848), opera giovanile di Giuseppe Verdi su libretto di Francesco Maria Piave.

(2) JA si riferisce al processo contro James Baigent, un ragazzino di dieci anni di Chawton, che fu processato per l'accoltellamento di un altro ragazzo, sempre di Chawton. Il processo si concluse con un'assoluzione, e non sembra che ci sia stato un seguito.

(3) Kean aveva recitato nella parte di Shylock, nel Mercante di Venezia di Shakespeare (vedi la lettera precedente).

(4) Illusion, or the Trances of Nourjahad, definito "a melodramatic spectacle", testo (pubblicato postumo) di Frances Chamberlaine Sheridan (1724-1766), da un racconto persiano, e musica di Michael Kelly.

(5) Il fratello della regina, Duca Ernst Gottlob Albert of Mecklenburg, era morto il 27 gennaio 1814.

(6) JA scrive "each Rooms", ovvero l'Assembly Rooms e la Pump Room, i due ritrovi più frequentati di Bath; il primo per il tè e il ballo, il secondo per la cura delle acque.

(7) Vedi la nota 11 alla lettera precedente.

(8) Henry Crawford e Fanny Price, due personaggi di Mansfield Park.

(9) L'ebreo amico di Shylock nel Mercante di Venezia di Shakespeare. Probabilmente JA si riferisce anche alla famosa invettiva di Shylock che precede l'arrivo di Tubal (Atto III, scena I, 50-69).

(10) Vedi la nota 2.

(11) Thomas Twining aveva aperto nel 1706 a Londra il primo negozio di tè, nello Strand.

(12) Jack Frost e Dick (Richard) Snow erano nomignoli comunemente usati per personificare il gelo e la neve.

(13) Nell'ottobre del 1814 la famiglia Hinton/Baverstock iniziò una causa contro Edward Austen per l'eredità della tenuta di Chawton; probabilmente JA si riferisce ai primi abboccamenti, che però non ebbero successo.

(14) Charles Coffey (?-1745), The Devil to Pay, or, The Wives Metamorphos'd (1731), una "ballad opera" (molto simile all'operetta e di argomento quasi sempre satirico).

(15) Opera lirica su libretto di Metastasio, probabilmente adattato in inglese dallo stesso compositore, Thomas Arne (1710-1778); rappresentata per la prima volta al Covent Garden il 2 febbraio 1762. Thomas Arne è famoso soprattutto per aver composto la musica dell'inno patriottico "Rule, Britannia!". Catherine Stephens, che aveva debuttato al Covent Garden l'anno precedente proprio con l'Artaxerxes, cantava nella parte di Mandane.

(16) Charles Dibdin (1745-1814), The Farmer's Wife (1814), opera comica in tre atti.

99
(Wednesday 9 March 1814)
Cassandra Austen, Chawton


Henrietta St Wednesday March 9.

Well, we went to the Play again last night, & as we were out great part of the morning too, shopping & seeing the Indian Jugglers, I am very glad to be quiet now till dressing time. We are to dine at the Tilsons & tomorrow at Mr. Spencers. - We had not done breakfast yesterday when Mr J. Plumptre appeared to say that he had secured a Box. Henry asked him to dine here, which I fancy he was very happy to do; & so, at 5 o'clock we four sat down to table together, while the Master of the House was preparing for going out himself. - The Farmer's Wife is a Musical thing in 3 Acts, & as Edward was steady in not staying for anything more, we were at home before 10 - Fanny and Mr J. P. are delighted with Miss S, & her merit in singing is I dare say very great; that she gave me no pleasure is no reflection upon her, nor I hope upon myself, being what Nature made me on that article. All that I am sensible of in Miss S. is, a pleasing person & no skill in acting. - We had Mathews, Liston & Emery; of course some amusement. - Our friends were off before ½ past 8 this morng, & had the prospect of a heavy cold Journey before them. - I think they both liked their visit very much, I am sure Fanny did. - Henry sees decided attachment between her & his new acquaintance. - I have a cold too as well as my Mother & Martha. Let it be a generous emulation between us which can get rid of it first. - I wear my gauze gown today, long sleeves & all; I shall see how they succeed, but as yet I have no reason to suppose long sleeves are allowable. - I have lowered the bosom especially at the corners, & plaited black sattin ribbon round the top. Such will be my Costume of Vine leaves & paste. Prepare for a Play the very first evening, I rather think Covent Garden, to see Young in Richard. - I have answered for your little companion's being conveyed to Keppel St immediately. - I have never yet been able to get there myself, but hope I shall soon. What cruel weather this is! And here is Lord Portsmouth married too to Miss Hanson. - Henry has finished Mansfield Park, & his approbation has not lessened. He found the last half of the last volume extremely interesting. I suppose my Mother recollects that she gave me no Money for paying Brecknell & Twining; and my funds will not supply enough. -

We are home in such good time that I can finish my Letter to night, which will be better than getting up to do it tomorrow, especially as on account of my Cold, which has been very heavy in my head this Eveng - I rather think of lying in bed later than usual. I would not but be well enough to go to Hertford St on any account. - We met only Genl Chowne today, who has not much to say for himself. - I was ready to laugh at the remembrance of Frederick, & such a different Frederick as we chose to fancy him to the real Christopher! - Mrs Tilson had long sleeves too, & she assured me that they are worn in the evening by many. I was glad to hear this. - She dines here I beleive next tuesday. -

On friday we are to be snug, with only Mr Barlowe & an evening of Business. - I am so pleased that the Mead is brewed! - Love to all. If Cassandra has filled my Bed with fleas, I am sure they must bite herself. -

I have written to Mrs Hill & care for nobody.

Yours affecly J. Austen

Miss Austen
Chawton
By favor of
Mr Gray. -

99
(mercoledì 9 marzo 1814)
Cassandra Austen, Chawton


Henrietta Street mercoledì 9 marzo.

Allora, ieri sera siamo riandati a Teatro, e dato che eravamo stati fuori per gran parte della mattinata, a fare spese e a vedere i Giocolieri Indiani, (1) ora sono molto contenta di poter stare tranquilla fino all'ora di vestirsi. Saremo a pranzo dai Tilson e domani da Mr Spencer. - Ieri non avevamo ancora fatto colazione quando è apparso Mr J. Plumptre per dirci che si era procurato un Palco. Henry lo ha invitato a pranzo, invito che immagino sia stato felice di accettare; e così, alle 5 noi quattro eravamo a tavola insieme, mentre il Padrone di Casa si stava preparando a uscire. - The Farmer's Wife (2) è un'opera Musicale in 3 Atti, e dato che Edward era fermamente deciso a non restare per nulla d'altro, (3) eravamo a casa prima della 10 - Fanny e Mr J. P. sono deliziati da Miss S, e posso dire che i suoi meriti di cantante sono molto ampi; il fatto che a me non abbia trasmesso alcun piacere non è una critica a lei, né spero a me stessa, dato che la Natura mi ha fatta così. Tutto ciò che mi colpisce in Miss S. è una figura piacevole e nessuna capacità di recitare. - C'erano Mathews, Liston e Emery; (4) naturalmente un po' di divertimento. - I nostri amici sono partiti stamattina prima delle 8 e ½, e avevano di fronte a loro la prospettiva di un Viaggio molto freddo. - Credo che entrambi abbiano gradito moltissimo la visita, Fanny di certo l'ha gradita. - Henry vede un innegabile attaccamento tra la sua nuova conoscenza e lei (5) - Anch'io ho il raffreddore come la Mamma e Martha. Facciamo sì che ci sia una generosa emulazione tra di noi su chi riesce a liberarsene per prima. - Oggi mi metto il vestito di mussolina, maniche lunghe e tutto il resto; vedrò come mi stanno, ma finora non ho motivo di supporre che le maniche lunghe siano lecite. - Ho abbassato la scollatura specialmente ai lati, e intrecciato un nastro di seta nera intorno alla parte alta. Così sarà il mio Costume di foglie di vite e perline. (6) Preparati per uno Spettacolo la prima sera, probabilmente al Covent Garden, a vedere Young in Riccardo. (7) - Ho disposto affinché la tua piccola compagna sia portata immediatamente a Keppel Street. - Non sono ancora stata in grado di andarci, ma spero di farlo presto. Che tempo gelido! E qui c'è anche Lord Portsmouth che si è sposato con Miss Hanson. - Henry ha finito Mansfield Park, e la sua approvazione non è diminuita. Ha trovato l'ultima metà dell'ultimo volume estremamente interessante. Immagino che la Mamma si ricordi di non avermi dato i Soldi per pagare Brecknell e Twining e i miei fondi non saranno sufficienti. -

Siamo tornati a casa così di buonora che posso finire la Lettera stasera, il che sarà meglio che farlo domani, specialmente considerando il mio Raffreddore, che Stasera ho sentito molto in testa - Credo che me ne starò a letto più del solito. In ogni caso non vorrei altro che star bene abbastanza per andare a Hertford Street. - Oggi abbiamo visto solo il Gen. Chowne, che non ha molto da dire. - Ero pronta a farmi una risata al ricordo di Frederick, e di un Frederick così diverso da quello che preferiamo immaginare rispetto al vero Christopher! (8) - Anche Mrs Tilson ha le maniche lunghe, e mi ha assicurato che di sera le portano in molte. Sono contenta di sentirlo. - Credo che martedì prossimo pranzerà qui. -

Venerdì ce ne staremo tranquilli, con solo Mr Barlowe e una serata di Affari. - Sono così contenta che l'Idromele sia in infusione! - Saluti affettuosi a tutti. Se Cassandra mi ha riempito il Letto di pulci, sono sicura che devono averla morsa. -

Ho scritto a Mrs Hill e non mi preoccupo di nessun altro.

Con affetto, tua J. Austen



(1) Gli "Indian Jugglers" era una compagnia di giocolieri indiani che in quel periodo si esibiva giornalmente al n. 87 di Pall Mall.

(2) Vedi la nota 16 alla lettera precedente.

(3) Lo spettacolo principale era seguito da All the World's a Stage, una farsa in due atti di Isaac Jackman, probabilmente ispirata a Come vi piace di Shakespeare, da cui è preso il verso del titolo.

(4) Tre popolari attori di quei tempi: Charles Mathews (1776-1835), John Liston (1776?-1846) e John Emery (1777-1822).

(5) In effetti Fanny, che aveva conosciuto John-Pemberton Plumptre nel 1811 (la "nuova conoscenza" è riferita a Henry) fu sul punto di fidanzarsi con lui (vedi le lettere 109 e 114). In quel periodo sicuramente ne era innamorata, visto che nel suo diario, all'8 marzo 1814, scrisse: "Lui è venuto stamattina presto per dirci che aveva preso un Palco per noi al Covent Garden... La serata è stata divertente, come al solito, ma l'ora di separarsi ahimè! si avvicina. Ah Lui!"

(6) Citazione da un verso di The Peacock "At Home" (Il pavone "in casa") una poesia per bambini di Catherine Ann Dorset (1750?-1817?): "But, alas! they return'd not; and she had no taste / To appear in a costume of vine-leaves or paste." ("Ma, ahimè! essi non tornarono; e lei non fu incline / Ad apparire in un costume di foglie di vite o perline").

(7) Charles Mayne Young (1777-1856), che recitava nel Riccardo III di Shakespeare.

(8) Vedi la nota 11 alla lettera 97.

100
(Monday 21 March 1814)
Francis Austen?, Spithead?


Henrietta St Monday March 21.

[Main text of p. 1 missing]

. . . and only just time enough for what is to be done. And all this, with very few acquaintance in Town & going to no Parties & living very quietly! - What do People do that . . .

[Remainder of letter missing; postscript upside down at top of p. 1]

Perhaps before the end of April, Mansfield Park by the author of S & S. - P. & P. may be in the World. - Keep tha name to yourself. I shd not like to have it known beforehand. God bless you. - Cassandra's best Love. Yours affec:ly

J. Austen

100
(lunedì 21 marzo 1814)
Francis Austen?, Spithead? (1)


Henrietta St lunedì 21 marzo.

[Manca la parte principale di pag. 1]

[...] e solo il tempo che basta per ciò che dev'essere fatto. E tutto questo, con molto poche conoscenze in Città e senza andare a Ricevimenti e facendo una vita molto tranquilla! - Chi lo fa [...]

[Manca il resto della lettera; poscritto al contrario in cima a pag. 1]

Forse prima della fine di aprile, Mansfield Park dell'autore di S & S. - P. & P. potrebbe venire al Mondo. (2) - Tieni per te il titolo. Non vorrei che si sapesse in anticipo. Dio ti benedica. - Saluti affettuosi da Cassandra. Con affetto, tua

J. Austen



(1) In merito al destinatario di questo frammento di lettera, Le Faye annota: "Di questa lettera resta troppo poco per poter identificare con certezza il destinatario. Per eliminazione, tuttavia, i più probabili sono Frank e Charles Austen; Frank era a quel tempo a bordo dell'Elephant a Spithead, e Charles si spostava tra la Namur a Sheerness e la casa dei suoceri, i Palmer, a Londra. Entrambi avrebbero apprezzato le notizie sui romanzi di JA e su ciò che lei e Cassandra facevano a Londra mentre stavano a casa di Henry. Dato che JA aveva già discusso con Frank l'opportunità di usare i nomi delle sue navi in Mansfield Park, [vedi la fine della lettera 86] sembra più probabile che avesse continuato a tener informato lui sugli sviluppi della pubblicazione."

(2) Mansfield Park fu pubblicato il 9 maggio 1814.

  81-90      |     indice lettere     |     home page     |      101-110