Jane Austen

Lettere 31-40
traduzione di Giuseppe Ierolli

  21-30      |     indice lettere     |     home page     |      41-50 

31
(Wednesday 14 - Friday 16 January 1801)
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Steventon Wednesday Janry - 14th.

Poor Miss Austen! - It appears to me that I have rather oppressed you of late by the frequency of my letters. You had hoped not to hear from me again before tuesday, but Sunday shewed you with what a merciless Sister you had to deal. - I cannot recall the past, but you shall not hear from me quite so often in future. - Your letter to Mary was duly received before she left Dean with Martha yesterday morning, & it gives us great pleasure to know that the Chilham Ball was so agreable & that you danced four dances with Mr Kemble. - Desirable however as the latter circumstance was I cannot help wondering at it's taking place; - Why did you dance four dances with so stupid a Man? - why not rather dance two of them with some elegant brother-officer who was struck with your appearance as soon as you entered the room? - Martha left you her best Love; she will write to you herself in a short time; but trusting to my memory rather than her own, she has nevertheless desired me to ask you to purchase for her two bottles of Steele's Lavender Water when you are in Town, provided you should go to the Shop on your own account; - otherwise you may be sure that she would not have you recollect the request. - James dined with us yesterday, wrote to Edward in the Evening, filled three sides of paper, every line inclining too much towards the North-East, & the very first line of all scratched out, and this morning he joins his Lady in the fields of Elysium & Ibthrop. - Last friday was a very busy day with us. We were visited by Miss Lyford and Mr Bayle. - The latter began his operations in the house, but had only time to finish the four sitting-rooms; the rest is deferred till the spring is more advanced & the days longer. - He took his paper of appraisement away with him, & therefore we only know the Estimate he has made of one or two articles of furniture, which my father particularly enquired into. I understand however that he was of opinion that the whole would amount to more than two hundred pounds, & it is not imagined that this will comprehend the Brewhouse, & many other &c. &c. - Miss Lyford was very pleasant, & gave my mother such an account of the houses in Westgate Buildings, where Mrs Lyford lodged four years ago, as made her think of a situation there with great pleasure; but your opposition will be without difficulty, decisive, & my father in particular who was very well inclined towards the Row before, has now ceased to think of it entirely. - At present the Environs of Laura-place seem to be his choice. His veiws on the subject are much advanced since I came home; he grows quite ambitious, & actually requires now a comfortable & a creditable looking house. - On Saturday Miss Lyford went to her long home - that is to say, it was a long way off; & soon afterwards a party of fine Ladies issuing from a well-known, commodious green Vehicle, their heads full of Bantam-Cocks & Galinies, entered the house. - Mrs Heathcote, Mrs Harwood, Mrs James Austen, Miss Bigg, Miss Jane Blachford. Hardly a day passes in which we do not have some visitor or other; yesterday came Mrs Bramstone, who is very sorry that she is to lose us, & afterwards Mr Holder, who was shut up for an hour with my father & James in a most aweful manner. - John Bond est a lui. - Mr Holder was perfectly willing to take him on exactly the same terms with my father, & John seems exceedingly well satisfied. - The comfort of not changing his home is a very material one to him. And since such are his unnatural feelings his belonging to Mr Holder is the every thing needful; but otherwise there would have been a situation offering to him which I had thought of with particular satisfaction, viz = under Harry Digweed, who if John had quitted Cheesedown would have been eager to engage him as superintendant at Steventon, would have kept an horse for him to ride about on, would probably have supplied him with a more permanent home, & I think would certainly have been a more desirable Master altogether. - John & Corbett are not to have any concern with each other; - there are to be two Farms and two Bailiffs. - We are of opinion that it would be better in only one. - This morning brought my Aunt's reply, & most thoroughly affectionate is it's tenor. She thinks with the greatest pleasure of our being settled in Bath; it is an event which will attach her to the place more than anything else could do, &c., &c. - She is moreover very urgent with my mother not to delay her visit in Paragon if she should continue unwell, & even recommends her spending the whole winter with them. - At present, & for many days past my mother has been quite stout, & she wishes not to be obliged by any relapse to alter her arrangements. - Mr and Mrs Chamberlayne are in Bath, lodging at the Charitable Repository; - I wish the scene may suggest to Mrs C. the notion of selling her black beaver bonnet for the releif of the poor. - Mrs Welby has been singing Duetts with the Prince of Wales. - My father has got above 500 Volumes to dispose of; - I want James to take them at a venture at half a guinea a volume. - The whole repairs of the parsonage at Deane, Inside & out, Coachbox, Basket & Dickey will not much exceed 100£. - Have you seen that Major Byng, a nephew of Lord Torrington is dead? - That must be Edmund. -

Friday. I thank you for yours, tho' I should have been more grateful for it, if it had not been charged 8d. instead of 6d., which has given me the torment of writing to Mr Lambould on the occasion. - I am rather surprised at the Revival of the London visit - but Mr Doricourt has travelled; he knows best. That James Digweed has refused Dean Curacy I suppose he has told you himself - tho' probably the subject has never been mentioned between you. - Mrs Milles flatters herself falsely; it has never been Mrs Rice's wish to have her son settled near herself - & there is now a hope entertained of her relenting in favour of Deane. - Mrs Lefroy & her son in law were here yesterday; she tries not to be sanguine, but he was in excellent Spirits. - I rather wish they may have the Curacy. It will be an amusement to Mary to superintend their Household management, & abuse them for expense, especially as Mrs L. means to advise them to put their washing out. -

Yours affec:ly JA. -

Miss Austen
Godmersham Park
Faversham
Kent.

31
(mercoledì 14 - venerdì 16 gennaio 1801)
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Steventon mercoledì 14 gennaio.

Povera Miss Austen! - Ho la sensazione di averti alquanto oppressa ultimamente con la frequenza delle mie lettere. Avevi sperato di non riavere mie nuove prima di martedì, ma la domenica ti ha mostrato con che Sorella spietata hai a che fare. - Non posso far tornare il passato, ma in futuro non avrai sicuramente mie nuove così di frequente. - La tua lettera a Mary è stata debitamente ricevuta prima che lasciasse Deane con Martha ieri mattina, e ci ha concesso la grande soddisfazione di sapere che il Ballo a Chilham è stato così piacevole e che tu hai ballato quattro volte con Mr Kemble. - Tuttavia desiderabile com'era quest'ultimo fatto non ho potuto fare a meno di meravigliarmi che abbia avuto luogo; - Perché mai hai ballato quattro volte con un Individuo così stupido? - Perché non hai piuttosto concesso due di quei balli a un certo elegante impiegato di tuo fratello che era rimasto colpito dalla tua comparsa non appena sei entrata in sala? - Martha ti ha lasciato i suoi saluti più affettuosi; ti scriverà a breve lei stessa; ma fidandosi della mia memoria più che della sua, mi ha comunque incaricata di chiederti di comprarle due flaconi di Acqua di Lavanda da Steele quando capiterai in Città, a condizione che tu vada nel Negozio a nome suo; - altrimenti puoi star certa che non se ne sarebbe ricordata. - Ieri James ha pranzato con noi, ha scritto a Edward in Serata, ha riempito tre pagine, ogni riga tendente decisamente verso Nord-Est, e la primissima cancellata, e stamattina ha raggiunto la sua Signora nei campi Elisi di Ibthrop. - Venerdì scorso abbiamo avuto una giornata molto indaffarata. Abbiamo avuto visite da Miss Lyford e Mr Bayle. - Quest'ultimo ha cominciato i lavori in casa, ma ha avuto il tempo di finire solo i quattro salotti, il resto è rimandato a quando sarà primavera avanzata e le giornate saranno più lunghe. - Non aveva con sé i preventivi, e perciò conosciamo solo la Stima che ha fatto riguardo a uno o due pezzi del mobilio, a seguito di una richiesta specifica del babbo. Tuttavia mi sembra di aver capito che fosse dell'opinione che la spesa totale dovrebbe essere superiore alle duecento sterline, e si presume che tale spesa non comprenda la Birreria, e molti altri ecc. ecc. - Miss Lyford è stata molto cordiale, e ha fornito alla mamma una tale descrizione delle case a Westgate Buildings, dove Mrs Lyford ha soggiornato quattro anni fa, da farle pensare a quel posto con grande piacere; ma la tua opposizione sarà senza dubbio, decisiva, e il babbo in particolare che prima era molto ben disposto verso quelle Case, ora non ci pensa affatto. - Al momento la sua scelta sembra orientata ai Dintorni di Laura-place. I suoi punti di vista sull'argomento sono andati molto avanti da quando sono tornata a casa; diventa sempre più ambizioso, e di fatto ora esige una casa confortevole e che appaia rispettabile. - Sabato Miss Lyford è andata nella sua lunga casa - intendevo dire, che è stata lunga la strada per arrivarci; (1) e subito dopo un gruppo di raffinate Signore scese da un ben noto Veicolo verde, con le teste piene di Galletti e Galline, vi sono entrate. - Mrs Heathcote, Mrs Harwood, Mrs James Austen, Miss Bigg, Miss Jane Blachford. Difficilmente c'è stato un giorno in cui non abbiamo avuto visite dall'una o dall'altra; ieri è venuta Mrs Bramstone, che è molto spiacente di perderci, e dopo Mr Holder, che è stato chiuso per un'ora con il Babbo e James, cosa che ha provocato molto sgomento. - John Bond est a lui. - Mr Holder è stato dispostissimo a concedergli esattamente le stesse condizioni del babbo, e John sembra assolutamente soddisfatto. - Per lui la comodità di non dover cambiare casa è molto rilevante. E dato che questi sono i suoi innaturali sentimenti il prendere servizio da Mr Holder è tutto ciò che necessita; d'altronde ci sarebbe stata una soluzione alla quale se gli fosse stata offerta avrei guardato con particolare soddisfazione, ovvero = con Harry Digweed, che se John avesse lasciato Cheesedown sarebbe stato felice di assumerlo come soprintendente a Steventon, gli avrebbe concesso un cavallo per spostarsi, lo avrebbe probabilmente fornito di una casa più duratura, e penso sarebbe stato nel complesso un Padrone più desiderabile. - John e Corbett non hanno nessun riguardo l'uno per l'altro; - così ci sono due Fattori e due Balivi. - Noi siamo dell'opinione che sarebbe stato meglio averne soltanto uno. - Stamattina abbiamo ricevuto la risposta della Zia, di un tenore colmo di affetto. Pensa con grande piacere al fatto che ci stabiliremo a Bath; è un evento che rinsalderà il suo legame con questo luogo più di quanto potesse farlo qualsiasi altro, ecc., ecc. - Inoltre insiste molto con la mamma affinché non ritardi la sua visita a Paragon se continuerà a non star bene, e le raccomanda anche di passare tutto l'inverno con loro. - Al momento, e da molti giorni la mamma si sente del tutto in forze, e non intende essere obbligata a modificare i suoi preparativi per una qualche ricaduta. - Mr e Mrs Chamberlayne sono a Bath, alloggiati vicino al Deposito di Carità; - mi auguro che la cosa possa suggerire a Mrs C. l'idea di vendere il suo berretto di castoro nero a beneficio dei poveri. - Mrs Welby ha cantato un Duetto con il Principe di Galles - Il babbo ha più di 500 volumi di cui sbarazzarsi; - vorrei che li prendesse James uno per l'altro a mezza ghinea a volume. - In totale le riparazioni della canonica di Deane, Interno ed esterno, Annessi e Connessi non supereranno di molto le 100 sterline. - Hai saputo che il Magg. Byng, un nipote di Lord Torrington è morto? - Dev'essere Edmund. - (2)

Venerdì - Ti ringrazio per la tua, benché sarei stata più grata, se non fosse costata 8 pence invece di 6, cosa che mi ha costretta al fastidio di scrivere a Mr Lambould per conoscerne il motivo. - Sono piuttosto sorpresa del ritorno d'interesse per la visita a Londra - Ma Mr Doricourt (3) ha viaggiato; ne sa più di noi. Che James Digweed abbia rifiutato la Curazia di Dean presumo te l'abbia detto lui stesso - anche se magari l'argomento non è mai stato menzionato tra di voi. - Le fantasie di Mrs Milles sono false; non è mai stato desiderio di Mrs Rice avere il figlio sistemato vicino a lei - e ora si nutre la speranza di un suo ripensamento in favore di Deane. - Ieri sono venuti Mrs Lefroy e il genero, lei non ci prova nemmeno a essere ottimista, ma lui era di ottimo Umore. (4) - Mi andrebbe abbastanza se potessero avere la Curazia. Per Mary sarebbe un passatempo soprintendere alla loro organizzazione Familiare, e insultarli per le troppe spese, specialmente perché Mrs L. ha intenzione di consigliarli di dar fuori il bucato. -

Con affetto, tua JA. -



(1) Ho tradotto letteralmente "long home" che in realtà significa "tomba"; nella frase successiva JA gioca con la parola "long", inserita in una frase che significa "molto lontana". La criptica descrizione successiva delle signore scese da un veicolo verde era sicuramente chiara per Cassandra.

(2) Chapman riporta la notizia della morte di Mr Byng, ucciso in battaglia vicino a Salisburgo, apparsa nel "Times" del 13 gennaio 1801, precisando però che la notizia parla di un cugino di Mr Wickham e non fa cenno a parentele con Lord Torrington (George Byng, 4° visconte Torrington), e che, inoltre, l'unico Edmund della famiglia Torrington morì nel 1845. Le Faye aggiunge: "L'interesse di JA per questa notizia, tuttavia, fa pensare che gli Austen conoscessero John Byng (1743-1813), scrittore di diari di viaggio [e fratello minore di George Byng], che per breve tempo fu 5° visconte Torrington. Dato che Mr Byng era parente dei Bramston di Oakley Hall, potrebbero averlo conosciuto alcuni anni prima."

(3) Personaggio di una commedia di Hannah Cowley (1743-1809), Belle's Stratagem (1780), che all'inizio dell'azione è appena tornato da un viaggio in Europa.

(4) Il genero di Mrs Lefroy ("Madame Lefroy") dovrebbe essere il rev. Henry Rice, la madre del quale è citata poco prima. Il matrimonio di Rice con Jemima-Lucy Lefroy avvenne però il 20 luglio 1801 e presumo perciò che JA scriva "son in law" riferendosi a quello che in quel momento era un genero futuro, anche perché Madame Lefroy ebbe solo due figlie femmine, una delle quali, Julia-Elizabeth, era morta nel settembre 1783 a un mese dalla nascita.

32
(Wednesday 21 - Thursday 22 January 1801)
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Steventon Wednesday Janry 21st.

Expect a most agreable Letter; for not being overburdened with subject - (having nothing at all to say) - I shall have no check to my Genius from beginning to end. - Well - & so, Frank's letter has made you very happy, but you are afraid he would not have patience to stay for the Haarlem, which you wish him to have done as being safer than the Merchantman. - Poor fellow! to wait from the middle of November to the end of December, & perhaps even longer! it must be sad work! - especially in a place where the ink is so abominably pale. - What a surprise to him it must have been on the 20th of Oct:r to be visited, collar'd & thrust out of the Petterell by Capt:n Inglis! - He kindly passes over the poignancy of his feelings in quitting his Ship, his Officers & his Men. - What a pity it is that he should not be in England at the time of this promotion, because he certainly would have had an appointment! - so everybody says, & therefore it must be right for me to say it too. - Had he been really here, the certainty of the appointment I dare say would not have been half so great - but as it could not be brought to the proof, his absence will be always a lucky source of regret. - Eliza talks of having read in a Newspaper that all the 1st Lieut:s of the Frigates whose Captains were to be sent into Line-of-Battle ships, were to be promoted to the rank of Commander -. If it be true, Mr Valentine may afford himself a fine Valentine's knot, & Charles may perhaps become 1st of the Endymion - tho' I suppose Capt: Durham is too likely to bring a villain with him under that denomination. I dined at Deane yesterday, as I told you I should; - & met the two Mr Holders. - We played at Vingt-un, which as Fulwar was unsuccessful, gave him an opportunity of exposing himself as usual. - Eliza says she is quite well, but she is thinner than when we saw her last, & not in very good looks. I suppose she has not recovered from the effects of her illness in December. - She cuts her hair too short over her forehead, & does not wear her cap far enough upon her head - in spite of these many disadvantages however, I can still admire her beauty. - They all dine here today. Much good may it do us all. William & Tom are much as usual; Caroline is improved in her person; I think her now really a pretty Child. She is still very shy, & does not talk much. Fulwar goes next month into Gloucestershire, Leicestershire & Warwickshire, & Eliza spends the time of his absence at Ibthrop & Deane; she hopes therefore to see you before it is long. Lord Craven was prevented by Company at home, from paying his visit at Kintbury, but as I told you before, Eliza is greatly pleased with him, & they seem likely to be on the most friendly terms. - Martha returns into this country next tuesday, & then begins her two visits at Deane. - I expect to see Miss Bigg every day, to fix the time for my going to Manydown; I think it will be next week, & I shall give you notice of it if I can, that you may direct to me there. - The Neighbourhood have quite recovered the death of Mrs Rider - so much so, that I think they are rather rejoiced at it now; her Things were so very dear! - & Mrs Rogers is to be all that is desirable. Not even Death itself can fix the friendship of the World. -

You are not to give yourself the trouble of going to Penlingtons when you are in Town; my father is to settle the matter when he goes there himself; You are only to take special care of the Bills of his in your hands, & I dare say will not be sorry to be excused the rest of the business. - Thursday. Our party yesterday was very quietly pleasant. To day we all attack Ash Park, & tomorrow I dine again at Deane. What an eventful Week! - Eliza left me a message for you which I have great pleasure in delivering; She will write to you & send you your Money next Sunday. - Mary has likewise a message -. She will be much obliged to you if you can bring her the pattern of the Jacket & Trowsers, or whatever it is, that Elizth:'s boys wear when they are first put into breeches -; or if you could bring her an old suit itself she would be very glad, but that I suppose is hardly do-able. I am happy to hear of Mrs Knight's amendment, whatever might be her complaint. I cannot think so ill of her however inspite of your insinuations as to suspect her of having lain-in. - I do not think she would be betrayed beyond an Accident at the utmost. - The Wylmots being robbed must be an amusing thing to their acquaintance, & I hope it is as much their pleasure as it seems their avocation to be subjects of general Entertainment. - I have a great mind not to acknowledge the receipt of your letter, which I have just had the pleasure of reading, because I am so ashamed to compare the sprawling lines of this with it! - But if I say all that I have to say, I hope I have no reason to hang myself. - Caroline was only brought to bed on the 7th of this month, so that her recovery does seem pretty rapid. - I have heard twice from Edward on the occasion, & his letters have each been exactly what they ought to be - chearful & amusing. - He dares not write otherwise to me - but perhaps he might be obliged to purge himself from the guilt of writing Nonsense by filling his shoes with whole pease for a week afterwards. - Mrs G. has left him 100£. - his Wife & son 500£ each. I join with you in wishing for the Environs of Laura place, but do not venture to expect it. - My Mother hankers after the Square dreadfully, & it is but natural to suppose that my Uncle will take her part. - It would be very pleasant to be near Sidney Gardens! - we might go into the Labyrinth every day. - You need not endeavour to match my mother's mourning Calico -, she does not mean to make it up any more. - Why did not J. D. make his proposals to you? I suppose he went to see the Cathedral, that he might know how he should like to be married in it. - Fanny shall have the Boarding-school as soon as her Papa gives me an opportunity of sending it - & I do not know whether I may not by that time have worked myself up into so generous a fit as to give it to her for ever. -

We have a Ball on Thursday too -. I expect to go to it from Manydown. - Do not be surprised, or imagine that Frank is come if I write again soon. It will only be to say that I am going to M- & to answer your [ques]tion about my Gown.

Miss Austen
Godmersham Park
Faversham
Kent

32
(mercoledì 21 - giovedì 22 gennaio 1801)
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Steventon mercoledì 21 gennaio.

Aspettati una Lettera molto piacevole; perché non essendo sovraccarica di argomenti - (non ho assolutamente nulla da dire) - potrò dare libero sfogo al mio Genio dall'inizio alla fine. - Allora - e così, la lettera di Frank ti ha fatta felice, ma hai paura che non abbia la pazienza di aspettare la Harleem, cosa che tu vorresti facesse perché la consideri più sicura della nave mercantile. - Povero ragazzo! aspettare dalla metà di novembre alla fine di dicembre, e forse ancora più a lungo! dev'essere un'impresa ben triste! - specialmente in un luogo dove l'inchiostro è così tremendamente pallido. - Che sorpresa dev'essere stata per lui il 20 ottobre essere ispezionato, messo al guinzaglio ed esonerato dalla Petterell dal Capitano Inglis! - Lui gentilmente sorvola sull'intensità delle sue sensazioni nel lasciare la sua Nave, i suoi Ufficiali i suoi Uomini. - Che peccato che non fosse in Inghilterra quando è stato promosso, perché avrebbe avuto sicuramente un incarico! - così dicono tutti, e quindi è giusto che lo dica anch'io. - Se davvero fosse stato qui, immagino che la certezza di un incarico non sarebbe stata alta quanto si dice - ma visto che non ne esiste la prova, la sua assenza sarà sempre una vantaggiosa fonte di rimpianto. - Eliza dice di aver letto in un Giornale che tutti i primi sottotenenti di Fregata il cui Capitano fosse stato assegnato alle navi in prima linea, sarebbero stati promossi al grado di Comandante -. Se fosse vero, Mr Valentine potrà permettersi un bel giorno di san Valentino, e Charles potrebbe forse diventare primo Sottotenente della Endymion - anche se suppongo che il Cap. Durham sia più propenso a portare con sé un furfante per quell'incarico. Ieri, come ti avevo detto, ho pranzato a Deane; - e ho incontrato i due signori Holder. - Abbiamo giocato a Ventuno, il che dato che Fulwar ha perso, gli ha dato modo di mettersi in mostra come al solito. - Eliza dice di stare ottimamente, ma è più magra di quando l'abbiamo vista l'ultima volta, e non ha un bell'aspetto. Credo che non si sia ancora ripresa dagli effetti della malattia che ha avuto a dicembre. - Si è tagliata i capelli troppo corti sulla fronte, e non porta il cappello abbastanza calato sulla testa - tuttavia, nonostante questi numerosi svantaggi, sono ancora in grado di ammirarne la bellezza. - Oggi saranno tutti a pranzo qui. Un grande piacere per tutti noi. William e Tom stanno come al solito; Caroline è migliorata nel fisico; ora credo proprio che sia una bella Bambina. È ancora molto timida, e non parla molto. Il mese prossimo Fulwar va nel Gloucestershire, nel Leicestershire e nel Warwickshire, e durante la sua assenza Eliza starà a Ibthrop e a Deane; spera perciò di vederti tra non molto. Lord Craven non è potuto venire perché aveva Ospiti a casa, a seguito della sua visita a Kintbury, ma come ti avevo detto in precedenza, Eliza lo trova molto piacevole, (1) e sembrano essere in rapporti molto amichevoli. - Martha tornerà nei paraggi martedì prossimo, e poi comincerà con le sue due visite a Deane. - Ogni giorno mi aspetto di vedere Miss Bigg, per fissare il giorno in cui andare a Manydown; credo che sarà per la settimana prossima, e non appena potrò te lo farò sapere, affinché tu possa indirizzarmi la posta là. - Il Vicinato ha completamente superato la morte di Mrs Rider - a un punto tale, che penso che ora ne siano piuttosto compiaciuti; i suoi Articoli erano molto cari! - e Mrs Rogers avrà tutto ciò che si può desiderare. Nemmeno la Morte riesce a mantenere l'amicizia del Mondo. -

Non devi prenderti il disturbo di andare da Penlington quando sarai a Londra; il babbo sistemerà la faccenda lui stesso quando ci andrà; devi solo prenderti cura in modo particolare dei Conti che hai in mano, e presumo che non sarà spiacevole essere esonerata dal resto. - Giovedì. Il ricevimento di ieri è stato piacevolmente tranquillo. Oggi saremo tutti all'attacco di Ash Park, e domani pranzerò di nuovo a Deane. Che Settimana movimentata! - Eliza mi ha lasciato un messaggio per te che ti trasmetto con molto piacere; ti scriverà e ti manderà il Denaro domenica prossima. - Anche Mary ha un messaggio -. Ti sarà molto obbligata se potrai portarle il modello della Giacca e Pantaloni, o qualunque cosa sia, che i ragazzi di Elizabeth portavano quando hanno messo per la prima volta le brache -; oppure se potessi portarle un vestito vecchio ne sarebbe molto lieta, ma suppongo che questo sia difficilmente fattibile. Sono contenta di sentire del miglioramento di Mrs Knight, qualunque possa essere il suo disturbo. Comunque non posso pensare così male di lei nonostante le tue insinuazioni facciano nascere sospetti sul fatto che resti confinata a letto. - Non penso che volesse farlo passare per qualcosa di più di un Incidente. - Il furto subito dai Wylmot dev'essere una faccenda spassosa per il vicinato, e spero che sia un piacere anche per loro visto che sembra ci tengano a essere protagonisti del Divertimento generale. - Ho la forte tentazione di far finta di non aver ricevuto la tua lettera, che ho appena avuto il piacere di leggere, perché mi vergogno così tanto a confrontarla con le righe disordinate di questa! - Ma se dico tutto quello che ho da dire, spero che non ci sarà motivo di impiccarmi. - Caroline ha partorito solo il 7 di questo mese, perciò pare che si stia ristabilendo abbastanza in fretta. - Ho avuto due volte notizie in merito da parte di Edward, e le sue lettere erano esattamente come dovevano essere - allegre e divertenti. - Non osa scrivere a me in modo diverso - ma forse potrebbe sentirsi obbligato a purificarsi dalla colpa di scrivere Sciocchezze riempiendosi le scarpe di sassolini per una settimana di seguito. Mrs G. gli ha lasciato 100 sterline - alla Moglie e al figlio 500 sterline ciascuno. Concordo con te nell'augurarmi i dintorni di Laura place, ma non mi azzardo a sperarlo. La Mamma vuole a tutti i costi Queen's Square, ed è naturale supporre che lo Zio prenderà le sue parti. - Sarebbe molto piacevole essere vicino ai Sidney Gardens! - potremmo andare tutti i giorni nel Labirinto. (2) - Non c'è bisogno che ti affanni con il Calicò da lutto della mamma -, non ha più intenzione di lavorarci. - Perché J. D. non ti ha chiesto di sposarlo? Immagino che sia andato a vedere la Cattedrale, per rendersi conto se gli sarebbe piaciuto sposarsi là. - Fanny avrà il libro sul Collegio (3) non appena il suo Papà mi darà modo di spedirglielo - e non so se in quel momento potrei essere diventata talmente generosa da darglielo per sempre. -

Da noi giovedì ci sarà anche un Ballo -. Credo che ci andrò da Manydown. - Non ti devi sorprendere, o immaginare che scriva ancora perché è arrivato Frank. È solo per dirti che andrò a M- e risponderò alla tua domanda circa il mio Vestito. (4)



(1) Vedi la lettera n. 30.

(2) I desideri di JA furono ampiamente soddisfatti, visto che gli Austen, subito dopo il trasferimento a Bath, presero una casa in affitto al n. 4 di Sydney Place, proprio davanti ai Sydney Gardens.

(3) Le Faye fa alcune ipotesi sul titolo del libro: The Governess, or, Little Female Academy (L'istitutrice, ovvero. la piccola scuola femminile) di Sarah Fielding (1741, ristampato nel 1768); Anecdotes of a Boarding School (Aneddoti di un collegio) di Dorothy Kilner (c.1782); The Governess; or Evening Amusements at a Boarding-School (L'istitutrice; ovvero I divertimenti serali in un collegio) di anonimo (1800).

(4) Il manoscritto è integro, ma non ci sono né i convenevoli di chiusura né la firma.

33
(Sunday 25 January 1801) - no ms.
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Steventon Sunday January 25

I have nothing to say about Manydown, but I write because you will expect to hear from me, and because if I waited another day or two, I hope your visit to Goodnestone would make my letter too late in its arrival. I dare say I shall be at M. in the course of this week, but as it is not certain you will direct to me at home. I shall want two new coloured gowns for the summer, for my pink one will not do more than clear me from Steventon. I shall not trouble you, however, to get more than one of them, and that is to be a plain brown cambric muslin, for morning wear; the other, which is to be a very pretty yellow and white cloud, I mean to buy in Bath. Buy two brown ones, if you please, and both of a length, but one longer than the other - it is for a tall woman. Seven yards for my mother, seven yards and a half for me; a dark brown, but the kind of brown is left to your own choice, and I had rather they were different, as it will be always something to say, to dispute about which is the prettiest. They must be cambric muslin. How do you like this cold weather? I hope you have all been earnestly praying for it as a salutary relief from the dreadfully mild and unhealthy season preceding it, fancying yourself half putrified from the want of it, and that now you all draw into the fire, complain that you never felt such bitterness of cold before, that you are half starved, quite frozen, and wish the mild weather back again with all your hearts. Your unfortunate sister was betrayed last Thursday into a situation of the utmost cruelty. I arrived at Ashe Park before the Party from Deane, and was shut up in the drawing-room with Mr Holder alone for ten minutes. I had some thoughts of insisting on the housekeeper or Mary Corbett being sent for, and nothing could prevail on me to move two steps from the door, on the lock of which I kept one hand constantly fixed. We met nobody but ourselves, played at vingt-un again, and were very cross. On Friday I wound up my four days of dissipation by meeting William Digweed at Deane, and am pretty well, I thank you, after it. While I was there a sudden fall of snow rendered the roads impassable, and made my journey home in the little carriage much more easy and agreeable than my journey down. Fulwar and Eliza left Deane yesterday. You will be glad to hear that Mary is going to keep another maid. I fancy Sally is too much of a servant to find time for everything, and Mary thinks Edward is not so much out of doors as he ought to be; there is therefore to be a girl in the nursery. I would not give much for Mr Rice's chance of living at Deane; he builds his hope, I find, not upon anything that his mother has written, but upon the effect of what he has written himself. He must write a great deal better than those eyes indicate if he can persuade a perverse and narrow-minded woman to oblige those whom she does not love. Your brother Edward makes very honourable mention of you, I assure you, in his letter to James, and seems quite sorry to part with you. It is a great comfort to me to think that my cares have not been thrown away, and that you are respected in the world. Perhaps you may be prevailed on to return with him and Elizabeth into Kent, when they leave us in April, and I rather suspect that your great wish of keeping yourself disengaged has been with that view. Do as you like; I have overcome my desire of your going to Bath with my mother and me. There is nothing which energy will not bring one to. Edward Cooper is so kind as to want us all to come to Hamstall this summer, instead of going to the sea, but we are not so kind as to mean to do it. The summer after, if you please, Mr Cooper, but for the present we greatly prefer the sea to all our relations. I dare say you will spend a very pleasant three weeks in town. I hope you will see everything worthy notice, from the Opera House to Henry's office in Cleveland Court; and I shall expect you to lay in a stock of intelligence that may procure me amusement for a twelvemonth to come. You will have a turkey from Steventon while you are there, and pray note down how many full courses of exquisite dishes M. Halavant converts it into. I cannot write any closer. Neither my affection for you nor for letter-writing can stand out against a Kentish visit. For a three months' absence I can be a very loving relation and a very excellent correspondent, but beyond that I degenerate into negligence and indifference. I wish you a very pleasant ball on Thursday, and myself another, and Mary and Martha a third, but they will not have theirs till Friday, as they have a scheme for the Newbury Assembly. Nanny's husband is decidedly against her quitting service in such times as these, and I believe would be very glad to have her continue with us. In some respects she would be a great comfort, and in some we should wish for a different sort of servant. The washing would be the greatest evil. Nothing is settled, however, at present with her, but I should think it would be as well for all parties if she could suit herself in the meanwhile somewhere nearer her husband and child than Bath. Mrs H. Rice's place would be very likely to do for her. It is not many, as she is herself aware, that she is qualified for. My mother has not been so well for many months as she is now. Adieu. Yours sincerely, JA.

Miss Austen
Godmersham Park
Faversham
Kent

33
(domenica 25 gennaio 1801) - no ms.
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Steventon domenica 25 gennaio

Non ho niente da dire su Manydown, ma scrivo perché ti aspetterai notizie da me, e perché se avessi indugiato un altro giorno o due, presumo che la tua visita a Goodnestone avrebbe fatto arrivare la mia lettera troppo tardi. Ritengo che sarò a M. entro questa settimana, ma dato che la cosa non è certa metti l'indirizzo di casa. Mi serviranno due nuovi abiti colorati per l'estate, perché quello rosa non potrà fare altro che portarmi via da Steventon. Comunque, non ti chiederò che di prendermene uno, che dovrà essere di semplice mussolina di cotone marrone, per un vestito da giorno; l'altro, che dovrà essere di un bel giallo striato di bianco, intendo comprarlo a Bath. Comprane due marroni, se ti va, entrambi della stessa lunghezza, ma uno più lungo dell'altro - è per una donna alta. Sette iarde per la mamma, sette iarde e mezzo per me; un marrone scuro, ma il punto di marrone lo lascio scegliere a te, e preferirei che fossero diversi, così ci sarà sempre qualcosa da dire, da discutere su quale sia il più bello. Devono essere di mussolina di cotone. Vi piace questo freddo? Presumo che l'abbiate tutti ardentemente desiderato come un sollievo salutare dopo l'orribile e malsana mitezza della stagione che l'ha preceduto, sentendovi quasi putrefatti per la sua mancanza, e che ora siate tutti accanto al fuoco, lamentandovi di non aver mai sentito prima un freddo così pungente, che siate tutti quasi morti dalla fame, completamente congelati, e che vorreste con tutto il cuore che quella mitezza tornasse. Giovedì scorso la tua sfortunata sorella si è trovata ad affrontare una situazione estremamente difficile. Ero arrivata ad Ashe Park prima del Gruppo di Deane, e sono rimasta chiusa in salotto per dieci minuti da sola con Mr Holder. Mi era venuto in mente di chiedere di far venire la governante o Mary Corbett, e nulla poteva costringermi a muovere due passi dalla porta, sulla cui maniglia tenevo ben stretta una mano. Non c'era nessun altro tranne noi, abbiamo di nuovo giocato a ventuno, e c'è stato molto trambusto. (1) Venerdì ho concluso i miei quattro giorni di bagordi incontrando William Digweed a Deane, e, in fin dei conti, sto abbastanza bene, ti ringrazio. Mentre ero là un'improvvisa tormenta di neve ha reso la strada impraticabile, e ha fatto sì che il mio ritorno a casa in calesse fosse molto più semplice e gradevole dell'andata. Fulwar ed Eliza sono partiti ieri da Deane. Sarai lieta di sapere che Mary prenderà un'altra cameriera. Immagino che Sally sia troppo occupata nei lavori domestici per trovare il tempo di fare tutto, e Mary pensa che Edward non stia all'aria aperta quanto dovrebbe; ci deve perciò essere una ragazza che si occupi del bambino. Non scommetterei sulla possibilità che Mr Rice ottenga il beneficio di Deane; ripone le proprie speranze, ritengo, non su qualcosa che ha scritto la madre, ma sull'effetto di ciò che ha scritto lui stesso. Deve scrivere molto meglio di quanto indichino i suoi occhi se riesce a convincere una donna testarda e di mentalità ristretta a fare una cortesia a gente che non ama. Tuo fratello Edward ti menziona in modo molto edificante, te l'assicuro, nella sua lettera a James, e sembra proprio dispiaciuto di doversi separare da te. Per me è di grande consolazione pensare che le mie cure non sono state gettate al vento, e che hai conquistato il rispetto del mondo. Forse riuscirà a convincerti a tornare con lui ed Elizabeth nel Kent, quando ci lasceranno ad aprile, e mi viene il sospetto che il tuo grande desiderio di mantenerti libera sia collegato a questa prospettiva. Fai come vuoi; ho superato la mia voglia di vederti venire a Bath con la mamma e me. Non c'è nulla di impossibile per la forza d'animo. Edward Cooper è così gentile da invitarci tutti a Hamstall questa estate, invece di andare al mare, ma noi non siamo così gentili da avere l'intenzione di farlo. L'estate successiva, se ti va, Mr Cooper, ma per il momento preferiamo di gran lunga il mare a tutte le nostre conoscenze. Immagino che passerai tre settimane molto piacevoli in città. Spero che tu veda tutto ciò che è degno di essere visto, dal Teatro dell'Opera all'ufficio di Henry a Cleveland Court; e mi aspetto che tu faccia provvista di informazioni che possano divertirmi per almeno un anno. Quando sarai là mangerai un tacchino di Steventon, e ti prego di prendere nota di quante portate di piatti squisiti ne ricaverà M. Halavant. Non riesco a scrivere nulla di più intimo. Né il mio affetto per te né quello per scrivere lettere può paragonarsi a una visita nel Kent. Per un'assenza di tre mesi posso essere una sorella affettuosissima e un'ottima corrispondente, ma oltre cado nella negligenza e nell'indifferenza. Per giovedì ti auguro un ballo molto piacevole, e per me un altro, e per Mary e Martha un altro ancora, ma loro non ci andranno fino a venerdì, dato che hanno un progetto per la Newbury Assembly. Il marito di Nanny è decisamente contrario a che lei lasci il servizio in tempi come questi, e credo che sarebbe molto lieto se continuasse a stare da noi. Per certi aspetti sarebbe una gran comodità, e per altri ci farebbe piacere un genere diverso di domestica. Il bucato sarebbe il maggiore inconveniente. Con lei, comunque, al momento non c'è nulla di preciso, ma immagino che sarebbe meglio per tutti se nel frattempo potesse sistemarsi in qualche posto più vicino al marito e alla figlia rispetto a Bath. Il posto da Mrs H. Rice sarebbe perfetto per lei. Non è da molto, lei stessa ne è consapevole, che ha i requisiti per averlo. La mamma ora sta bene come non stava da molti mesi. Adieu. Sinceramente tua, JA.



(1) Ashe Park era la residenza degli Holder e il gruppo di Deane comprendeva presumibilmente James Austen con la moglie Mary e la sorella di quest'ultima, Eliza, con il marito, il rev. Fulwar-Craven Fowle, notoriamente molto irascibile quando perdeva al gioco.

34
(Wednesday 11 February 1801)
Cassandra Austen, London


Manydown Wednesday Feb:ry 11th.

My dear Cassandra

As I have no Mr Smithson to write of I can date my letters. - Yours to my Mother has been forwarded to me this morning, with a request that I would take on me the office of acknowledging it. I should not however have thought it necessary to write so soon, but for the arrival of a letter from Charles to myself. - It was written last Saturday from off the Start, & conveyed to Popham Lane by Captn Boyle in his way to Midgham. He came from Lisbon in the Endymion, & I will copy Charles' account of his conjectures about Frank. - "He has not seen my brother lately, nor does he expect to find him arrived, as he met Capt: Inglis at Rhodes going up to take command of the Petterel as he was coming down, but supposes he will arrive in less than a fortnight from this time, in some ship which is expected to reach England about that time with dispatches from Sir Ralph Abercrombie." - The event must shew what sort of a Conjuror Capt: Boyle is. - The Endymion has not been plagued with any more prizes. - Charles spent three pleasant days in Lisbon. - They were very well satisfied with their Royal Passenger, whom they found fat, jolly & affable, who talks of Ly Augusta as his wife & seems much attached to her. - When this letter was written, the Endymion was becalmed, but Charles hoped to reach Portsmouth by monday or tuesday; & as he particularly enquires for Henry's direction, you will e'er long I suppose receive further intelligence of him. - He received my letter, communicating our plans, before he left England, was much surprised of course, but is quite reconciled to them, & means to come to Steventon once more while Steventon is ours. - Such I beleive are all the particulars of his Letter, that are worthy of travelling into the Regions of Wit, Elegance, fashion, Elephants & Kangaroons. My visit to Miss Lyford begins tomorrow, & ends on Saturday, when I shall have an opportunity of returning here at no expence as the Carriage must take Cath: to Basingstoke. - She meditates your returning into Hampshire together, & if the Time should accord, it would not be undesirable. She talks of staying only a fortnight, & as that will bring your stay in Berkeley Street to three weeks, I suppose you would not wish to make it longer. - Do not let this however retard your coming down, if you had intended a much earlier return. - I suppose whenever you come, Henry would send you in his Carriage a stage or two, where you might be met by John, whose protection you would we imagine think sufficient for the rest of your Journey. He might ride on the Bar, or might even sometimes meet with the accomodation of a sunday-chaise. - James has offered to meet you anywhere, but as that would be to give him trouble without any counterpoise of convenience, as he has no intention of going to London at present on his own account, we suppose that you would rather accept the attentions of John. - We spend our time here as quietly as usual. One long morning visit is what generally occurs, & such a one took place yesterday. We went to Baugherst. - The place is not so pretty as I expected, but perhaps the Season may be against the beauty of Country. The house seemed to have all the comforts of little Children, dirt & litter. Mr Dyson as usual looked wild, & Mrs Dyson as usual looked big. - Mr Bramston called here the morning before, - et voila tout. - I hope you are as well satisfied with having my coloured Muslin gown as a white one. Everybody sends their Love - & I am sincerely Yours,

J A.

Miss Austen
24, Upper Berkeley Street
Portman Square
London

34
(mercoledì 11 febbraio 1801)
Cassandra Austen, Londra


Manydown mercoledì 11 feb. 1801

Mia cara Cassandra

Dato che non ho nessun Mr Smithson di cui scrivere io posso datare le mie lettere. - La tua alla mamma mi è stata inoltrata stamattina, con la richiesta di occuparmi di accusarne ricevuta. Tuttavia non avrei ritenuto necessario scrivere così in fretta, se non fosse stato per l'arrivo di una lettera di Charles a me. - È stata scritta sabato scorso al largo dello Start Point, e portata a Popham Lane dal Cap. Boyle che andava a Midgham. È venuto da Lisbona sull'Endymion, e ti copio il resoconto delle sue ipotesi su Frank. - "Non ha visto Frank di recente, né si aspetta che sia tornato, visto che ha incontrato il Cap. Inglis a Rodi che si accingeva ad assumere il comando della Petterel non appena lui fosse sbarcato, ma suppone che arriverà entro una quindicina di giorni, su una qualche nave che ci si aspetta raggiunga l'Inghilterra in quel periodo con dei dispacci da Sir Ralph Abercrombie." - Il fatto dimostra che razza di cospiratore sia il Cap. Boyle. - La Endymion non è stata afflitta da nessun premio. - Charles ha passato tre giorni piacevoli a Lisbona. - Sono rimasti molto soddisfatti del loro Passeggero Reale, che hanno trovato grasso, giocondo e affabile, e che parla di Lady Augusta come se fosse sua moglie e sembra esserle molto legato. - Quando è stata scritta la lettera la Endymion era in bonaccia, ma Charles sperava di raggiungere Portsmouth entro lunedì o martedì; e dato che chiede in modo particolare dove sia Henry, immagino che fra non molto avrai sue ulteriori notizie. - Ha ricevuto la mia lettera, che conteneva i nostri progetti, prima di lasciare l'Inghilterra, naturalmente è rimasto molto sorpreso, ma pare che li abbia completamente assimilati, e intende venire a Steventon ancora una volta mentre Steventon è nostra. - Credo che i particolari della sua Lettera ci siano tutti, almeno quelli degni di viaggiare nelle Regioni dell'Ingegno, dell'Eleganza, della moda, degli Elefanti e dei Canguri. (1) La mia visita a Miss Lyford comincia domani, e finisce sabato, quando avrò l'opportunità di tornare qui senza spendere nulla visto che la Carrozza deve portare Catherine a Basingstoke. - Sta meditando di tornare nell'Hampshire insieme a te, e se i Tempi saranno quelli giusti, non sarebbe sbagliato. Dice che starà solo un paio di settimane, e dato che ciò porterebbe la tua permanenza a Berkeley Street a tre settimane, immagino che non ti andrebbe di prolungarla oltre. - Non permettere comunque che la cosa ritardi il tuo ritorno, se lo avevi programmato per molto prima. - Suppongo che quando partirai, Henry ti offrirà la sua Carrozza per una tappa o due, fin dove potresti incontrare John, la cui protezione immaginiamo che tu ritenga sufficiente per il resto del Viaggio. Lui potrebbe viaggiare a Cassetta, o magari potrebbe anche trovare da accomodarsi in una carrozza domenicale. (2) - James si è offerto di venirti a prendere ovunque, ma visto che significherebbe farlo scomodare senza che ne derivi alcuna contropartita utile, e che al momento non prevede di avere motivi suoi per recarsi a Londra, supponiamo che preferirai accettare l'assistenza di John. Qui passiamo il tempo con la solita tranquillità. Generalmente capita una lunga visita mattutina, e ce n'è stata una ieri. Siamo andate a Baugherst. - È un posto non così bello come mi ero aspettata, ma forse la Stagione non è la più adatta alla bellezza del Luogo. La casa sembrava avere tutte le comodità derivanti da Bambini piccoli, sporcizia e concime. Mr Dyson appariva come al solito selvatico, e Mrs Dyson come al solito incinta. - Mr Bramston era venuto a trovarci il giorno prima, - et voila tout. - Spero che tu sia pienamente soddisfatta dall'avere il mio vestito di Mussolina colorata così come uno bianco. Ti mandano tutti i loro saluti affettuosi - e io sono sinceramente, la Tua

J A.



(1) Le Faye annota: "Cassandra aveva probabilmente raccontato a JA di una sua visita allo zoo di Exeter Change, uno dei posti più famosi di Londra."

(2) A proposito di "sunday-chaise" Le Faye precisa: "Unexplained"; magari JA intendeva dire che se avessero viaggiato di domenica la carrozza sarebbe stata abbastanza vuota da permettere a John di accomodarsi all'interno.

35
(Tuesday 5 - Wednesday 6 May 1801)
Cassandra Austen, Ibthorpe


Paragon - Tuesday May 5th

My dear Cassandra

I have the pleasure of writing from my own room up two pair of stairs, with everything very comfortable about me. Our Journey here was perfectly free from accident or Event; we changed Horses at the end of every stage, & paid at almost every Turnpike; - we had charming weather, hardly any Dust, & were exceedingly agreeable, as we did not speak above once in three miles. - Between Luggershall & Everley we made our grand Meal, & then with admiring astonishment perceived in what a magnificent manner our support had been provided for -;- We could not with the utmost exertion consume above the twentieth part of the beef. - The cucumber will I believe be a very acceptable present, as my Uncle talks of having enquired the price of one lately, when he was told a shilling. - We had a very neat chaise from Devizes; it looked almost as well as a Gentleman's, at least as a very shabby Gentleman's -; inspite of this advantage however We were above three hours coming from thence to Paragon, & it was half after seven by Your Clocks before we entered the house. Frank, whose black head was in waiting in the Hall window, received us very kindly; and his Master & Mistress did not show less cordiality. - They both look very well, tho' my Aunt has a violent cough. We drank tea as soon as we arrived, & so ends the account of our Journey, which my Mother bore without any fatigue. - How do you do to-day? - I hope you improve in sleeping - I think you must, because I fall off; - I have been awake ever since 5 & sooner; I fancy I had too much clothes over my stomach; I thought I should by the feel of them before I went to bed, but I had not courage to alter them. - I am warmer here without any fire than I have been lately with an excellent one. - Well - & so the Good news is confirmed, & Martha triumphs. - My Uncle & Aunt seemed quite surprised that you & my father were not coming sooner. - I have given the Soap & the Basket; - & each have been kindly received. - One thing only among all our Concerns has not arrived in safety; - when I got into the Chaise at Devizes I discovered that your Drawing Ruler was broke in two; - it is just at the Top where the crosspeice is fastened on. - I beg pardon. - There is to be only one more Ball; - next monday is the day. - The Chamberlaynes are still here; I begin to think better of Mrs. C-, and upon recollection beleive she has rather a long chin than otherwise, as she remembers us in Gloucestershire when we were very charming young Women. - The first veiw of Bath in fine weather does not answer my expectations; I think I see more distinctly thro' Rain. - The Sun was got behind everything, and the appearance of the place from the top of Kingsdown, was all vapour, shadow, smoke, & confusion. - I fancy we are to have a House in Seymour St or thereabouts. My Uncle & Aunt both like the situation -. I was glad to hear the former talk of all the Houses in New King St as too small; - it was my own idea of them. - I had not been two minutes in the Dining-room before he questioned me with all his accustomary eager interest about Frank & Charles, their veiws & intentions. - I did my best to give information. - I am not without hopes of tempting Mrs Lloyd to settle in Bath; - Meat is only 8d per pound, butter 12d, & cheese 9½d. You must carefully conceal from her however the exorbitant price of Fish; - a salmon has been sold at 2s: 9d pr pound the whole fish. - The Duchess of York's removal is expected to make that article more reasonable - & till it really appears so, say nothing about salmon. - Tuesday Night. - When my Uncle went to take his second glass of water, I walked with him, & in our morning's circuit we looked at two Houses in Green Park Buildings, one of which pleased me very well. - We walked all over it except into the Garrets; - the dining-room is of a comfortable size, just as large as you like to fancy it, the 2d room about 14 ft. square; - The apartment over the Drawing-room pleased me particularly, because it is divided into two, the smaller one a very nice-sized Dressing-room, which upon occasion might admit a bed. The aspect is South-East. - The only doubt is about the Dampness of the Offices, of which there were symptoms. -

Wednesday. - Mrs Mussell has got my Gown, & I will endeavour to explain what her intentions are. - It is to be a round Gown, with a Jacket & a Frock front, like Cath: Bigg's to open at the side. - The Jacket is all in one with the body, & comes as far as the pocketholes; - about half a quarter of a yard deep I suppose all the way round, cut off straight at the corners with a broad hem. - No fullness appears either in the body or the flap; the back is quite plain, in this form; - - and the sides equally so. - The front is sloped round to the bosom & draw in - & there is to be a frill of the same to put on occasionally when all one's handkercheifs are dirty - which frill must fall back. - She is to put two breadths & a-half in the tail, & no Gores; - Gores not being so much worn as they were; - there is nothing new in the sleeves, - they are to be plain, with a fullness of the same falling down & gathered up underneath, just like some of Marthas - or perhaps a little longer. - Low in the back behind, & a belt of the same. - I can think of nothing more - tho' I am afraid of not being particular enough. - My Mother has ordered a new Bonnet, & so have I; - both white chip, trimmed with white ribbon. - I find my straw bonnet looking very much like other peoples, & quite as smart. - Bonnets of Cambric Muslin on the plan of Ly Bridges' are a good deal worn, & some of them are very pretty; but I shall defer one of that sort till your arrival. - Bath is getting so very empty that I am not afraid of doing too little. - Black gauze Cloaks are worn as much as anything. - I shall write again in a day or two. - Best love.

Yrs Ever JA.

We have had Mrs Lillingstone & the Chamberlaynes to call on us. - My Mother was very much struck with the odd looks of the two latter; I have only seen her. Mrs Busby drinks tea & plays at Cribbage here tomorrow; & on friday I beleive we go to the Chamberlaynes. - Last night we walked by the Canal.

Miss Austen
Mrs Lloyd
Up Hurstbourne
Andover

35
(martedì 5 - mercoledì 6 maggio 1801)
Cassandra Austen, Ibthorpe


Paragon - martedì 5 maggio

Mia cara Cassandra

Ho il piacere di scrivere da una stanza tutta per me in cima a due rampe di scale, con tutte le comodità a portata di mano. Il Viaggio è stato completamente privo di incidenti o Eventi particolari; abbiamo cambiato i Cavalli al termine di ogni tappa, e pagato quasi a ogni Barriera; - il tempo è stato delizioso, quasi niente Polvere, e siamo stati benissimo, dato che non abbiamo parlato più di una volta ogni tre miglia. - Tra Luggershall e Everley abbiamo consumato il Pasto principale, e allora ci siamo rese conto con ammirato stupore con quale magnificenza si era provveduto a noi -;- Non abbiamo potuto consumare più di una ventesima parte del manzo anche applicandoci al massimo. - Credo che il cetriolo sarà un regalo molto ben accetto, dato che lo Zio dice di aver chiesto ultimamente il prezzo di uno, e gli hanno risposto uno scellino. - La carrozza da Devizes era molto elegante; sembrava quasi quella di un Gentiluomo, almeno di un Gentiluomo molto male in arnese -; nonostante questo vantaggio ci abbiamo messo comunque più di tre ore da lì a Paragon, (1) ed erano quasi le sette e mezza secondo i Vostri Orologi quando siamo entrate in casa. Frank, la cui testa nera era in attesa alla finestra dell'Ingresso, ci ha ricevute con molta cortesia; e il Padrone e la Padrona non hanno mostrato meno cordialità. - Hanno entrambi un ottimo aspetto, anche se la Zia ha una tosse molto forte. Abbiamo bevuto il tè appena arrivate, e così finisce il resoconto del nostro Viaggio, che la Mamma ha sopportato senza nessuna fatica. - Come stai oggi? - Spero che tu stia andando meglio con il sonno - credo che debba essere così, perché io casco dal sonno; - sono sveglia dalla 5 e anche prima; immagino perché avevo troppe coperte sulla pancia; l'avevo pensato che sarebbe andata così quando le ho viste prima di andare a letto, ma non ho avuto il coraggio di fare cambiamenti. - Ho più caldo qui senza fuoco di quanto ne avessi ultimamente con un fuoco eccellente. - Bene - e così le Buone nuove sono confermate, e Martha trionfa. (2) - Lo Zio e la Zia sembrano molto sorpresi che tu e il babbo non veniate prima. - Ho consegnato il Sapone e il Cesto; - entrambi sono stati cortesemente accettati. - Una sola cosa tra quelle a cui Tenevamo non è arrivata sana e salva; - quando sono salita in Carrozza a Devizes ho scoperto che il tuo Regolo da Disegno si era spezzato in due; - è proprio in Cima dove è fissata la sbarretta di sostegno. - Ti chiedo scusa. - Ci sarà solo un Ballo; - il giorno è fissato per lunedì prossimo. - I Chamberlayne sono ancora qui; inizio a pensare meglio di Mrs C-, e ripensandoci credo che in realtà abbia il mento piuttosto lungo, dato che si ricorda di noi in Gloucestershire quando eravamo Giovinette incantevoli. (3) - Il primo impatto con Bath col tempo buono non corrisponde alle mie aspettative; penso che la vedrò più distintamente attraverso la Pioggia. - Il Sole faceva da sfondo a tutto, e dalla cima di Kingsdown l'aspetto del luogo, appariva tutto vapore, ombra, fumo e confusione. - Ho l'impressione che troveremo Casa in Seymour Street o nei paraggi. La posizione piace sia allo Zio che alla Zia -. Sono stata contenta di sentir dire allo Zio che tutte le Case di New King Street sono troppo piccole; - è proprio l'idea che me n'ero fatta io. - Non erano nemmeno due minuti che stavo in Sala da pranzo quando con la sua abituale premura mi ha chiesto di Frank e Charles, delle loro aspettative e delle loro intenzioni. - Ho fatto del mio meglio per dargli le informazioni. - Non ho perso la speranza di invogliare Mrs Lloyd a stabilirsi a Bath; - La Carne costa solo 8 pence a libbra, il burro 12, e il formaggio 9 pence e mezzo. Tuttavia devi stare attenta a nasconderle il prezzo esorbitante del Pesce; - un salmone intero è stato venduto a 2 scellini e 9 pence la libbra. - Si aspetta la partenza della Duchessa di York per portarlo a prezzi più ragionevoli - e finché non sarà effettivamente così, non dire nulla del salmone. - Martedì Sera. - Quando lo Zio è andato a bere il suo secondo bicchiere d'acqua, sono andata con lui, e nel nostro giro mattutino abbiamo visitato due Case in Green Park Buildings, una delle quali mi è piaciuta molto. L'abbiamo girata tutta salvo le Soffitte; la sala da pranzo è di dimensioni soddisfacenti, grande proprio come uno se l'aspetta, la 2ª stanza è un quadrato di circa 4 metri; - La camera sopra il Soggiorno mi è particolarmente piaciuta, perché è divisa in due, la parte più piccola è uno Spogliatoio molto ben proporzionato, che all'occasione può ospitare un letto. L'esposizione è a Sud-Est. - Il solo dubbio riguarda l'Umidità dei Servizi, della quale si notavano i segni. -

Mercoledì. - Mrs Mussell ha ritirato il mio Vestito, e cercherò di spiegarti quali sono le sue intenzioni. - Dovrà essere un Abito a ruota, con una Giacchetta e un Corpetto davanti, da aprire di lato come quello di Catherine Bigg. - La Giacchetta è tutt'uno con il busto, e arriva fino all'apertura delle tasche; - presumo larga circa mezzo quarto di iarda e che gira tutto intorno, tagliata dritta agli angoli con un bordo alto. - Nessuna ampiezza sia nel busto che nei risvolti; il dietro è semplicissimo, con questa forma; - - e i lati lo stesso. (4) - Il davanti è poggiato intorno al petto e si stringe - e ci sarà un piccolo foulard di pizzo della stessa stoffa da mettere occasionalmente quando uno ha tutti i fazzoletti sporchi - il quale foulard deve essere ripiegato. - Per lo strascico userà due ampiezze e mezzo, e nessun Gherone; - i Gheroni non si usano così tanto come una volta; - nelle maniche non c'è nulla di nuovo, - saranno semplici, con un'ampiezza della stessa stoffa che ricade e si raccoglie al di sotto, proprio come quelle di Martha - o forse un po' più lunghe. - Dietro a vita bassa, e una cintura della stessa stoffa. - Non mi viene in mente nient'altro - anche se temo di non essere stata abbastanza minuziosa. - La Mamma ha ordinato un Cappellino nuovo, e lo stesso ho fatto io; tutti e due di paglia bianca, bordati con un nastro bianco. - Trovo che il mio cappellino di paglia somigli molto a quello delle altre, ed è altrettanto elegante. - Si portano molto i Cappellini di Mussolina di Cotone sul tipo di quello di Lady Bridges, e qualcuno è molto carino, ma lo rimanderò fino al tuo arrivo. - Bath si sta talmente svuotando che non temo di fare troppo poco. - I Mantelli di velo nero si portano quanto qualsiasi altro. - Scriverò di nuovo tra un giorno o due. - I miei saluti più affettuosi.

Sempre Tua, JA.

Abbiamo ricevuto visite da Mrs Lillingstone e dai Chamberlayne. - La Mamma è rimasta molto colpita dall'aspetto strano di questi ultimi; io ho visto solo lei. Domani verrà Mrs Busby a prendere il tè e a giocare a Cribbage; e venerdì credo che andremo dai Chamberlayne. - Ieri sera abbiamo passeggiato lungo il Canale.



(1) La residenza di Bath degli zii di JA, James e Jane Leigh-Perrot, era al n. 1 di Paragon. JA e la madre erano andate da sole a Bath per cominciare a cercare una casa in affitto, mentre Cassandra era ospite di Mrs Lloyd a Ibthorpe (che JA scrive sempre "Ibthrop") e il padre era rimasto a Steventon a sistemare le ultime cose prima del trasferimento.

(2) Non si sa quale possa essere stato il "trionfo" di Martha; Le Faye ipotizza che possa trattarsi di un qualche causa legale andata a buon fine.

(3) JA si riferisce a un viaggio ad Adelstrop con la sorella nell'estate del 1794, dal cugino della madre, il rev. Thomas Leigh (1734-1813), figlio di William Leigh, quest'ultimo fratello dell'altro rev. Thomas Leigh (1696-1764), padre di Mrs Austen. I Chamberlayne erano vicini di casa e lontani cugini dei Leigh, ed evidentemente incontrarono le sorelle Austen che allora avevano ventuno (Cassandra) e diciannove (JA) anni.

(4) Sotto, lo schizzo originale nel manoscritto.

36
(Tuesday 12 - Wednesday 13 May 1801)
Cassandra Austen, Ibthorpe


Paragon Tuesday May 12th.

My dear Cassandra

My Mother has heard from Mary & I have heard from Frank; we therefore know something now of our concerns in distant quarters, & You I hope by some means or other are equally instructed, for I do not feel inclined to transcribe the letter of either. - You know from Elizabeth I dare say that my father & Frank, deferring their visit to Kippington on account of Mr M. Austen's absence are to be at Godmersham to day; & James I dare say has been over to Ibthrop by this time to enquire particularly after Mrs Lloyd's health, & forestall whatever intelligence of the Sale I might attempt to give. - sixty-one Guineas & a half for the three Cows gives one some support under the blow of only Eleven Guineas for the Tables. - Eight for my Pianoforte, is about what I really expected to get; I am more anxious to know the amount of my books, especially as they are said to have sold well. -

My Adventures since I wrote last, have not been very numerous; but such as they are, they are much at your service. - We met not a creature at Mrs Lillingstone's, & yet were not so very stupid as I expected, which I attribute to my wearing my new bonnet & being in good looks. - On sunday we went to Church twice, & after evening service walked a little in the Crescent fields, but found it too cold to stay long. Yesterday morning we looked into a House in Seymour St which there is reason to suppose will soon be empty, and as we are assured from many quarters that no inconvenience from the river is felt in those Buildings, we are at liberty to fix in them if we can; - but this house was not inviting; - the largest room downstairs, was not much more than fourteen feet square, with a western aspect. - In the evening I hope you honoured my Toilette & Ball with a thought; I dressed myself as well as I could, & had all my finery much admired at home. By nine o'clock my Uncle, Aunt & I entered the rooms & linked Miss Winstone on to us. - Before tea, it was rather a dull affair; but then the beforetea did not last long, for there was only one dance, danced by four couple. - Think of four couple, surrounded by about an hundred people, dancing in the upper Rooms at Bath! - After tea we cheered up; the breaking up of private parties sent some scores more to the Ball, & tho' it was shockingly & inhumanly thin for this place, there were people enough I suppose to have made five or six very pretty Basingstoke assemblies. - I then got Mr Evelyn to talk to, & Miss Twisleton to look at; and I am proud to say that I have a very good eye at an Adultress, for tho' repeatedly assured that another in the same party was the She, I fixed upon the right one from the first. - A resemblance to Mrs Leigh was my guide. She is not so pretty as I expected; her face has the same defect of baldness as her sister's, & her features not so handsome; - she was highly rouged, & looked rather quietly & contentedly silly than anything else. - Mrs Badcock & two young Women were of the same party, except when Mrs Badcock thought herself obliged to leave them, to run round the room after her drunken Husband. - His avoidance, & her pursuit, with the probable intoxication of both, was an amusing scene. - The Evelyns returned our visit on saturday; - we were very happy to meet, & all that; - they are going tomorrow into Gloucestershire, to the Dolphins for ten days. - Our acquaintance Mr Woodward is just married to a Miss Rowe, a young lady rich in money & music. - I thank you for your Sunday's letter, it is very long & very agreable -. I fancy you know many more particulars of our Sale than we do -; we have heard the price of nothing but the Cows, Bacon, Hay, Hops, Tables, & my father's Chest of Drawers & Study Table. - Mary is more minute in her account of their own Gains than in ours - probably being better informed in them. - I will attend to Mrs Lloyd's commission - & to her abhorrence of Musk when I write again. - I have bestowed three calls of enquiry on the Mapletons, & I fancy very beneficial ones to Marianne, as I am always told that she is better. I have not seen any of them. - Her complaint is a billious fever. - I like my dark gown very much indeed, colour, make, & everything. - I mean to have my new white one made up now, in case we should go to the rooms again next monday, which is to be really the last time. Wednesday. Another stupid party last night; perhaps if larger they might be less intolerable, but here there were only just enough to make one card table, with six people to look over, & talk nonsense to each other. Ly Fust, Mrs Busby & a Mrs Owen sat down with my Uncle to Whist within five minutes after the three old Toughs came in, & there they sat with only the exchange of Adm: Stanhope for my Uncle till their chairs were announced. - I cannot anyhow continue to find people agreable; - I respect Mrs Chamberlayne for doing her hair well, but cannot feel a more tender sentiment. - Miss Langley is like any other short girl with a broad nose & wide mouth, fashionable dress, & exposed bosom. - Adm: Stanhope is a gentlemanlike Man, but then his legs are too short, & his tail too long. - Mrs Stanhope could not come; I fancy she had a private appointment with Mr Chamberlayne, whom I wished to see more than all the rest. - My Uncle has quite got the better of his lameness, or at least his walking with a stick is the only remains of it. - He & I are soon to take the long-plann'd walk to the Cassoon - & on friday we are all to accompany Mrs Chamberlayne & Miss Langley to Weston. My Mother had a letter yesterday from my father; it seems as if the W. Kent scheme were entirely given up. - He talks of spending a fortnight at Godmersham & then returning to Town. -

Yrs Ever JA.

Excepting a slight cold, my Mother is very well; she has been quite free from feverish or billious complaints since her arrival here.

Miss Austen
Mrs Lloyd
Hurstbourn Tarrant
Andover

36
(martedì 12 - mercoledì 13 maggio 1801)
Cassandra Austen, Ibthorpe


Paragon martedì 12 maggio.

Mia cara Cassandra

La Mamma ha avuto notizie da Mary e io da Frank; quindi ora sappiamo qualcosa dei nostri interessi in ambienti lontani, e spero che Tu sia in qualche modo egualmente informata, perché non me la sento di trascrivere nessuna delle due lettere. - Immagino avrai saputo da Elizabeth che il babbo e Frank, avendo rinviato la loro visita a Kippington a causa dell'assenza di Mr M. Austen oggi arriveranno a Godmersham; e James immagino che al momento sia a Ibthrop per informarsi della salute di Mrs Lloyd, e anticipare qualsiasi informazione che io possa tentare di fornire. - sessantuno Ghinee e mezza per le tre Mucche danno un qualche sollievo dopo il colpo delle sole Undici Ghinee per i Tavoli. - Otto per il mio Pianoforte, è all'incirca quanto mi aspettavo di ricavare; sono molto impaziente di sapere l'ammontare per i miei libri, specialmente perché si dice che siano stati venduti bene. -

Le mie Avventure da quando ti ho scritto l'ultima volta, non sono state molto numerose; ma quali che siano, sono per la maggior parte a tuo beneficio. - Da Mrs Lillingstone non abbiamo incontrato anima viva, ma non ci siamo annoiati così tanto quanto mi aspettavo, cosa che attribuisco al fatto che indossavo il mio nuovo cappellino e avevo un bell'aspetto. - Domenica siamo andati due volte in Chiesa, e dopo la funzione pomeridiana abbiamo passeggiato un po' tra i campi del Crescent, ma faceva troppo freddo per restarci a lungo. Ieri mattina abbiamo esaminato una Casa a Seymour Street che c'è ragione di supporre sarà presto sfitta, e siccome in molti ci hanno assicurato che in quei Palazzi non ci sono inconvenienti derivanti dal fiume, se si può siamo liberi di stabilirci là; - ma la casa non era accogliente; - la stanza più grande, al pianterreno, non era molto più ampia di un quadrato di quattro metri di lato, con affaccio a ovest. - In serata spero che tu abbia onorato la mia Toilette e il mio Ballo con un pensiero; ero vestita al meglio delle mie possibilità, e mi ero messa tutti i fronzoli tanto ammirati a casa. All'incirca alle nove lo Zio, la Zia e io abbiamo fatto il nostro ingresso nelle sale e ci siamo uniti a Miss Winstone. - Prima del tè, è stata una faccenda piuttosto noiosa; d'altra parte il prima-del-tè non è durato a lungo, perché c'è stato un solo ballo, con quattro coppie. - Pensa a quattro coppie, circondate da un centinaio di persone, che ballano nelle upper Rooms a Bath! - Dopo il tè ci siamo rinfrancati; i piccoli gruppi si sono smembrati e ce n'era qualche dozzina in più per il Ballo, e benché fossero pochi in modo scandaloso e inumano per il luogo, c'era gente sufficiente a riempire sei o sette piacevoli riunioni a Basingstoke. - Io allora ho avuto Mr Evelyn per chiacchierare, e Miss Twisleton da rimirare; e sono orgogliosa di dire che ho molto buon occhio per le Adultere, (1) visto che nonostante mi avessero assicurata che era un'altra dello stesso gruppo a essere Lei, ho subito individuato quella giusta alla prima occhiata. - Sono stata guidata dalla somiglianza con Mrs Leigh. Non è così graziosa come mi sarei aspettata; la testa tende alla calvizie come quella della sorella, e i lineamenti non sono altrettanto belli: - era molto imbellettata, e più che altro dava l'impressione di una placida e soddisfatta stupidità. - Mrs Badcock e due Signorine erano nello stesso gruppo, salvo che Mrs Badcock è stata costretta ad allontanarsi, per correre dietro al Marito ubriaco. - I tentativi di evitarla da parte di lui, e quelli di inseguirlo da parte di lei, con probabile ebbrezza per entrambi, sono stati una scena divertente. Sabato gli Evelyn hanno ricambiato la visita; - eravamo molto felici di vederli, e tutto il resto; - domani andranno per dieci giorni nel Gloucestershire, dai Dolphin. - Il nostro conoscente Mr Woodward si è appena sposato con una certa Miss Rowe, una signorina con facoltà pecuniarie e musicali. - Ti ringrazio per la lettera di domenica, molto lunga e molto bella -. Immagino che tu conosca molti più particolari della Vendita rispetto a noi -; non abbiamo saputo il prezzo di nulla se non delle Mucche, della Pancetta, del Fieno, del Luppolo, dei Tavoli, e del Cassettone e della Scrivania del babbo. - Mary è più minuziosa nel resoconto dei loro Guadagni piuttosto che dei nostri - probabilmente perché meglio informata circa i primi. - Mi occuperò della commissione di Mrs Lloyd - e della sua avversione per il Musk (2) quando scriverò di nuovo. Ho fatto visita tre volte ai Mapleton per chiedere notizie, e immagino che abbiano avuto un effetto molto positivo su Marianne, visto che mi hanno sempre detto che stava meglio. Non ho visto nessuno di loro. - Il suo disturbo è una febbre biliare. Il mio vestito scuro mi piace davvero moltissimo, il colore, la fattura, e tutto il resto. - Ora voglio tenere pronto quello bianco, nel caso lunedì prossimo dovessimo andare di nuovo all'Assembly Rooms, che sarà in effetti l'ultima volta. Mercoledì. Ieri sera un altro stupido ricevimento; se più nutrito forse sarebbe stato meno insopportabile, ma qui ce n'era a sufficienza solo per fare un tavolo da gioco, con sei persone da passare in rassegna, e chiacchiere senza senso l'uno con l'altro. Lady Fust, Mrs Busby e una certa Mrs Owen si sono sedute con lo Zio al tavolo di Whist dopo cinque minuti dall'arrivo di queste tre vecchie Cariatidi, e là sono rimaste scambiando solo lo Zio con l'Amm. Stanhope fino a quando non sono state annunciate le loro carrozze. Non posso proprio continuare a farmi piacere le persone; - rispetto Mrs Chamberlayne perché ha delle belle acconciature, ma non riesco a provare sentimenti più teneri di questi. - Miss Langley è come tutte le altre ragazze basse col naso grosso e la bocca larga, vestite alla moda, e col petto ben in vista. - l'Amm. Stanhope è un Uomo molto distinto, ma d'altro canto ha le gambe troppo corte, e la marsina troppo lunga. - Mrs Stanhope non è potuta venire; immagino che avesse un appuntamento riservato con Mr Chamberlayne, che avrei desiderato vedere più di tutti gli altri. - Lo Zio ha avuto la meglio sulla sua debolezza di gambe, o almeno l'unico strascico è il fatto che debba camminare con un bastone. - Lui e io faremo a breve la passeggiata alla Cisterna (3) programmata da tempo - e venerdì accompagneremo tutti Mrs Chamberlayne e Miss Langley a Weston. Ieri la Mamma ha ricevuto una lettera del babbo; sembra come se il progetto del viaggio nel Kent occidentale sia del tutto abbandonato. - Lui parla di passare una ventina di giorni a Godmersham e poi tornare in Città. -

Sempre tua, JA.

Salvo un lieve raffreddore, la Mamma sta molto bene; da quando siamo arrivate qui non ha più avuto né febbre né disturbi biliari.



(1) Miss Twisleton, allora Mrs Ricketts, nel 1797 era stata scoperta con l'amante, Charles-William Taylor, nella casa di lui a Londra, e aveva divorziato nel 1799. La nonna materna era una Leigh, figlia di un fratello del padre di Mrs Austen.

(2) "Musk" significa anche "muschio", ma credo che JA si riferisca al profumo (magari legato alla commissione di cui parla nella frase precedente), che è definito così dall'OED: "A reddish brown substance with a strong, persistent odour secreted by a gland of the male musk deer, esp. Moschus moschiferus, and highly prized in perfumery. Also: any of various substances secreted by other mammals, esp. for scent marking." Per il "musk" profumo non ho trovato la traduzione italiana.

(3) Il "Caisson" (non "Cassoon" come scrive JA) era quello che restava (il bacino di drenaggio) di un sistema di chiuse la cui costruzione non era andata a buon fine.

37
(Thursday 21 - Friday 22 May 1801)
Cassandra Austen, Kintbury


Paragon Thursday May 21st

My dear Cassandra

To make long sentences upon unpleasant subjects is very odious, & I shall therefore get rid of the one now uppermost in my thoughts as soon as possible. - Our veiws on G. P. Buildings seem all at an end; the observation of the damps still remaining in the offices of an house which has been only vacated a week, with reports of discontented families & putrid fevers, has given the coup de grace. - We have now nothing in veiw. - When you arrive, we will at least have the pleasure of examining some of these putrifying Houses again; - they are so very desirable in size & situation, that there is some satisfaction in spending ten minutes within them. - I will now answer the enquiries in your last letter. I cannot learn any other explanation of the coolness between my Aunt & Miss Bond than that the latter felt herself slighted by the former's leaving Bath last summer without calling to see her before she went. - It seems the oddest kind of quarrel in the World; they never visit, but I beleive they speak very civilly if they meet; My Uncle & Miss Bond certainly do. The 4 Boxes of Lozenges at 1s-1d-½ per box, amount as I was told to 4s-6d and as the sum was so trifling, I thought it better to pay at once than contest the matter. I have just heard from Frank; my father's plans are now fixed; you will see him at Kintbury on friday, and unless inconvenient to you We are to see you both here on Monday the 1st of June. - Frank has an invitation to Milgate which I beleive he means to accept. - Our party at Ly Fust's was made up of the same set of people that you have already heard of; the Winstones, Mrs Chamberlayne, Mrs Busby, Mrs Franklyn & Mrs Maria Somerville; yet I think it was not quite so stupid as the two preceding parties here. - The friendship between Mrs Chamberlayne & me which you predicted has already taken place, for we shake hands whenever we meet. Our grand walk to Weston was again fixed for Yesterday, & was accomplished in a very striking manner; Every one of the party declined it under some pretence or other except our two selves, & we had therefore a tete a tete; but that we should equally have had after the first two yards, had half the Inhabitants of Bath set off with us. - It would have amused you to see our progress; - we went up by Sion Hill, & returned across the fields; - in climbing a hill Mrs Chamberlayne is very capital; I could with difficulty keep pace with her - yet would not flinch for the World. - on plain ground I was quite her equal - and so we posted away under a fine hot sun, She without any parasol or any shade to her hat, stopping for nothing, & crossing the Church Yard at Weston with as much expedition as if we were afraid of being buried alive. - After seeing what she is equal to, I cannot help feeling a regard for her. - As to Agreableness, she is much like other people. - Yesterday Evening we had a short call from two of the Miss Arnolds, who came from Chippenham on Business; they are very civil, and not too genteel, and upon hearing that we wanted a House recommended one at Chippenham. - This morning we have been visited again by Mrs & Miss Holder; they wanted us to fix an evening for drinking tea with them, but my Mother's still remaining cold allows her to decline everything of the kind. - As I had a separate invitation however, I beleive I shall go some afternoon. It is the fashion to think them both very detestable, but they are so civil, & their gowns look so white and so nice (which by the bye my Aunt thinks an absurd pretension in this place) that I cannot utterly abhor them, especially as Miss Holder owns that she has no taste for Music. - After they left us, I went with my Mother to help look at some houses in New King Street, towards which she felt some kind of inclination - but their size has now satisfied her; - they were smaller than I expected to find them. One in particular out of the two, was quite monstrously little; - the best of the sittingrooms not so large as the little parlour at Steventon, and the second room in every floor about capacious enough to admit a very small single bed. - We are to have a tiny party here tonight ; I hate tiny parties - they force one into constant exertion. - Miss Edwards & her father, Mrs. Busby & her nephew Mr Maitland, & Mrs Lillingstone are to be the whole; - and I am prevented from setting my black cap at Mr Maitland by his having a wife & ten Children. - My Aunt has a very bad cough; do not forget to have heard about that when you come, & I think she is deafer than ever. My Mother's cold disordered her for some days, but she seems now very well; - her resolution as to remaining here, begins to give way a little; she will not like being left behind & will be glad to compound Matters with her enraged family. - You will be sorry to hear that Marianne Mapleton's disorder has ended fatally; she was beleived out of danger on Sunday, but a sudden relapse carried her off the next day. - So affectionate a family must suffer severely; & many a girl on early death has been praised into an Angel I beleive, on slighter pretensions to Beauty, Sense & Merit than Marianne. - Mr Bent seems bent upon being very detestable, for he values the books at only 70£. The whole World is in a conspiracy to enrich one part of our family at the expence of another. - Ten shillings for Dodsley's Poems however please me to the quick, & I do not care how often I sell them for as much. When Mrs Bramston has read them through I will sell them again. - I suppose You can hear nothing of your Magnesia. -

Friday. You have a nice day for your Journey in whatever way it is to be performed - whether in the Debary's Coach or on your own twenty toes. - When you have made Martha's bonnet you must make her a cloak of the same sort of materials; they are very much worn here, in different forms - many of them just like her black silk spencer, with a trimming round the armholes instead of Sleeves; - some are long before, & some long all round like C. Bigg's. - Our party last night supplied me with no new ideas for my Letter - Yrs Ever JA.

The Pickfords are in Bath & have called here. - She is the most elegant looking Woman I have seen since I left Martha - He is as raffish in his appearance as I would wish every Disciple of Godwin to be. - We drink tea tonight with Mrs Busby. - I scandalized her Nephew cruelly; he has but three Children instead of Ten. -

Best Love to everybody.

Miss Austen
The Rev:d F. C. Fowle's
Kintbury
Newbury

37
(giovedì 21 - venerdì 22 maggio 1801)
Cassandra Austen, Kintbury


Paragon giovedì 21 maggio

Mia cara Cassandra

Detesto molto fare lunghi discorsi su argomenti spiacevoli, e perciò mi sbarazzerò il più presto possibile di quello che domina ora i miei pensieri. - Il nostro punto di vista su G. P. Buildings sembra arrivato a conclusione; aver visto l'umidità che permane nei servizi di una casa che è stata vuota una sola settimana, insieme alle notizie su famiglie insoddisfatte e su febbri infettive, ha dato il colpo di grazia. - Ora non abbiamo nulla in vista. - Quando arriverai, avremo almeno il piacere di esaminare di nuovo qualcuna di queste Case in putrefazione; hanno dimensioni e posizione così apprezzabili, che c'è una qualche soddisfazione nel passarci dentro dieci minuti. - Ora risponderò alle domande della tua ultima lettera. Non riesco a immaginare altra spiegazione della freddezza tra la Zia e Miss Bond se non che la seconda si sia sentita offesa dal fatto che la prima non sia andata a trovarla prima della sua partenza da Bath la scorsa estate. - Sembra il più bizzarro motivo di contrasto al Mondo; non si fanno visita, ma credo si parlino in modo molto civile quando si incontrano; Lo Zio e Miss Bond lo fanno sicuramente. Le 4 Scatolette di Pastiglie a 1 scellino e 1 penny e mezzo a scatoletta, fanno come mi hanno detto un totale di 4 scellini e 6 pence e dato che la somma era così insignificante, ho pensato fosse meglio pagare subito piuttosto che mettermi a questionare. Ho appena ricevuto notizie da Frank; i progetti del babbo ora sono definiti; lo incontrerai venerdì a Kintbury, e salvo che per te non sia scomodo vi vedremo entrambi lunedì 1° giugno. Frank ha un invito per Milgate che credo intenda accettare. - Al ricevimento da Lady Fust c'era lo stesso gruppo di persone di cui ti ho già parlato; i Winstone, Mrs Chamberlayne, Mrs Bursby, Mrs Franklyn e Mrs Maria Somerville; penso che non sia stato così mortalmente noioso come i due precedenti ricevimenti qui. - L'amicizia che avevi predetto tra Mrs Chamberlayne e me ha già avuto luogo, poiché ci stringiamo la mano ogni volta che ci incontriamo. La nostra grande passeggiata a Weston era di nuovo fissata per Ieri, ed è stata realizzata in maniera molto emozionante; Ciascuno del gruppo ha declinato con qualche scusa o altro salvo noi due, e abbiamo perciò avuto un tête-à-tête; ma è ciò che sarebbe egualmente successo dopo le prime due iarde, anche se metà degli Abitanti di Bath si fosse unita a noi. - Ti saresti divertita a guardare la nostra avanzata; - siamo salite lungo Sion Hill, e tornate attraverso i campi; - nello scalare una collina Mrs Chamberlayne è eccezionale; riuscivo con difficoltà a tenere il passo con lei - ma non mi sarei tirata indietro per niente al Mondo. - sul terreno pianeggiante riuscivo a eguagliarla - e così andavamo spedite sotto un bel sole cocente, Lei senza né parasole né altro che il cappello, senza mai fermarsi, e attraversando il Cimitero di Weston veloci come se temessimo di essere sepolte vive. - Dopo aver visto di che cosa è capace, non posso fare a meno di concederle un po' di stima. - Quanto alla Simpatia, è più o meno come tutti gli altri. - Ieri Sera abbiamo avuto una breve visita da due delle signorine Arnold, che sono venute da Chippenham per fare acquisti; sono molto cortesi, e non troppo raffinate, e avendo sentito che stavamo cercando casa ne hanno consigliata una a Chippenham. - Stamattina ci hanno di nuovo fatto visita Mrs e Miss Holder; volevano organizzare una serata da loro per il tè, ma il persistente raffreddore della Mamma le permette di rifiutare tutte le offerte di questo genere. Va di moda considerarle entrambe detestabili, ma sono così gentili, e i loro abiti hanno un aspetto così bianco e così carino (cosa che tra parentesi la Zia considera una presunzione ridicola qui) che non riesco a detestarle completamente, specialmente perché Miss Holder riconosce di non avere gusto per la Musica. - Quando la visita è finita, sono andata con la Mamma a dare un'occhiata a qualche casa in New King Street, che le aveva suscitato un qualche interesse - ma le dimensioni non l'hanno soddisfatta; - erano più minuscole di quanto mi ero aspettata. Una delle due in particolare era mostruosamente piccola; il salotto migliore era meno spazioso del salottino di Steventon, e nella seconda stanza di ogni piano ci sarebbe entrato a malapena un letto singolo molto piccolo. - Qui stasera ci sarà un piccolo ricevimento; odio i piccoli ricevimenti - ti costringono a uno sforzo incessante. - In tutto ci saranno Miss Edwards e suo padre, Mrs Busby e il nipote Mr Maitland, e Mrs Lillingstone; - e mi hanno avvertita di non mettere gli occhi addosso a Mr Maitland visto che ha una moglie e dieci Figli. - La Zia ha una tosse molto forte; non dimenticarti che lo sai quando arrivi, e credo che sia sorda come non mai. Il raffreddore ha infastidito la Mamma per qualche giorno, ma ora sembra che stia molto bene; - la sua determinazione a restare qui, inizia a un po' a venir meno; non vuole che le cose vadano per le lunghe e sarà contenta di sistemare le cose con la sua famiglia esasperata. - Ti dispiacerà sapere che la malattia di Marianne Mapleton ha avuto un esito fatale; domenica era stata considerata fuori pericolo, ma un'improvvisa ricaduta se l'è portata via il giorno dopo. - Per una famiglia così unità dev'essere una grande sofferenza; e credo che molte ragazze morte prematuramente siano state venerate come un Angelo, sulla base di pretese di Bellezza, Buonsenso e Merito molto minori di quelle di Marianne. - Mr Bent sembra propenso (1) a farsi detestare, visto che valuta i libri solo 70 sterline. Il Mondo intero sta cospirando per arricchire una parte della nostra famiglia a spese dell'altra. - Tuttavia dieci scellini per le poesie di Dodsley mi soddisfano appieno, e non m'importa di quanto spesso io le abbia vendute allo stesso prezzo. Quando Mrs Bramston le avrà lette da cima a fondo le venderò di nuovo. - Suppongo che tu non abbia saputo nulla della tua Magnesia. -

Venerdì. Passa una bella giornata durante il Viaggio in qualsiasi modo sarà compiuto - sia con la Carrozza dei Debary che sulle punte dei piedi. - Quando avrai finito il cappellino di Martha dovrai farle un mantello della stessa stoffa; qui si portano molto, in forme diverse - molti sono proprio come la sua giacchetta di seta nera, con una guarnizione intorno al giromanica invece che sulle Maniche; - alcuni sono lunghi davanti, e altri lunghi tutto intorno come quello di C. Bigg. - Il ricevimento di ieri sera non mi ha fornito nessuna idea per la Lettera - Sempre tua, JA.

I Pickford sono a Bath e sono venuti a farci visita. - Lei è la donna con l'aria più elegante che io abbia mai visto da quando ho lasciato Martha - Lui ha un aspetto volgare come avrei voluto fossero tutti i Discepoli di Godwin. - Stasera prendiamo il tè con Mrs Bursby. - Ho gravemente calunniato il Nipote; ha solo tre Figli invece di Dieci. -

I saluti più affettuosi a tutti.



(1) Nell'originale JA usa l'aggettivo "bent" ("propenso, incline") che è uguale al cognome di Mr Bent.

38
(Tuesday 26 - Wednesday 27 May 1801)
Cassandra Austen, Kintbury


Paragon - Tuesday May 26th

My dear Cassandra

For your letter from Kintbury & for all the compliments on my writing which it contained, I now return you my best thanks. - I am very glad that Martha goes to Chilton; a very essential temporary comfort her presence must afford to Mrs Craven, and I hope she will endeavour to make it a lasting one by exerting those kind offices in favour of the Young Man, from which you were both with-held in the case of the Harrison family by the mistaken tenderness of one part of ours. - The Endymion came into Portsmouth on Sunday, & I have sent Charles a short letter by this day's post. - My adventures since I wrote to you three days ago have been such as the time would easily contain; I walked yesterday morning with Mrs Chamberlayne to Lyncombe & Widcombe, and in the evening I drank tea with the Holders. - Mrs Chamberlayne's pace was not quite so magnificent on this second trial as in the first; it was nothing more than I could keep up with, without effort; & for many, many Yards together on a raised narrow footpath I led the way. - The Walk was very beautiful as my companion agreed, whenever I made the observation - And so ends our friendship, for the Chamberlaynes leave Bath in a day or two. - Prepare likewise for the loss of Lady Fust, as you will lose before you find her. - My evening visit was by no means disagreable. Mrs Lillingston came to engage Mrs Holder's conversation, & Miss Holder & I adjourned after tea into the inner Drawingroom to look over Prints & talk pathetically. She is very unreserved & very fond of talking of her deceased brother & Sister, whose memories she cherishes with an Enthusiasm which tho' perhaps a little affected, is not unpleasing. - She has an idea of your being remarkably lively; therefore get ready the proper selection of adverbs, & due scraps of Italian & French. - I must now pause to make some observation on Mrs Heathcote's having got a little Boy; - I wish her well to wear it out - & shall proceed: - Frank writes me word that he is to be in London tomorrow; some money Negociation from which he hopes to derive advantage, hastens him from Kent, & will detain him a few days behind my father in Town. - I have seen the Miss Mapletons this morning; Marianne was buried yesterday, and I called without expecting to be let in, to inquire after them all. - On the servant's invitation however I sent in my name, & Jane & Christiana who were walking in the Garden came to me immediately, and I sat with them about ten minutes. - They looked pale & dejected, but were more composed than I had thought probable. - When I mentioned your coming here on Monday, they said that they should be very glad to see you. - We drink tea tonight with Mrs Lysons; - Now this, says my Master will be mighty dull. - On friday we are to have another party, & a sett of new people to you. - The Bradshaws & Greaves's, all belonging to one another; & I hope the Pickfords. - Mrs Evelyn called very civilly on sunday, to tell us that Mr Evelyn had seen Mr Philips the proprietor of N° 12 G. P. B. and that Mr Philips was very willing to raise the kitchen floor; - but all this I fear is fruitless - tho' the water may be kept out of sight, it cannot be sent away, nor the ill effects of its' nearness be excluded. - I have nothing more to say on the subject of Houses; - except that we were mistaken as to the aspect of the one in Seymour Street, which instead of being due West is Northwest. - I assure you inspite of what I might chuse to insinuate in a former letter, that I have seen very little of Mr Evelyn since my coming here; I met him this morning for only the 4th time, & as to my anecdote about Sidney Gardens, I made the most of the Story because it came in to advantage, but in fact he only asked me whether I were to be at Sidney Gardens in the evening or not. - There is now something like an engagement between us & the Phaeton, which to confess my frailty I have a great desire to go out in; - whether it will come to anything must remain with him. - I really beleive he is very harmless; people do not seem afraid of him here, and he gets Groundsel for his birds & all that. - My Aunt will never be easy till she visits them; - she has been repeatedly trying to fancy a necessity for it now on our accounts, but she meets with no encouragement. - She ought to be particularly scrupulous in such matters, & she says so herself - but nevertheless - - - - Well - I am come home from Mrs Lysons as yellow as I went; - You cannot like your yellow gown half so well as I do, nor a quarter neither. Mr Rice & Lucy are to be married, one on the 9th & the other on the 10th of July. - Yrs affec:ly JA.

Wednesday. - I am just returned from my Airing in the very bewitching Phaeton & four, for which I was prepared by a note from Mr E. soon after breakfast: We went to the top of Kingsdown & had a very pleasant drive: One pleasure succeeds another rapidly - On my return I found your letter & a letter from Charles on the table. The contents of yours I suppose I need not repeat to you; to thank you for it will be enough. - I give Charles great credit for remembering my Uncle's direction, & he seems rather surprised at it himself. - He has received 30£ for his share of the privateer & expects 10£ more - but of what avail is it to take prizes if he lays out the produce in presents to his Sisters. He has been buying Gold chains & Topaze Crosses for us; - he must be well scolded. - The Endymion has already received orders for taking Troops to Egypt - which I should not like at all if I did not trust to Charles' being removed from her somehow or other before she sails. He knows nothing of his own destination he says, - but desires me to write directly as the Endymion will probably sail in 3 or 4 days. - He will receive my yesterday's letter to day, and I shall write again by this post to thank & reproach him. - We shall be unbearably fine. - I have made an engagement for you for Thursdav the 4th of June; if my Mother & Aunt should not go to the fireworks, which I dare say they will not, I have promised to join Mr Evelyn & Miss Wood - Miss Wood has lived with them you know ever "since my Son died -"

I will engage Mrs Mussell as you desire. She made my dark gown very well & may therefore be trusted I hope with Yours - but she does not always succeed with lighter Colours. - My white one I was obliged to alter a good deal. - Unless anything particular occurs, I shall not write again.

Miss Austen
The Rev:d F. C. Fowle's
Kintbury
Newbury

38
(martedì 26 - mercoledì 27 maggio 1801)
Cassandra Austen, Kintbury


Paragon - martedì 26 maggio

Mia cara Cassandra

Per la tua lettera da Kintbury e per tutti i complimenti che contiene sulla mia calligrafia, ti mando ora i miei migliori ringraziamenti. - Sono molto lieta che Martha vada a Chilton; la sua presenza sarà una consolazione provvisoria ma essenziale per Mrs Craven, e spero che farà di tutto per prolungarla esercitando quei gentili uffici in favore del Giovanotto, dai quali siete state entrambe trattenute dalla fraintesa tenerezza di una parte di noi nella faccenda della famiglia Harrison. (1) -La Endymion arriva domenica a Portsmouth, e ho mandato a Charles una breve lettera con la posta di oggi. - Le mie avventure da quando ti ho scritto tre giorni fa sono state tali da essere facilmente contenute in questo lasso di tempo; ieri mattina ho fatto una passeggiata a Lyncombe e Widcombe con Mrs Chamberlayne, e in serata ho preso il tè con gli Holder. - In questa seconda prova l'andatura di Mrs Chamberlayne non è stata affatto così magnifica come lo era stata nella prima; nulla di più di quanto fossi in grado di sostenere, senza sforzo; e per molte, moltissime Iarde percorse insieme in uno stretto sentiero ero io a essere in testa. - La Passeggiata è stata molto bella anche secondo la mia compagna, che si mostrava d'accordo ogni volta che facevo qualche commento - E così finisce la nostra amicizia, perché i Chamberlayne lasciano Bath tra un giorno o due. - Preparati anche alla perdita di Lady Fust, visto che la perderai prima di trovarla. - La mia visita serale non è stata affatto spiacevole. Mrs Lillingston si è impegnata in una conversazione con Mrs Holder, e Miss Holder e io ci siamo trasferite dopo il tè nel Salottino privato a passare in rassegna le Stampe e a fare una commovente chiacchierata. È molto aperta e le piace molto parlare del fratello e della Sorella morti, dei quali conserva il ricordo con un Entusiasmo che benché un po' affettato, non è sgradevole. - Si è messa in testa che tu abbia una conversazione straordinariamente brillante; perciò tieni pronta una selezione confacente di avverbi, insieme alla dovuta razione di italiano e francese. - Ora devo fare una pausa per inserire alcune osservazioni sul fatto che Mrs Heathcote abbia avuto un Bambino; - le auguro di essere capace di sopportarlo - e ora proseguo: - Frank mi scrive che domani sarà a Londra; una Trattativa d'affari dalla quale spera di ottenere dei vantaggi, sollecita la sua partenza dal Kent, e lo tratterrà per qualche giorno dopo che il babbo avrà lasciato Londra. - Stamattina ho visto le signorine Mapleton; Marianne è stata seppellita ieri, e ho fatto una visita senza aspettarmi di entrare in casa, per chiedere notizie di tutti loro. - Tuttavia su invito della domestica ho dato il mio nome, e Jane e Christiana che stavano passeggiando in Giardino sono venute immediatamente da me, e sono rimasta con loro per una decina di minuti. - Erano pallide e abbattute, ma avevano un aspetto più tranquillo di quanto mi sarei aspettata. - Quando ho accennato al fatto che lunedì saresti arrivata, hanno detto che sarebbero molto liete di vederti. - Stasera prenderemo il tè con Mrs Lysons; - Ciò, dice il mio Maestro sarà estremamente noioso. (2) - Venerdì avremo un altro ricevimento, e un gruppo di persone nuove per te. - I Bradshaw e i Greaves, tutti imparentati l'uno con l'altro; e spero anche i Pickford. - Domenica Mrs Evelyn è venuta molto gentilmente, per dirci che Mr Evelyn aveva visto Mr Philips il proprietario del N° 12 di Green Park Buildings e che Mr Philips avrebbe molto volentieri rialzato il pavimento della cucina; - ma credo che tutto ciò sia inutile - anche se l'acqua può essere nascosta alla vista, non può essere eliminata, né possono essere esclusi gli effetti negativi di averla nei pressi. - Non ho più nulla da dire sull'argomento Case; - salvo che ci eravamo sbagliati sull'affaccio di quella a Seymour Street, che invece di essere come doveva a Ovest è a Nordest. - Nonostante ciò che io possa aver insinuato in una lettera precedente, ti assicuro di aver visto molto poco Mr Evelyn da quando sono qui; l'ho incontrato stamattina per la quarta volta, e quanto al mio aneddoto sui Sidney Gardens, ho messo su la maggior parte della Storia perché mi conveniva, ma in realtà mi aveva solo chiesto se in serata sarei andata o no ai Sidney Gardens. - Ora c'è qualcosa come un impegno che coinvolge noi e il Phaeton, che a essere sinceri ho un gran desiderio di provare; - se ne sfocerà qualcosa dovrà essere con lui. - In realtà credo che sia davvero innocuo, la gente qui non sembra temerlo, e lui prende il Mangime per i suoi uccellini e cose del genere. - La Zia non si sentirà tranquilla finché non gli avrà fatto visita; - ha tentato ripetutamente di inventarsi una qualche necessità che ci riguarda per farlo, ma non ha avuto nessun incoraggiamento. - Dev'essere particolarmente scrupolosa in queste faccende, così dice - ma comunque... Be' - sono tornata a casa da Mrs Lysons gialla come ero partita; - Il tuo vestito giallo non può piacerti la metà di quanto piaccia a me, anzi nemmeno un quarto. Mr Rice e Lucy si stanno per sposare, uno il 9 e l'altra il 10 luglio. - Con affetto, JA.

Mercoledì. - Sono appena tornata dalla mia Scarrozzata nell'incantevole Phaeton a quattro, che mi era stata anticipata da un biglietto di Mr E. subito dopo la prima colazione: Siamo andati sulla cima di Kingsdown ed è stato un giro molto piacevole: Un piacere segue rapidamente all'altro - Al mio ritorno ho trovato sul tavolo la tua lettera e una di Charles. Il contenuto della tua presumo non sia necessario ripetertelo; un grazie sarà sufficiente. - Do volentieri atto a Charles di essersi ricordato di mandarmela dallo Zio, e anche lui ne sembra piuttosto sorpreso. - Ha ricevuto 30 sterline come sua parte di ufficiale e se ne aspetta altre 10 - ma a che serve avere un premio se lo usa per fare regali alle Sorelle. Ha comprato due Catenine d'oro con Croci di Topazio per noi; (3) - bisogna fargli una bella lavata di capo. - L'Endymion ha già ricevuto l'ordine di portare Truppe in Egitto - cosa che non gradirei affatto se non nutrissi la speranza che Charles venga in un modo o nell'altro trasferito prima della partenza. Dice di non sapere nulla circa la sua destinazione, - ma mi ha chiesto di scrivergli subito dato che l'Endymion salperà probabilmente fra due o tre giorni. - Oggi riceverà la mia lettera di ieri, e gli scriverò di nuovo con questo giro di posta per ringraziarlo e rimproverarlo. - Saremo insopportabilmente eleganti. - Ho preso un impegno per te per giovedì 4 giugno; se la Mamma e la Zia non dovessero andare per i fuochi d'artificio, (4) cosa che immagino non faranno, ho promesso di unirci a Mr Evelyn e Miss Wood - Come sai Miss Wood ha vissuto sempre con loro "da quando morì mio Figlio" -

Parlerò con Mrs Mussell come mi hai chiesto. Il mio vestito scuro l'ha fatto molto bene e quindi credo che tu possa fidarti per il Tuo - ma non ha sempre successo con i Colori chiari. - Quello mio bianco sono stata costretta a modificarlo un bel po'. - A meno che non succeda qualcosa di particolare, non scriverò più.



(1) Le Faye annota: "Questa oscura allusione potrebbe essere collegata all'accenno a Mary Harrison nella lettera 5." Il "giovanotto" citato prima dovrebbe essere uno dei figli del fratello di Mrs Lloyd, il rev. John Craven: Fulwar (1782-1860) o Charles-John (1784-1864).

(2) Chapman ipotizza una citazione dagli scritti johnsoniani di Mrs Piozzi (vedi la nota 1 alla lettera 21), ma aggiunge di non averla individuata.

(3) Le croci sono ora esposte nel Jane Austen's House Museum di Chawton.

(4) Il 4 giugno si festeggiava il compleanno di Giorgio III.

39
(Friday 14 September 1804)
Cassandra Austen, Ibthorpe


Lyme, Friday Sept. 14.

My dear Cassandra

I take the first sheet of this fine striped paper to thank you for your letter from Weymouth, & express my hopes of your being at Ibthrop before this time. I expect to hear that you reached it yesterday Evening, being able to get as far as Blandford on wednesday. - Your account of Weymouth contains nothing which strikes me so forcibly as there being no Ice in the Town; for every other vexation I was in some measure prepared; & particularly for your disappointment in not seeing the Royal Family go on board on tuesday, having already heard from Mr Crawford that he had seen you in the very act of being too late. But for there being no Ice, what could prepare me? - Weymouth is altogether a shocking place I perceive, without recommendation of any kind, & worthy only of being frequented by the inhabitants of Gloucester. - I am really very glad that we did not go there, & that Henry & Eliza saw nothing in it to make them feel differently. - You found my letter at Andover I hope, yesterday, & have now for many hours been satisfied that your kind anxiety on my behalf was as much thrown away as kind anxiety usually is. I continue quite well; in proof of which I have bathed again this morning. It was absolutely necessary that I should have the little fever & indisposition which I had; - it has been all the fashion this week in Lyme. Miss Anna Cove was confined for a day or two & her Mother thinks she was saved only by a timely Emetic (prescribed by Dr Robinson) from a serious illness; - & Miss Bonham has been under Mr Carpenter's care for several days, with a sort of nervous fever, and tho' she is now well enough to walk abroad, she is still very tall & does not come to the Rooms. - We all of us attended them, both on Wednesday Evening, & last Evening, I suppose I must say, or Martha will think Mr Peter Debary slighted. - My Mother had her pool of Commerce each night & divided the first with Le Chevalier, who was lucky enough to divide the other with somebody else. - I hope he will always win enough to empower him to treat himself with so great an indulgence as cards must be to him. He enquired particularly after you, not being aware of your departure. - We are quite settled in our Lodgings by this time as you may suppose, & everything goes on in the usual order. The servants behave very well & make no difficulties, tho' nothing certainly can exceed the inconvenience of the Offices, except the general Dirtiness of the House & furniture, & all its Inhabitants. - Hitherto the weather has been just what we could wish; - the continuance of the dry Season is very necessary to our comfort. - I endeavour as far as I can to supply your place, & be useful, & keep things in order; I detect dirt in the Water-decanter as fast as I can, & give the Cook physic, which she throws off her Stomach. I forget whether she used to do this, under your administration. - James is the delight of our lives; he is quite an uncle Toby's annuity to us. - My Mother's shoes were never so well blacked before, & our plate never looked so clean. He waits extremely well, is attentive, handy, quick & quiet, & in short has a great many more than all the cardinal virtues (for the cardinal virtues in themselves have been so often possessed that they are no longer worth having) - & amongst the rest, that of wishing to go to Bath, as I understand from Jenny. - He has the laudable thirst I fancy for Travelling, which in poor James Selby was so much reprobated; & part of his disappointment in not going with his Master, arose from his wish of seeing London. My Mother is at this moment reading a letter from my Aunt. Yours to Miss Irvine, of which she had had the perusal - (which by the bye, in your place I should not like) has thrown them into a quandary about Charles & his prospects. The case is, that my Mother had previously told my Aunt, without restriction, that a sloop (which my Aunt calls a Frigate) was reserved in the East for Charles; whereas you had replied to Miss Irvine's enquiries on the subject with less explicitness & more caution. - Never mind - let them puzzle on together - As Charles will equally go to the E. Indies, my Uncle cannot be really uneasy, & my Aunt may do what she likes with her frigates. - She talks a great deal of the violent heat of the Weather - We know nothing of it here. - My Uncle has been suffering a good deal lately; they mean however to go to Scarlets about this time, unless prevented by bad accounts of Cook. - The Coles have got their infamous plate upon our door. - I dare say that makes a great part of the massy plate so much talked of. - The Irvines' house is nearly completed - I believe they are to get into it on tuesday; - my Aunt owns it to have a comfortable appearance, & only "hopes the kitchen may not be damp". - I have not heard from Charles yet, which rather surprises me; - some ingenious addition of his own to the proper direction perhaps prevents my receiving his letter. I have written to Buller; - & I have written to Mr Pyne, on the subject of the broken Lid; - it was valued by Anning here, we were told at five shillings, & as that appeared to us beyond the value of all the Furniture in the room together, We have referred ourselves to the Owner. The Ball last night was pleasant, but not full for Thursday. My Father staid very contentedly till half-past nine - we went a little after eight - & then walked home with James & a Lanthorn, though I believe the Lanthorn was not lit, as the Moon was up. But this Lanthorn may sometimes be a great convenience to him. - My Mother & I staid about an hour later. Nobody asked me the two first dances - the two next I danced with Mr Crawford - & had I chosen to stay longer might have danced with Mr Granville, Mrs Granville's son - whom my dear friend Miss Armstrong offered to introduce to me - or with a new, odd looking Man who had been eyeing me for some time, & at last without any introduction asked me if I meant to dance again. - I think he must be Irish by his ease, & because I imagine him to belong to the Honble Barnwalls, who are the son, & son's wife of an Irish Viscount - bold queerlooking people, just fit to be Quality at Lyme. - Mrs Feaver & the Schuylers went away, I do not know where, last tuesday, for some days; & when they return, the Schuylers I understand are to remain here a very little while longer. - I called yesterday morning - (ought it not in strict propriety to be termed Yester-Morning?) on Miss Armstrong, & was introduced to her father & Mother. Like other young Ladies she is considerably genteeler than her Parents; Mrs Armstrong sat darning a pr of Stockings the whole of my visit -. But I do not mention this at home, lest a warning should act as an example. - We afterwards walked together for an hour on the Cobb; she is very converseable in a common way; I do not perceive Wit or Genius - but she has Sense & some degree of Taste, & her manners are very engaging. She seems to like people rather too easily - she thought the Downes pleasant &c &c. I have seen nothing of Mr & Mrs Mawhood. My Aunt mentions Mrs Holder's being returned from Cheltenham; so, her summer ends before theirs begins. - Hooper was heard of well at the Madeiras. - Eliza would envy him. - I need not say that we are particularly anxious for your next Letter, to know how you find Mrs Lloyd & Martha. - Say Everything kind for us to the latter - The former I fear must be beyond any remembrance of, or from, the Absent. - Yrs affec:ly

JA.

I hope Martha thinks you looking better than when she saw you in Bath. - Jenny has fasten'd up my hair to day in the same manner that she used to do up Miss Lloyd's, which makes us both very happy. -

Friday Eveng. -

The Bathing was so delightful this morning & Molly so pressing with me to enjoy myself that I believe I staid in rather too long, as since the middle of the day I have felt unreasonably tired. I shall be more careful another time, & shall not bathe tomorrow, as I had before intended. - Jenny & James are walked to Charmouth this afternoon; - I am glad to have such an amusement for him - as I am very anxious for his being at once quiet & happy. - He can read, & I must get him some books. Unfortunately he has read the 1st vol. of Robinson Crusoe. We have the Pinckards Newspaper however, which I shall take care to lend him. -

Miss Austen
Mrs Lloyd's
Up. Hurstbourn
Andover

39
(venerdì 14 settembre 1804)
Cassandra Austen, Ibthorpe


Lyme, venerdì 14 set.

Mia cara Cassandra

Uso il primo foglio di questa carta listata di fino (1) per ringraziarti della tua lettera da Weymouth, ed esprimere la speranza che tu sia già arrivata a Ibthrop. Mi aspetto di venire a sapere che sei arrivata ieri Sera, essendo arrivata mercoledì fino a Blandford. - La tua descrizione di Weymouth non contiene nulla che mi abbia colpito tanto quanto il fatto che in Città non ci fosse Ghiaccio; perché a tutti gli altri inconvenienti ero in qualche misura preparata; e in particolare alla tua delusione per non aver visto martedì salire a bordo la Famiglia Reale, (2) avendone già avuto notizia da Mr Crawford che ti aveva vista proprio nel momento del tuo arrivo in ritardo. Ma sulla mancanza di Ghiaccio, come potevo essere preparata? - Weymouth è un posto assolutamente disgustoso, me ne rendo conto, senza nessuna qualità, e degno solo di essere frequentato dagli abitanti di Gloucester. - Sono davvero molto contenta che non ci siamo andati, e che Henry ed Eliza non vi abbiano visto nulla che abbia fatto sorgere in loro sensazioni diverse. - Spero che ieri tu abbia trovato la mia lettera a Andover, e che adesso ti sia persuasa da molte ore che la tua gentile preoccupazione nei miei confronti era infondata come lo sono sempre le gentili preoccupazioni. Continuo a stare molto bene, e prova ne sia che stamane ho di nuovo fatto il bagno. Era assolutamente necessario che avessi quel po' di febbre e di malessere che ho avuto; - è stato molto di moda a Lyme in questa settimana. Miss Anna Cove è stata confinata a casa per un giorno o due e la Madre pensa che solo l'Emetico che le hanno subito dato (prescritto dal Dr Robinson) l'abbia salvata da un malanno più serio; - e Miss Bonham è stata per diversi giorni in cura da Mr Carpenter, con una specie di febbre nervosa, e anche se ora sta abbastanza bene da uscire a passeggio, è ancora molto alta e non viene all'Assembly Rooms. Siamo andati tutti a trovarle, sia mercoledì Sera che ieri Sera, immagino di dover dire, altrimenti Martha penserà che Mr Peter Debary sia stato trascurato. - La Mamma ha giocato a Commerce (3) tutte le sere e la prima posta l'ha divisa con Le Chevalier, che è stato abbastanza fortunato da dividere l'altra con qualcun altro. - Sperò che vincerà abbastanza da potersi permettere di trattare se stesso con la stessa indulgenza che le carte sembrano avere per lui. Ha chiesto in modo particolare di te, non sapendo della tua partenza. - Come puoi immaginare ci siamo ormai completamente sistemati nel nostro Alloggio, e tutto procede nel solito modo. La servitù si comporta molto bene e non crea problemi, anche se nulla può certamente superare la scomodità dei Servizi, salvo la generale Sporcizia della Casa, dei mobili e di tutti gli Inquilini. - Finora il tempo è stato proprio come potevamo augurarci che fosse; il perdurare della Stagione asciutta è assolutamente necessario al nostro benessere. - Io tento fin dove posso di prendere il tuo posto, e di rendermi utile, e di tenere le cose in ordine; trovo lo sporco nella brocca dell'acqua il più rapidamente possibile, e do la medicina alla Cuoca, che se la caccia in fretta nello Stomaco. Non mi ricordo se era abituata a fare così, sotto la tua amministrazione. - James è la delizia delle nostre vite; per noi è proprio come la rendita di zio Toby. (4) - Le scarpe della Mamma non sono mai state così lucide, e l'argenteria non ha mai avuto un aspetto così pulito. È bravissimo a servire a tavola, è attento, preciso, veloce e tranquillo, e in breve ha molte più virtù di quelle cardinali (perché le virtù cardinali da sole le hanno possedute così in tanti che non vale più la pena di averle) - e tra le altre, quella di desiderare di andare a Bath, come ho saputo da Jenny. - Credo che abbia quella lodevole sete di Viaggiare, che nel povero James Selby (5) era così tanto biasimata; e parte del suo disappunto per non essere andato con il suo Padrone, nasceva dal desiderio di vedere Londra. In questo momento la Mamma sta leggendo una lettera della Zia. La tua a Miss Irvine, che aveva sottoposto a un'accurata lettura - (il che per inciso, al tuo posto non gradirei) le ha gettate nell'incertezza circa Charles e i suoi progetti. Il problema è, che la Mamma aveva detto in precedenza alla Zia, senza riserve, che c'era uno sloop (che la Zia chiama Fregata) in serbo per Charles in Oriente; laddove tu hai risposto alle domande di Miss Irvine sull'argomento con meno sicurezza e più cautela. - Non preoccuparti - lasciale rimuginare insieme - Visto che Charles andrà comunque nelle Indie Orientali, lo Zio non può essere davvero inquieto, e la Zia può fare quello che vuole con le sue fregate. - Parla molto del caldo torrido - Noi qui non ne sappiamo nulla. - Lo Zio è stato molto sofferente ultimamente; tuttavia intendono andare a Scarlets più o meno in questo periodo, a meno che non ricevano cattive notizie dalla Cuoca. - I Cole hanno messo l'ignobile targa sulla nostra porta. - Immagino che quella costituisca gran parte della targa massiccia di cui si è tanto parlato. - La casa degli Irvine è quasi finita - credo che ci andranno martedì; - la Zia riconosce che ha un aspetto confortevole, e spera solo che "la cucina non sia umida". - Non ho ancora avuto notizie da Charles, e ne sono alquanto sorpresa; - forse qualche ingegnosa aggiunta delle sue all'indirizzo giusto mi impedisce di ricevere la lettera. Ho scritto a Buller; - e ho scritto a Mr Pyne, per la questione della Porta dell'armadio rotta; - Anning era venuto per stimare il costo, che ci ha detto ammontava a cinque scellini, e dato che ci sembrava superiore al valore di tutto il Mobilio della stanza messo insieme, Ci siamo rivolti al proprietario. Il Ballo di ieri sera è stato piacevole, ma non era pieno per essere giovedì. Il babbo è rimasto molto volentieri fino alle nove e mezza - c'eravamo andati un po' dopo le otto - e poi è andato a casa a piedi con James e una Lanterna, anche se credo che la Lanterna non fosse accesa, visto che c'era la Luna. Ma qualche volta questa Lanterna può essergli molto utile. - La Mamma e io siamo rimaste per circa un'ora. Per i primi due balli nessuno mi ha invitata - nei due successivi ho ballato con Mr Crawford - e se avessi deciso di restare più a lungo avrei potuto ballare con Mr Granville, il figlio di Mrs Granville - che la mia cara amica Miss Armstrong si era offerta di presentarmi - o con un Signore mai visto e dall'aspetto strano, che mi aveva fissata per un po', e alla fine senza essersi presentato mi ha chiesto se volevo ballare di nuovo. Credo che sia irlandese sia per la sua disinvoltura, sia perché immagino appartenga alla Nobile famiglia Barnwall, ovvero il figlio e la moglie del figlio di un Visconte irlandese - gente insolente e dall'aspetto bizzarro, adatti a essere considerati di Alto Rango a Lyme. - Mrs Feaver e gli Schuyler se ne sono andati, non so dove, martedì scorso, per qualche giorno; e quando torneranno, ho capito che gli Schuyler rimarranno qui ancora per molto poco. - Ieri mattina - (o dovrei dire attenendomi strettamente alle regole la Scorsa Mattina?) ho fatto visita a Miss Armstrong, e sono stata presentata al padre e alla Madre. Come altre Signorine lei è notevolmente più distinta dei Genitori; Mrs Armstrong è rimasta seduta a rammendare un paio di Calze per l'intera durata della mia visita -. Ma di questo non parlerò a casa, per paura che un ammonimento diventi un esempio. - Subito dopo abbiamo passeggiato insieme per un'ora sul Cobb; (6) in generale ha una conversazione molto piacevole; non noto particolare Arguzia o Genio - ma ha Buonsenso e un certo Gusto, e maniere molto accattivanti. Ho l'impressione che la gente le piaccia un po' troppo facilmente - riteneva i Downe simpatici ecc. ecc. Non ho saputo nulla di Mr e Mrs Mawhood. La Zia dice che Mrs Holder è tornata da Cheltenham; così, la sua l'estate finisce prima che cominci la loro. - Hanno avuto buone notizie di Hooper da Madeira. - Eliza lo invidierebbe. - Non c'è bisogno di dire che aspettiamo con particolare impazienza la tua prossima Lettera, per sapere come avrai trovato Mrs Lloyd e Martha. - Per la seconda tutto il nostro affetto - La prima temo debba essere al di là di qualsiasi ricordo degli Assenti. (7) Con affetto, tua

JA.

Spero che Martha trovi che hai un aspetto migliore di quando ti ha vista a Bath. - Oggi Jenny mi ha sistemato i capelli nello stesso modo in cui era abituata a fare con Miss Lloyd, cosa che ci ha rese molto soddisfatte. -

Venerdì Sera. -

Stamattina fare il bagno era così delizioso e Molly così insistente affinché mi divertissi che credo di esserci stata un po' troppo, dato che da mezzogiorno in poi mi sono sentita inspiegabilmente stanca. La prossima volta sarò più prudente, e domani non farò il bagno che avevo intenzione di fare. - Nel pomeriggio Jenny e James hanno fatto una passeggiata a Charmouth; - Sono contenta di avergli procurato uno svago - perché ci tengo molto che sia sereno e insieme contento. - Sa leggere, e devo procurargli qualche libro. Sfortunatamente ha già letto il primo vol. di Robinson Crusoe. (8) Comunque abbiamo il Giornale dei Pinckard, che mi premunirò di prestargli - (9)



(1) La carta usata per questa lettera è molto sottile e, perciò, le righe tracciate prima di scrivere sono molto più visibili.

(2) Giorgio III era in quei giorni a Weymouth, resa alla moda dal duca di Gloucester, ovvero il fratello del re, William-Henry (vedi il riferimento nella frase successiva agli "abitanti di Gloucester"). Nel "Morning Post" comparve la notizia citata da JA: "Weymouth, 11 settembre. Alle dieci e mezza i componenti della Famiglia Reale hanno lasciato il loro Alloggio, e si sono recati in carrozza sulla spiaggia, dove due barche erano in attesa di riceverli, e di condurli a bordo dello Yacht Reale."

(3) Un gioco simile al Monopoli.

(4) Laurence Sterne, Tristram Shandy, vol. III, cap. 22: "- Have I not one hundred and twenty pounds a year, besides my half pay? cried my uncle Toby" ("«Non ho una rendita di centoventi sterline all'anno oltre alla pensione?» gridò lo zio Tobia." - trad. di Antonio Meo).

(5) Un personaggio di Sir Charles Grandison, romanzo epistolare di Samuel Richardson, del quale si dice (vol. VI): "d'improvviso gli venne la smania di andare all'estero, come se, stupida gioventù, viaggiare lo potesse rendere un Sir Charles Grandison".

(6) Il molo di Lyme Regis, costruito a semicerchio sulla baia, dove JA ambienterà una parte di Persuasion.

(7) Mrs Lloyd era stata colpita da un ictus che le aveva provocato danni fisici e cerebrali. Morirà nell'aprile dell'anno successivo.

(8) Il famoso romanzo di Daniel Defoe, pubblicato nel 1719.

(9) L'affrancatura standard di una lettera (il cui costo non era esiguo) era riferita a due fogli, ovvero quattro facciate, che venivano riempiti il più possibile. In questa lettera c'è un esempio di questa pratica, che doveva essere non poco scomoda per il destinatario-lettore: nell'immagine sotto (che si può ingrandire cliccandoci sopra) si può vedere la prima facciata, dove c'è l'inizio della lettera scritto nel verso normale (in alto, al centro, luogo e data, e poi "My dear Cassandra..."), le righe subito prima della firma, rovesciate in alto a destra (da "I need not say that we are..." fino alla firma) e, infine, la parte finale ("Friday Eveng. - ..."), scritta in senso perpendicolare alla direzione iniziale.

40
(Monday 21 January 1805)
Francis Austen, Portsmouth


Green Park Bgs Monday Janry 21st

My dearest Frank

I have melancholy news to relate, & sincerely feel for your feelings under the shock of it. - I wish I could better prepare You for it. - But having said so much, Your mind will already forestall the sort of Event which I have to communicate. - Our dear Father has closed his virtuous & happy life, in a death almost as free from suffering as his Children could have wished. He was taken ill on Saturday morning, exactly in the same way as heretofore, an oppression in the head with fever, violent tremulousness, & the greatest degree of Feebleness. The same remedy of Cupping, which had before been so successful, was immediately applied to - but without such happy effects. The attack was more violent, & at first he seemed scarcely at all releived by the Operation. - Towards the Evening however he got better, had a tolerable night, & yesterday morning was so greatly amended as to get up & join us at breakfast as usual, walk about with only the help of a stick, & every symptom was then so favourable that when Bowen saw him at one, he felt sure of his doing perfectly well. - But as the day advanced, all these comfortable appearances gradually changed; the fever grew stronger than ever, & when Bowen saw him at ten at night, he pronounc'd his situation to be most alarming. - At nine this morning he came again - & by his desire a Physician was called in; - Dr Gibbs - But it was then absolutely a lost case -. Dr Gibbs said that nothing but a Miracle could save him, and about twenty minutes after Ten he drew his last gasp. - Heavy as is the blow, we can already feel that a thousand comforts remain to us to soften it. Next to that of the consciousness of his worth & constant preparation for another World, is the remembrance of his having suffered, comparatively speaking, nothing. - Being quite insensible of his own state, he was spared all the pain of separation, & he went off almost in his Sleep. - My Mother bears the Shock as well as possible; she was quite prepared for it, & feels all the blessing of his being spared a long Illness. My Uncle & Aunt have been with us, & shew us every imaginable kindness. And tomorrow we shall I dare say have the comfort of James's presence, as an Express has been sent to him. - We write also of course to Godmersham & Brompton. Adeiu my dearest Frank. The loss of such a Parent must be felt, or we should be Brutes -. I wish I could have given you better preparation - but it has been impossible. - Yours Ever affecly

JA.

Capt. Austen
HMS Leopard
Dungeness
New Romney

40
(lunedì 21 gennaio 1805)
Francis Austen, Portsmouth


Green Park Buildings lunedì 21 gennaio

Mio carissimo Frank

Ho una triste notizia da riferire, e sono sinceramente vicina al tuo animo per il colpo che ti procurerà. - Avrei voluto poterti preparare meglio. - Ma avendo detto così tanto, avrai già previsto quale Evento devo comunicarti. - Il nostro caro Padre ha concluso la sua vita virtuosa e felice, con una morte quasi priva di sofferenze quale i suoi Figli avrebbero desiderato. Si era sentito male sabato mattina, esattamente come gli era già capitato in altre occasioni, un senso di oppressione alla testa con febbre, tremiti violenti, ed estrema Debolezza. Gli sono state immediatamente applicate le Coppette, che in precedenza erano state così efficaci - ma senza quegli effetti positivi. L'attacco era più violento, e in un primo momento sembrava che non avesse avuto nessun sollievo dall'Operazione. - Verso Sera tuttavia è migliorato, ha passato una nottata discreta, e ieri mattina si era talmente rimesso da potersi alzare, e unirsi a noi per la colazione come al solito, passeggiare nei dintorni con il solo aiuto del bastone, e tutti i sintomi erano così favorevoli che quando Bowen l'ha visitato all'una, si è mostrato certo che si sarebbe completamente ristabilito. - Ma con il passare della giornata, tutti questi aspetti rassicuranti sono man mano mutati; la febbre era più alta che mai, e quando Bowen l'ha visitato alle dieci di sera, ha dichiarato che la situazione era molto allarmante. - Alle nove di stamattina è venuto di nuovo - e su sua richiesta abbiamo chiamato un Medico; - il Dr Gibbes - Ma ormai era un caso assolutamente disperato -. Il Dr Gibbs ha detto che nulla se non un Miracolo avrebbe potuto salvarlo, e alle Dieci e venti circa ha esalato l'ultimo respiro. - Per quanto forte sia il colpo, possiamo già renderci conto che ci rimangono mille consolazioni per attutirlo. Oltre alla consapevolezza del suo valore e della sua costante preparazione per un altro Mondo, c'è il ricordo di non averlo visto soffrire, relativamente parlando, per nulla. - Essendo del tutto inconsapevole del suo stato, gli è stato risparmiato il dolore della separazione, e se n'è andato quasi nel Sonno. - La Mamma sopporta il Colpo nei limiti del possibile; si era già preparata all'evento, e si rende conto della benedizione che gli sia stata risparmiata una lunga Malattia. Lo Zio e la Zia sono stati con noi, e hanno dato prova di ogni immaginabile gentilezza. E domani immagino che avremo il conforto della presenza di James, dato che gli è stato inviato un Espresso. - Naturalmente scriviamo anche a Godmersham e a Brompton. (1) Adieu mio carissimo Frank. Dobbiamo sentire il peso della perdita di un tale Genitore, altrimenti saremmo dei Bruti -. Avrei voluto poterti preparare meglio - ma è stato impossibile. - Con affetto, Sempre tua

JA.



(1) Godmersham Park era la residenza della famiglia di Edward Austen; Brompton era un sobborgo di Londra dove in quel periodo abitavano, al n. 16 di Michael's Place, Henry ed Eliza Austen.

  21-30      |     indice lettere     |     home page     |      41-50