Jane Austen

Lettere 11-20
traduzione di Giuseppe Ierolli

  1-10      |     indice lettere     |     home page     |      21-30 

11
(Saturday 17 - Sunday 18 Novembre 1798) - no ms.
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Saturday, November 17

My dear Cassandra

If you paid any attention to the conclusion of my last letter, you will be satisfied, before you receive this, that my mother has had no relapse, and that Miss Debary comes. The former continues to recover, and though she does not gain strength very rapidly, my expectations are humble enough not to outstride her improvements. She was able to sit up nearly eight hours yesterday, and to-day I hope we shall do as much. ... So much for my patient - now for myself. Mrs Lefroy did come last Wednesday, and the Harwoods came likewise, but very considerately paid their visit before Mrs Lefroy's arrival, with whom, in spite of interruptions both from my father and James, I was enough alone to hear all that was interesting, which you will easily credit when I tell you that of her nephew she said nothing at all, and of her friend very little. She did not once mention the name of the former to me, and I was too proud to make any enquiries; but on my father's afterwards asking where he was, I learnt that he was gone back to London in his way to Ireland, where he is called to the Bar and means to practise. She showed me a letter which she had received from her friend a few weeks ago (in answer to one written by her to recommend a nephew of Mrs Russell to his notice at Cambridge), towards the end of which was a sentence to this effect: "I am very sorry to hear of Mrs Austen's illness. It would give me particular pleasure to have an opportunity of improving my acquaintance with that family - with a hope of creating to myself a nearer interest. But at present I cannot indulge any expectation of it." This is rational enough; there is less love and more sense in it than sometimes appeared before, and I am very well satisfied. It will all go on exceedingly well, and decline away in a very reasonable manner. There seems no likelihood of his coming into Hampshire this Christmas, and it is therefore most probable that our indifference will soon be mutual, unless his regard, which appeared to spring from knowing nothing of me at first, is best supported by never seeing me. Mrs Lefroy made no remarks on the letter, nor did she indeed say anything about him as relative to me. Perhaps she thinks she has said too much already. She saw a great deal of the Mapletons while she was in Bath. Christian is still in a very bad state of health, consumptive, and not likely to recover. Mrs Portman is not much admired in Dorsetshire; the good-natured world, as usual, extolled her beauty so highly, that all the neighbourhood have had the pleasure of being disappointed. My mother desires me to tell you that I am a very good housekeeper, which I have no reluctance in doing, because I really think it my peculiar excellence, and for this reason - I always take care to provide such things as please my own appetite, which I consider as the chief merit in housekeeping. I have had some ragout veal, and I mean to have some haricot mutton tomorrow. We are to kill a pig soon. There is to be a ball at Basingstoke next Thursday. Our assemblies have very kindly declined ever since we laid down the carriage, so that dis-convenience and dis-inclination to go have kept pace together. My father's affection for Miss Cuthbert is as lively as ever, and he begs that you will not neglect to send him intelligence of her or her brother, whenever you have any to send. I am likewise to tell you that one of his Leicestershire sheep, sold to the butcher last week, weighed 27 lb. and ¼ per quarter. I went to Deane with my father two days ago to see Mary, who is still plagued with the rheumatism, which she would be very glad to get rid of, and still more glad to get rid of her child, of whom she is heartily tired. Her nurse is come, and has no particular charm either of person or manner; but as all the Hurstbourne world pronounce her to be the best nurse that ever was, Mary expects her attachment to increase. What fine weather this is! Not very becoming perhaps early in the morning, but very pleasant out of doors at noon, and very wholesome - at least everybody fancies so, and imagination is everything. To Edward, however, I really think dry weather of importance. I have not taken to fires yet. I believe I never told you that Mrs Coulthard and Anne, late of Manydown, are both dead, and both died in childbed. We have not regaled Mary with this news. Harry St. John is in Orders, has done duty at Ashe, and performs very well. I am very fond of experimental housekeeping, such as having an ox-cheek now and then; I shall have one next week, and I mean to have some little dumplings put into it, that I may fancy myself at Godmersham. I hope George was pleased with my designs. Perhaps they would have suited him as well had they been less elaborately finished; but an artist cannot do anything slovenly. I suppose baby grows and improves. Sunday. - I have just received a note from James to say that Mary was brought to bed last night, at eleven o'clock, of a fine little boy, and that everything is going on very well. My mother had desired to know nothing of it before it should be all over, and we were clever enough to prevent her having any suspicion of it, though Jenny, who had been left here by her mistress, was sent for home.... I called yesterday on Betty Londe, who enquired particularly after you, and said she seemed to miss you very much, because you used to call in upon her very often. This was an oblique reproach at me, which I am sorry to have merited, and from which I will profit. I shall send George another picture when I write next, which I suppose will be soon, on Mary's account. My mother continues well.

Yours,
J.A.

Miss Austen,
Godmersham.

11
(sabato 17 - domenica 18 novembre 1798) - no ms.
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


sabato 17 novembre

Mia cara Cassandra

Se hai prestato attenzione alla conclusione della mia ultima lettera, ti sarai convinta, prima di ricevere questa, che la mamma non ha avuto ricadute, e che Miss Debary (1) verrà. La prima continua a riprendersi, e anche se non si rimette molto rapidamente, le mie aspettative sono abbastanza modeste da non superare i suoi progressi. Ieri è stata in grado di stare alzata per quasi otto ore, e oggi spero che farà altrettanto. [...] Questo è quanto per la mia paziente - ora passiamo a me. Mrs Lefroy è venuta lo scorso mercoledì, e così pure gli Harwood, ma molto opportunamente la loro visita si è conclusa prima dell'arrivo di Mrs Lefroy, con la quale, nonostante le interruzioni sia del babbo che di James, sono stata abbastanza da sola per sapere tutto ciò che poteva essere interessante, perciò ti sarà facile credermi quando ti dirò che non ha parlato affatto di suo nipote, e pochissimo del suo amico. (2) A me non ha menzionato nemmeno una volta il nome del primo, e io ero troppo orgogliosa per fare domande; ma dopo una domanda del babbo su dove fosse, ho appreso che era tornato a Londra diretto in Irlanda, dove è stato ammesso all'Avvocatura e intende esercitare. Mi ha mostrato una lettera che aveva ricevuto dal suo amico qualche settimana fa (in risposta a una scritta da lei per raccomandare alla sua attenzione un nipote di Mrs Russell a Cambridge), verso la fine della quale c'era una frase di questo tenore: "Mi dispiace molto di sapere della malattia di Mrs Austen. Sarei particolarmente lieto di avere l'opportunità di approfondire la conoscenza di quella famiglia - con la speranza di suscitare in me un interesse più personale. Ma al momento non posso concedermi di farlo." Ciò è sufficientemente razionale; c'è meno amore e più buonsenso in questo di quanto possa talvolta essere sembrato in precedenza, e io sono soddisfattissima. Tutto procederà nel migliore dei modi, e si estinguerà in maniera molto ragionevole. Pare che non ci sia nessuna possibilità di una sua venuta nello Hampshire per il Natale, ed è quindi molto probabile che la nostra indifferenza diverrà presto reciproca, a meno che il suo interesse, che all'inizio sembrava scaturire dal non sapere nulla di me, si rafforzi meglio non vedendomi più. Mrs Lefroy non ha fatto commenti sulla lettera, né in effetti ha detto nulla su di lui in relazione a me. Forse pensa di aver già detto troppo. Ha visto molto spesso i Mapleton mentre era a Bath. Christian è ancora in un pessimo stato di salute, tubercolosi, ed è improbabile che si riprenda. Mrs Portman non è molto ammirata nel Dorsetshire; i benpensanti, come al solito, hanno decantato la sua bellezza in modo così eccessivo, che tutto il vicinato ha avuto il piacere di restare deluso. La mamma vuole che ti dica che sono un'ottima governante, cosa che non sono riluttante a fare, perché penso davvero che sia una mia peculiare eccellenza, e per questo motivo: ho sempre molto cura di provvedere a quelle cose che soddisfano il mio appetito, cosa che considero il principale merito nel governo di una casa. Ho fatto preparare del ragù di vitella, e domani ho intenzione di far preparare dello stufato di montone. Ammazzeremo presto un maiale. Giovedì prossimo ci sarà un ballo a Basingstoke. Le nostre riunioni sono gentilmente diminuite da quando abbiamo dismesso la carrozza, cosicché la mancanza di possibilità e la mancanza di propensione sono andate di pari passo. L'affetto del babbo per Miss Cuthbert è vivo come sempre, e ti prega di non mancare di mandargli notizie sue o del fratello, ogniqualvolta tu ne abbia qualcuna da mandare. Devo inoltre informarti che una delle sue pecore Leicestershire, venduta la settimana scorsa al macellaio, pesava 27 libbre e ¼ per quarto. Due giorni fa sono andata a Dean con il babbo a trovare Mary, che è ancora tormentata dai reumatismi, dei quali sarebbe molto lieta di liberarsi, e ancor più lieta di liberarsi del bambino, di cui è davvero stufa. È arrivata la bambinaia, e non ha un fascino particolare né nella persona né nei modi; ma siccome tutti a Hurstbourne la decantano come la miglior bambinaia mai esistita, Mary si aspetta di veder aumentare la sua simpatia. Che bel tempo che abbiamo! Forse non molto appropriato il mattino presto, ma molto piacevole all'aperto nel pomeriggio, e molto salubre - almeno tutti immaginano che sia così, e l'immaginazione è tutto. Per Edward, tuttavia, credo davvero che sia importante il clima secco. Non ho ancora acceso il fuoco. Credo di non averti mai detto che Mrs Coulthard e Anne, un tempo di Manydown, sono morte entrambe, ed entrambe di parto. Non abbiamo intrattenuto Mary con queste notizie. Harry St. John ha ricevuto gli Ordini, ha preso servizio ad Ashe, e si comporta benissimo. Sono molto appassionata di economia domestica sperimentale, come far preparare ogni tanto una guancia di bue; ne farò preparare una la settimana prossima, e intendo metterci qualche polpettina, il che mi farà immaginare di essere a Godmersham. Spero che a George siano piaciuti i miei disegni. Forse sarebbero andati bene anche se rifiniti in modo meno elaborato; ma un artista non può fare nulla in modo trasandato. Suppongo che il bimbo cresca e faccia progressi. Domenica. - Ho appena ricevuto un biglietto di James, che dice che Mary ha partorito ieri sera, alle undici, un bel bambino, e che tutto procede benissimo. La mamma aveva chiesto di non farle sapere nulla prima che fosse tutto finito, e noi eravamo state molto attente a non farle sorgere nessun sospetto, anche se Jenny, che era stata lasciata qui dalla padrona, era stata rispedita a casa [...] Ieri sono andata a trovare Betty Londe, che ha chiesto in modo particolare di te, e ha detto che sentiva moltissimo la tua mancanza, perché avevi l'abitudine di andarla a trovare molto spesso. Era un rimprovero obliquo a me, che mi dispiace di aver meritato, e dal quale trarrò profitto. Manderò a George un altro disegno quando scriverò di nuovo, il che suppongo avverrà presto, per via di Mary. La mamma continua a star bene.

La tua,
J.A.



(1) Una conoscente di Ibthorpe della famiglia Lloyd, che veniva a Dean per assistere Mary Lloyd, moglie di James Austen, che partorirà il giorno successivo (vedi la parte finale della lettera).

(2) Il nipote era Tom Lefroy (vedi la lettera 1) e il suo amico il rev. Samuel Blackall, del quale JA citerà quindici anni dopo il matrimonio, nella lettera 86 al fratello Francis. Sembra che Mrs Lefroy, dopo il flirt di JA con il nipote, avesse invitato il rev. Blackall anche per tentare di consolare con un nuovo pretendente la delusione della sua giovane amica, cosa che le frasi successive di JA, in un certo senso, confermano. Evidentemente, però, la cosa non aveva avuto seguito.

12
(Sunday 25 November 1798) - no ms.
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Steventon: Sunday November 25

My dear Sister

I expected to have heard from you this morning, but no letter is come. I shall not take the trouble of announcing to you any more of Mary's children, if, instead of thanking me for the intelligence, you always sit down and write to James. I am sure nobody can desire your letters so much as I do, and I don't think anybody deserves them so well. Having now relieved my heart of a great deal of malevolence, I will proceed to tell you that Mary continues quite well, and my mother tolerably so. I saw the former on Friday, and though I had seen her comparatively hearty the Tuesday before, I was really amazed at the improvement which three days had made in her. She looked well, her spirits were perfectly good, and she spoke much more vigorously than Elizabeth did when we left Godmersham. I had only a glimpse at the child, who was asleep; but Miss Debary told me that his eyes were large, dark, and handsome. She looks much as she used to do, is netting herself a gown in worsteds, and wears what Mrs Birch would call a pot hat. A short and compendious history of Miss Debary! I suppose you have heard from Henry himself that his affairs are happily settled. We do not know who furnishes the qualification. Mr Mowell would have readily given it, had not all his Oxfordshire property been engaged for a similar purpose to the Colonel. Amusing enough! Our family affairs are rather deranged at present, for Nanny has kept her bed these three or four days, with a pain in her side and fever, and we are forced to have two charwomen, which is not very comfortable. She is considerably better now, but it must still be some time, I suppose, before she is able to do anything. You and Edward will be amused, I think, when you know that Nanny Littlewart dresses my hair. The ball on Thursday was a very small one indeed, hardly so large as an Oxford smack. There were but seven couples, and only twenty-seven people in the room. The Overton Scotchman has been kind enough to rid me of some of my money, in exchange for six shifts and four pair of stockings. The Irish is not so fine as I should like it; but as I gave as much money for it as I intended, I have no reason to complain. It cost me 3s. 6d. per yard. It is rather finer, however, than our last, and not so harsh a cloth. We have got "Fitz-Albini; " my father has bought it against my private wishes, for it does not quite satisfy my feelings that we should purchase the only one of Egerton's works of which his family are ashamed. That these scruples, however, do not at all interfere with my reading it, you will easily believe. We have neither of us yet finished the first volume. My father is disappointed - I am not, for I expected nothing better. Never did any book carry more internal evidence of its author. Every sentiment is completely Egerton's. There is very little story, and what there is told in a strange, unconnected way. There are many characters introduced, apparently merely to be delineated. We have not been able to recognise any of them hitherto, except Dr and Mrs Hey and Mr Oxenden, who is not very tenderly treated. You must tell Edward that my father gives 25s. a piece to Seward for his last lot of sheep, and, in return for this news, my father wishes to receive some of Edward's pigs. We have got Boswell's "Tour to the Hebrides", and are to have his " Life of Johnson"; and, as some money will yet remain in Burdon's hands, it is to be laid out in the purchase of Cowper's works. This would please Mr Clarke, could he know it. By the bye, I have written to Mrs. Birch among my other writings, and so I hope to have some account of all the people in that part of the world before long. I have written to Mrs E. Leigh too, and Mrs Heathcote has been ill-natured enough to send me a letter of enquiry; so that altogether I am tolerably tired of letter-writing, and, unless I have anything new to tell you of my mother or Mary, I shall not write again for many days; perhaps a little repose may restore my regard for a pen. Ask little Edward whether Bob Brown wears a great coat this cold weather.

Miss Austen,
Godmersham Park.

12
(domenica 25 novembre 1798) - no ms.
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Steventon: domenica 25 novembre

Mia cara Sorella

Mi aspettavo di ricevere tue notizie stamattina, ma non è arrivata nessuna lettera. Non mi prenderò più il disturbo di scriverti nient'altro dei bambini di Mary, se, invece di ringraziarmi per le informazioni, tu non fai altro che sederti e scrivere a James. Sono certa che nessuno può desiderare le tue lettere quanto me, e non credo che qualcuno le meriti altrettanto. Ora che mi sono tolta questo peso dal cuore, proseguirò dicendoti che Mary procede molto bene, e che la mamma fa quasi altrettanto. La prima l'ho vista venerdì, e sebbene l'avessi trovata relativamente in forze il martedì precedente, sono rimasta davvero stupita dai progressi che ha fatto in soli tre giorni. Aveva un bell'aspetto, era di ottimo umore, e parlava con molto più vigore di quanto facesse Elizabeth quando siamo partiti da Godmersham. Ho dato solo un'occhiata al bambino, che stava dormendo, ma Miss Debary mi ha detto che ha begli occhi grandi e scuri. Lei ha il solito aspetto, sta lavorando a un vestito di lana, e porta quella che Mrs Birch chiamerebbe una bombetta. Breve e concisa storia di Miss Debary! Immagino che tu abbia saputo direttamente da Henry che i suoi affari hanno avuto una felice conclusione. Non sappiamo chi abbia fornito la garanzia. (1) Mr Mowell l'avrebbe fatto volentieri, se non avesse già impegnato tutta la sua proprietà nell'Oxfordshire per uno scopo simile a favore del Colonnello. Divertente! Nelle nostre faccende domestiche al momento c'è un po' di scompiglio, perché Nanny ha passato a letto gli ultimi tre o quattro giorni, con la febbre e un dolore al fianco, e siamo costrette a tenere due domestiche a ore, il che non è molto comodo. Ora sta notevolmente meglio, ma deve passare ancora un po' di tempo, immagino, prima che sia in grado di fare qualcosa. Tu ed Edward vi divertirete, penso, quando saprete che è Nanny Littlewart a pettinarmi. Al ballo di giovedì c'era veramente poca gente, a malapena quanta in un Oxford smack. (2) Non c'erano che sette coppie, e solo ventisette persone in sala. L'ambulante di Overton è stato così gentile da sbarazzarmi di un po' del mio denaro, in cambio di sei camicette e quattro paia di calze. Il lino irlandese non è buono come avrei voluto; ma visto che l'ho pagato com'era nelle mie intenzioni, non ho motivi per lamentarmi. Mi è costato 3s. e 6d. alla iarda. Comunque, è alquanto più fine dell'ultimo, e non di tessuto così ruvido. Abbiamo preso "Fitz-Albini"; (3) il babbo l'ha comprato contro i miei desideri segreti, perché non soddisfa affatto la mia sensibilità aver acquistato l'unica delle opere di Egerton della quale la famiglia si vergogni. (4) Che questi scrupoli, tuttavia, non interferiscano affatto con la mia lettura, puoi crederci senza alcun dubbio. Nessuno di noi ha ancora terminato il primo volume. Il babbo è deluso - io no, perché non mi aspettavo nulla di meglio. Mai libro ha contenuto più testimonianze intime del suo autore. Ogni sentimento è completamente Egertoniano. La trama è molto povera, e quella che c'è è raccontata in modo strano e sconnesso. Ci sono molti personaggi, apparentemente introdotti solo per essere descritti. Finora non siamo stati capaci di riconoscerne nessuno, eccetto il Dr Hey e la moglie e Mr Oxenden, che non ha un trattamento molto tenero. Devi dire a Edward che il babbo ha dato 25 s. al pezzo a Seward per l'ultima partita di pecore, e, in cambio di questa notizia, il babbo desidera sapere qualcosa sui maiali di Edward. Abbiamo preso il "Tour to the Hebrides" di Boswell, e sta per arrivare la sua "Life of Johnson"; e, dato che rimarranno ancora dei soldi in mano a Burdon, (5) li useremo per l'acquisto delle opere di Cowper. Questo farebbe piacere a Mr Clarke, se lo sapesse. A proposito, tra le altre lettere ne ho mandata una a Mrs. Birch, e così spero di sapere tra non molto qualcosa di tutti quelli che stanno in quella parte del mondo. Ho scritto anche a Mrs E. Leigh, e Mrs Heathcote è stata tanto maligna da mandarmi una lettera per chiedere delle informazioni; cosicché sono nel complesso abbastanza stanca di scrivere lettere, e, a meno che non abbia qualcosa di nuovo da dirti sulla mamma o su Mary, non scriverò più per molti giorni; forse un po' di riposo potrà ristabilire la mia stima per la penna. Chiedi al piccolo Edward se Bob Brown indossa un cappotto pesante con questo freddo.



(1) Henry Austen era stato promosso capitano, aiutante del comandante e tesoriere del reggimento. Per quest'ultimo compito era richiesta una garanzia finanziaria di almeno duemila sterline, a copertura di eventuali appropriazioni indebite, che doveva essere fornita dall'interessato e da altri due garanti.

(2) Nell'OED "Oxford smack" è in una delle definizioni di "smack" come nome (schiocco, schiaffo, bacio rumoroso), ma è riportata solo la citazione austeniana, senza spiegazioni. Le Faye, nella sua edizione delle lettere, annota: "Non chiarito". "Smack" è anche una piccola barca usata generalmente per la pesca o la navigazione sottocosta, e infatti Linda Gaia traduce con: "Al ballo di giovedì c'erano pochissime persone, a malapena quante ne sarebbero entrate in una barchetta di Oxford.", e in un articolo su "Notes and Queries" ("Jane Austen's Smack", 58(1), 2011, pagg. 77-79) Deirdre Le Faye ipotizza che possa trattarsi di un errore di trascrizione dal manoscritto (ora perduto), e che al posto di "Oxford" si debba leggere "Orford", un piccolo villaggio di pescatori del Suffolk; Le Faye aggiunge che probabilmente la locuzione "Orford smack" era usata scherzosamente in famiglia per indicare qualcosa di piccolo, a seguito dei racconti di Henry Austen riferiti al periodo in cui era nella milizia dell'Oxfordshire, che dal 1795 al 1799 agì nei territori costieri del sud-est dell'Inghilterra.

(3) Arthur Fitz-Albini: a Novel, romanzo di Samuel Egerton Brydges, pubblicato nel 1798.

(4) L'autore era fratello di Mrs. Lefroy, e il romanzo, come si capisce anche dalla successiva descrizione di JA, è una sorta di autobiografia con molti riferimenti alla famiglia.

(5) Uno dei due Burdon di Winchester dai quali gli Austen compravano libri: John Burdon, a College Street o Thomas Burdon, libraio e mercante di vini a Kingsgate Street.

13
(Saturday 1 - Sunday 2 December 1798) - no ms.
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Steventon: December 1

My dear Cassandra

I am so good as to write to you again thus speedily, to let you know that I have just heard from Frank. He was at Cadiz, alive and well, on October 19, and had then very lately received a letter from you, written as long ago as when the "London" was at St. Helen's. But his raly latest intelligence of us was in one from me of September 1, which I sent soon after we got to Godmersham. He had written a packet full for his dearest friends in England, early in October, to go by the "Excellent"; but the "Excellent" was not sailed, nor likely to sail, when he despatched this to me. It comprehended letters for both of us, for Lord Spencer, Mr Daysh, and the East India Directors. Lord St Vincent had left the fleet when he wrote, and was gone to Gibraltar, it was said to superintend the fitting out of a private expedition from thence against some of the enemies' ports; Minorca or Malta were conjectured to be the objects. Frank writes in good spirits, but says that our correspondence cannot be so easily carried on in future as it has been, as the communication between Cadiz and Lisbon is less frequent than formerly. You and my mother, therefore, must not alarm yourselves at the long intervals that may divide his letters. I address this advice to you two as being the most tender-hearted of the family. My mother made her entrée into the dressing-room through crowds of admiring spectators yesterday afternoon, and we all drank tea together for the first time these five weeks. She has had a tolerable night, and bids fair for a continuance in the same brilliant course of action to-day. ... Mr Lyford was here yesterday; he came while we were at dinner, and partook of our elegant entertainment. I was not ashamed at asking him to sit down to table, for we had some pease-soup, a sparerib, and a pudding. He wants my mother to look yellow and to throw out a rash, but she will do neither. I was at Deane yesterday morning. Mary was very well, but does not gain bodily strength very fast. When I saw her so stout on the third and sixth days, I expected to have seen her as well as ever by the end of a fortnight. James went to Ibthorp yesterday to see his mother and child. Letty is with Mary at present, of course exceedingly happy, and in raptures with the child. Mary does not manage matters in such a way as to make me want to lay in myself. She is not tidy enough in her appearance; she has no dressing-gown to sit up in; her curtains are all too thin, and things are not in that comfort and style about her which are necessary to make such a situation an enviable one. Elizabeth was really a pretty object with her nice clean cap put on so tidily and her dress so uniformly white and orderly. We live entirely in the dressing-room now, which I like very much; I always feel so much more elegant in it than in the parlour. No news from Kintbury yet. Eliza sports with our impatience. She was very well last Thursday. Who is Miss Maria Montresor going to marry, and what is to become of Miss Mulcaster? I find great comfort in my stuff gown, but I hope you do not, wear yours too often. I have made myself two or three caps to wear of evenings since I came home, and they save me a world of torment as to hair-dressing, which at present gives me no trouble beyond washing and brushing, for my long hair is always plaited up out of sight, and my short hair curls well enough to want no papering. I have had it cut lately by Mr Butler. There is no reason to suppose that Miss Morgan is dead after all. Mr Lyford gratified us very much yesterday by his praises of my father's mutton, which they all think the finest that was ever ate. John Bond begins to find himself grow old, which John Bonds ought not to do, and unequal to much hard work; a man is therefore hired to supply his place as to labour, and John himself is to have the care of the sheep. There are not more people engaged than before, I believe; only men instead of boys. I fancy so at least, but you know my stupidity as to such matters. Lizzie Bond is just apprenticed to Miss Small, so we may hope to see her able to spoil gowns in a few years. My father has applied to Mr May for an alehouse for Robert, at his request, and to Mr Deane, of Winchester, likewise. This was my mother's idea, who thought he would be proud to oblige a relation of Edward in return for Edward's accepting his money. He sent a very civil answer indeed, but has no house vacant at present. May expects to have an empty one soon at Farnham, so perhaps Nanny may have the honour of drawing ale for the Bishop. I shall write to Frank to-morrow. Charles Powlett gave a dance on Thursday, to the great disturbance of all his neighbours, of course, who, you know, take a most lively interest in the state of his finances, and live in hopes of his being soon ruined. We are very much disposed to like our new maid; she knows nothing of a dairy, to be sure, which, in our family, is rather against her, but she is to be taught it all. In short, we have felt the inconvenience of being without a maid so long, that we are determined to like her, and she will find it a hard matter to displease us. As yet, she seems to cook very well, is uncommonly stout, and says she can work well at her needle. Sunday. - My father is glad to hear so good an account of Edward's pigs, and desires he may be told, as encouragement to his taste for them, that Lord Bolton is particularly curious in his pigs, has had pigstyes of a most elegant construction built for them, and visits them every morning as soon as he rises.

Affectionately yours,
J.A.

Miss Austen,
Godmersham Park,
Faversham.

13
(sabato 1 - domenica 2 dicembre 1798) - no ms.
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Steventon: 1° dicembre

Mia cara Cassandra

Sono così buona da scriverti di nuovo con sollecitudine, per farti sapere che ho appena avuto notizie da Frank. Era a Cadice, vivo e vegeto, il 19 ottobre, e allora aveva ricevuto da poco una tua lettera, scritta molto tempo prima quando la "London" era a St Helen's Bay. Ma in realtà le ultime informazioni su di noi erano in una mia del 1° settembre, che ho spedito subito dopo il nostro arrivo a Godmersham. Ai primi di ottobre, aveva preparato un plico pieno di lettere per i suoi amici più cari in Inghilterra, da mandare con l'"Excellent"; ma l'"Excellent" non era partita, né sembrava probabile lo facesse, quando mi ha spedito quella di cui parlavo. Il plico comprendeva lettere per noi due, per Lord St Vincent, per Mr Daysh e per la Direzione della Compagnia delle Indie orientali. Quando ha scritto Lord St Vincent aveva lasciato la flotta, per andare a Gibilterra, sembra per sovrintendere alla preparazione di una spedizione segreta contro i porti nemici; si ipotizzava che gli obiettivi fossero Minorca o Malta. Da come scrive Frank sembra di buon umore, ma dice che in futuro la nostra corrispondenza non potrà proseguire facilmente come adesso, dato che i collegamenti tra Cadice e Lisbona sono meno frequenti di prima. Tu e la mamma, (1) quindi, non dovete allarmarvi per i lunghi intervalli tra le sue lettere. Rivolgo a voi questo consiglio in quanto voi due siete le persone più emotive della famiglia. Ieri pomeriggio la mamma ha fatto la sua entrée nel soggiorno tra folle di spettatori adoranti, e abbiamo bevuto il tè tutti insieme per la prima volta dopo cinque settimane. Ha passato una notte discreta, e ha promesso di proseguire oggi nella stessa brillante linea di condotta. [...] Ieri è venuto Mr Lyford; (2) è arrivato mentre eravamo a pranzo, e ha partecipato al nostro elegante intrattenimento. Non mi sono vergognata di chiedergli di sedere a tavola, perché c'era della minestra di piselli, una costoletta di maiale, e un budino. Vorrebbe che la mamma diventasse gialla e sviluppasse un'eruzione cutanea, ma non farà nessuna delle due cose. Ieri mattina sono stata a Deane. Mary stava molto bene, ma non recupera le forze molto rapidamente. Quando l'ho vista così in forma il terzo e il sesto giorno, mi aspettavo di vederla tornare in salute come sempre entro un paio di settimane. Ieri James è andato a Ibthorp a trovare la suocera e la figlia. In questo periodo Letty è con Mary, naturalmente felicissima, e in estasi per il bambino. Mary non gestisce la situazione in modo tale da farmi desiderare di essere al suo posto. Non ha un aspetto molto ordinato; non ha una vestaglia per quando si alza; le cortine sono troppo sottili, e le cose non hanno quella comodità e quello stile necessari a rendere invidiabile la sua situazione. Elizabeth era davvero graziosa con la cuffia carina e pulita portata in modo impeccabile e l'abito tutto bianco e ordinato. Ora stiamo sempre in soggiorno, il che mi piace molto; mi sento sempre molto più elegante lì che in salotto. Ancora nessuna notizia da Kintbury. Eliza si prende gioco della nostra impazienza. (3) Giovedì scorso stava molto bene. Chi sta per sposare Miss Maria Montresor, e che cosa ne sarà di Miss Mulcaster? Trovo molto comoda la veste trapuntata, ma spero che tu non indossi la tua molto spesso. Da quando sono tornata a casa mi sono fatta due o tre cuffie da mettere la sera, e mi risparmiano un'infinità di tormenti per acconciarmi i capelli, cosa che al momento mi permette di non preoccuparmene al di là di lavarli e spazzolarli, poiché i capelli lunghi sono sempre in trecce che non si vedono, e quelli corti si arricciano abbastanza senza bisogno di diavolini. Me li ha tagliati da poco Mr Butler. Non c'è ragione di supporre che Miss Morgan sia morta dopotutto. Ieri Mr Lyford ci ha molto gratificato lodando il montone del babbo, che tutti considerano il migliore che abbiano mai mangiato. John Bond comincia a sentirsi vecchio, cosa che i John Bond non dovrebbero fare, e non all'altezza di lavori molto pesanti; è stato quindi assunto un uomo per prendere il suo posto come uomo di fatica, e John si occuperà delle pecore. Le persone assunte non sono di più di quelle di prima, credo; solo che sono uomini invece di ragazzi. Almeno immagino che sia così, ma sai che di queste cose non me ne intendo. Lizzie Bond ha cominciato l'apprendistato da Miss Small, così possiamo sperare che fra qualche anno sarà capace di rovinare i vestiti. Il babbo si è rivolto a Mr May per una birreria per Robert, su sua richiesta, e a Mr Deane, di Winchester, per la stessa cosa. È stata un'idea della mamma, che ha pensato che lui sarebbe stato fiero di fare un favore a un parente di Edward in cambio del fatto che Edward aveva accettato il suo denaro. La risposta è stata davvero molto cortese, ma ha detto che al momento non ci sono locali liberi. May si aspetta di averne presto uno vuoto a Farnham, così forse Nanny potrà avere l'onore di spillare birra per il Vescovo. (4) Domani scriverò a Frank. Giovedì Charles Powlett ha dato un ballo, con grande scompiglio per tutto il vicinato, ovviamente, che, lo sai, nutre un vivissimo interesse per lo stato delle sue finanze, e vive nella speranza di vederlo presto rovinato. Siamo molto ben disposti a farci piacere la nostra nuova domestica; non sa nulla di latticini, questo è certo, il che, nella nostra famiglia, depone alquanto contro di lei, ma le si dovrà insegnare tutto. In breve, abbiamo patito così a lungo il disagio di essere senza una domestica, che siamo determinati a farcela piacere, e per lei sarà difficile scontentarci. Finora, sembra che sappia cucinare molto bene, gode di una salute non comune, e dice di saper lavorare bene con l'ago. Domenica. - Il babbo è contento di sentire notizie così buone dei maiali di Edward, e vuole che sappia, come incoraggiamento alla sua predilezione per loro, che Lord Bolton è particolarmente interessato ai suoi maiali, ha fatto fare porcili dalla linea molto elegante, e fa loro visita ogni mattina appena alzato.

Con affetto, tua
J.A.



(1) Le Faye presume che in questo punto ci sia un errore nella trascrizione della lettera, e ritiene che JA abbia scritto "You and my Brother", riferendosi al fratello Edward, nella cui residenza di Godmersham era Cassandra, in quanto sarebbe strano il riferimento alla madre, che era con lei a Steventon. In effetti, però, JA potrebbe anche riferirsi alle preoccupazioni della sorella e della madre.

(2) John Lyford era il medico di Mrs. Austen.

(3) Eliza Fowle era incinta.

(4) Farnham Castle era una delle residenze del vescovo di Winchester.

14
(Tuesday 18 - Wednesday 19 December 1798)
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Steventon Tuesday Dec:r 18th

My dear Cassandra

Your letter came quite as soon as I expected, and so your letters will always do, because I have made it a rule not to expect them till they come, in which I think I consult the ease of us both. - It is a great satisfaction to us to hear that your Business is in a way to be settled, & so settled as to give you as little inconvenience as possible. - You are very welcome to my father's name, & to his Services if they are ever required in it. - I shall keep my ten pounds too to wrap myself up in next winter. - I took the liberty a few days ago of asking your Black velvet Bonnet to lend me its cawl, which it very readily did, & by which I have been enabled to give a considerable improvement of dignity to my Cap, which was before too nidgetty to please me. - I shall wear it on Thursday, but I hope you will not be offended with me for following your advice as to its ornaments only in part - I still venture to retain the narrow silver round it, put twice round without any bow, & instead of the black military feather shall put in the Coquelicot one, as being smarter; - & besides Coquelicot is to be all the fashion this winter. - After the Ball, I shall probably make it entirely black. - I am sorry that our dear Charles begins to feel the Dignity of Ill-usage. - My father will write to Admiral Gambier. - He must already have received so much satisfaction from his acquaintance & Patronage of Frank, that he will be delighted I dare say to have another of the family introduced to him. - I think it would be very right in Charles to address Sir Thos on the occasion; tho' I cannot approve of your scheme of writing to him (which you communicated to me a few nights ago) to request him to come home & convey You to Steventon. - To do you justice however, You had some doubts of the propriety of such a measure yourself. - I am very much obliged to my dear little George for his message, for his Love at least; - his Duty I suppose was only in consequence of some hint of my favourable intentions towards him from his father or Mother. - I am sincerely rejoiced however that I ever was born, since it has been the means of procuring him a dish of Tea. - Give my best Love to him. This morning has been made very gay to us, by visits from our two lively Neighbours Mr Holder & Mr John Harwood. - I have received a very civil note from Mrs Martin requesting my name as a Subscriber to her Library which opens the 14th of January, & my name, or rather Yours is accordingly given. My Mother finds the Money. - Mary subscribes too, which I am glad of, but hardly expected. - As an inducement to subscribe Mrs Martin tells us that her Collection is not to consist only of Novels, but of every kind of Literature, &c &c - She might have spared this pretension to our family, who are great Novel-readers & not ashamed of being so; - but it was necessary I suppose to the self-consequence of half her Subscribers. - I hope & imagine that Edward Taylor is to inherit all Sir Edw: Dering's fortune as well as all his own father's. - I took care to tell Mrs Lefroy of your calling on her Mother, & she seemed pleased with it. - I enjoyed the hard black Frosts of last week very much, & one day while they lasted walked to Deane by myself. - I do not know that I ever did such a thing in my life before. - Charles Powlett has been very ill, but is getting well again; - his wife is discovered to be everything that the Neighbourhood could wish her, silly & cross as well as extravagant. Earle Harwood & his friend Mr Bailey came to Deane yesterday, but are not to stay above a day or two. - Earle has got the appointment to a Prison ship at Portsmouth, which he has been for some time desirous of having; & he & his wife are to live on board for the future. - We dine now at half after Three, & have done dinner I suppose before you begin - We drink tea at half after six. - I am afraid you will despise us. - My father reads Cowper to us in the evening, to which I listen when I can. How do you spend your Evenings? - I guess that Eliz:th works, that you read to her, & that Edward goes to sleep. - My Mother continues hearty, her appetite & nights are very good, but her Bowels are still not entirely settled, & she sometimes complains of an Asthma, a Dropsy, Water in her Chest & a Liver Disorder. The third Miss Irish Lefroy is going to be married to a Mr Courtenay, but whether James or Charles I do not know. - Miss Lyford is gone into Suffolk with her Brother & Miss Lodge -. Everybody is now very busy in making up an income for the two latter. Miss Lodge has only 800£ of her own, & it is not supposed that her Father can give her much, therefore the good offices of the Neighbourhood will be highly acceptable. - John Lyford means to take pupils. - James Digweed has had a very ugly cut - how could it happen? - It happened by a young horse which he had lately purchased, & which he was trying to back into its stable; - the Animal kicked him down with his forefeet, & kicked a great hole in his head; - he scrambled away as soon as he could, but was stunned for a time, & suffered a good deal of pain afterwards. - Yesterday he got up the Horse again, & for fear of something worse, was forced to throw himself off. - Wednesday. - I have changed my mind, & changed the trimmings of my Cap this morning; they are now such as you suggested; - I felt as if I should not prosper if I strayed from your directions, & I think it makes me look more like Lady Conyngham now than it did before, which is all that one lives for now. - I beleive I shall make my new gown like my robe, but the back of the latter is all in a peice with the tail, & will 7 yards enable me to copy it in that respect? Mary went to Church on Sunday, & had the weather been smiling, we should have seen her here before this time. - Perhaps I may stay at Manydown as long as Monday, but not longer - Martha sends me word that she is too busy to write to me now, & but for your letter, I should have supposed her deep in the study of Medecine preparatory to their removal from Ibthrop. - -The letter to Gambier goes today. - I expect a very stupid Ball, there will be nobody worth dancing with, & nobody worth talking to but Catherine; for I believe Mrs Lefroy will not be there; Lucy is to go with Mrs Russell. - People get so horridly poor & economical in this part of the World, that I have no patience with them. - Kent is the only place for happiness, Everybody is rich there; - I must do similar justice however to the Windsor neighbourhood. - I have been forced to let James & Miss Debary have two sheets of your Drawing paper, but they sha'nt have any more. - There are not above 3 or 4 left, besides one of a smaller & richer sort. - Perhaps you may want some more if you come thro' Town in your return, or rather buy some more, for your wanting it will not depend on your coming thro' Town I imagine. -I have just heard from Martha, & Frank - his letter was written on the 12th Nov:r - all well, & nothing particular.

J.A.

Miss Austen
Godmersham Park
Faversham
Kent

14
(martedì 18 - mercoledì 19 dicembre 1798)
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Steventon martedì 18 dicembre

Mia cara Cassandra

La tua lettera è arrivata proprio quando me la sarei aspettata, e così sarà sempre per le tue lettere, poiché ho stabilito la regola di non aspettarmele finché non arrivano, e nel far ciò credo di tenere conto della tranquillità di entrambe. - È una grande soddisfazione per noi sapere che la tua Questione stia per essere risolta, e risolta in modo da procurarti il minimo disturbo possibile. (1) - Il nome del babbo è a tua disposizione, e i suoi Servigi se ce ne sarà bisogno. - Anch'io terrò le mie dieci sterline per coprirmi bene quest'inverno. - Qualche giorno fa mi sono presa la libertà di chiedere alla tua Cuffia di velluto Nero di prestarmi la sua calotta, cosa che ha fatto senza alcuna difficoltà, e che mi ha permesso di procurare un considerevole aumento di dignità al mio Cappellino, che prima era troppo frivolo per piacermi. - Lo metterò giovedì, ma spero che non ti offenderai con me per aver seguito solo in parte i tuoi consigli su come abbellirlo - mi azzarderò a lasciarci intorno il nastrino argentato, girato due volte senza nessun fiocco, e invece della piuma militare nera ce ne metterò una color Papavero, che trovo più elegante; - e inoltre il color Papavero sarà di gran moda questo inverno. - Dopo il Ballo, lo farò probabilmente tutto nero. - Mi dispiace che la Dignità del nostro caro Charles cominci a risentire delle Umiliazioni. - Il babbo scriverà all'Ammiraglio Gambier. (2) - Egli deve già aver avuto così tante soddisfazioni dalla conoscenza e dal Patrocinio accordato a Frank, che immagino sarà contento di conoscere un altro della famiglia. - Credo che sarebbe giustissimo da parte di Charles rivolgersi a Sir Thomas (3) in questa occasione; tuttavia non me la sento di approvare il tuo progetto di scrivergli (come mi hai detto qualche sera fa) per chiedergli di tornare a casa e portarti a Steventon. - Per renderti giustizia comunque, Tu stessa avevi qualche dubbio sull'opportunità di un tale proposito. - Sono molto obbligata col mio caro piccolo George per il suo messaggio, per il suo affetto almeno; - il suo Dovere suppongo fosse una conseguenza di qualche allusione alle mie benevole intenzioni nei suoi confronti da parte del padre o della Madre. - Sono sinceramente contenta comunque di essere nata, (4) dato che è stato il mezzo per procurargli una razione di Tè. - Salutalo con tutto il mio affetto. La nostra mattinata è stata resa molto allegra, dalle visite dei nostri dei due vivaci Vicini Mr Holder e Mr John Harwood. - Io ho ricevuto una nota molto cortese da Mrs Martin con la richiesta di Abbonarmi alla sua Biblioteca che apre il 14 gennaio, e di conseguenza le ho dato il mio nome, o meglio il Tuo. I Soldi li mette la Mamma. - Anche Mary si abbona, il che mi fa piacere, ma non me l'aspettavo. - Come incentivo all'abbonamento Mrs Martin ci dice che la sua Collezione non consiste solo di Romanzi, ma di ogni genere di Letteratura, ecc. ecc. - Avrebbe potuto risparmiarsi questa ostentazione con la nostra famiglia, dove ci sono grandi lettori di Romanzi che non si vergognano di esserlo; - ma suppongo che fosse necessaria per l'auto-compiacimento di metà dei suoi Abbonati. - Spero e immagino che Edward Taylor debba ereditare tutto il patrimonio di Sir Edward Dering così come tutto quello di suo padre. - Ho avuto cura di dire a Mrs Lefroy della tua visita a sua Madre, e mi è sembrata compiaciuta della cosa. - Ho apprezzato molto le cupe e intense Gelate della settimana scorsa, e mentre erano all'opera un giorno ho fatto una passeggiata da sola a Deane. - Non ricordo di aver mai fatto una cosa del genere in vita mia. - Charles Powlett è stato molto male, ma si sta riprendendo; - sua moglie si è rivelata essere tutto ciò che il vicinato desiderava che fosse, sciocca e stizzosa quanto spendacciona. Earle Harwood e il suo amico Mr Bailey sono arrivati ieri a Deane, ma non si fermeranno più di un giorno o due. - Earle ha avuto un incarico su una Galera a Portsmouth, cosa che desiderava da un po'; e lui e la moglie in futuro vivranno a bordo. - Adesso pranziamo alle tre e mezza, e immagino che finiamo prima che voi cominciate - Prendiamo il tè alle sei e mezza. - Temo che ci disprezzerai. - La sera il babbo ci legge Cowper, che ascolto quando posso. Come passate le Serate? - Immagino che Elizabeth lavori, che tu le legga qualcosa, e che Edward si addormenti. - La Mamma prosegue bene, appetito e sonno sono ottimi, ma gli Intestini non sono ancora completamente a posto, e talvolta si lamenta dell'Asma, dell'Idropisia, di Acqua nei Polmoni e di Disturbi al fegato. La terza Miss Lefroy irlandese si sta per sposare con un Mr Courtenay, ma non so se James o Charles. - Miss Lyford è andata nel Suffolk con il Fratello e Miss Lodge -. Ora sono tutti occupati a prevedere le entrate di questi ultimi due. Miss Lodge ha solo 800 sterline di suo, e si suppone che il Padre non possa darle molto, perciò i buoni uffici del Vicinato saranno molto ben accetti. - John Lyford intende prendere degli alunni. - James Digweed si è fatto un taglio molto brutto - com'è successo? - È successo a causa di un cavallo giovane che aveva comprato da poco, e che stava cercando di far entrare nella stalla; - l'Animale l'ha buttato a terra con un calcio delle zampe anteriori, e gli ha fatto un bel buco in testa; - lui si è trascinato via non appena ha potuto, ma per un po' è rimasto stordito, e poi ha sofferto molto. - Ieri ha montato di nuovo il Cavallo, e per paura di qualcosa di peggio, è stato costretto a buttarsi giù. - Mercoledì. - Ho cambiato idea, e stamattina ho cambiato le guarnizioni del mio Cappellino; ora sono come avevi suggerito tu; - sentivo che non avrei potuto avere successo se avessi deviato dalla direzione indicata da te, e credo che ora mi faccia assomigliare di più a Lady Conyngham (5) di quanto lo facesse prima, il che è tutto ciò che si possa desiderare di questi tempi. - Credo che dovrò farmi il vestito uguale all'abito lungo, ma quest'ultimo ha la parte dietro che è tutt'uno con lo strascico, e mi basteranno 7 iarde per copiare questo particolare? Domenica Mary è andata in Chiesa, e se il tempo fosse stato clemente, l'avremmo vista qui prima. - Forse potrei restare a Manydown fino a lunedì, ma non di più - Martha mi manda a dire che ora è troppo occupata per scrivermi, se non fosse stato per la tua lettera, l'avrei immaginata immersa nello studio della Medicina in attesa del loro trasferimento da Ibthrop. - La lettera per Gambier partirà oggi. - Mi aspetto un Ballo molto stupido, non ci sarà nessuno con cui valga la pena di ballare, e nessuno con cui valga la pena di chiacchierare eccetto Catherine; perché credo che Mrs Lefroy non ci sarà; Lucy verrà con Mrs Russell. - La gente sta diventando così terribilmente povera e parsimoniosa in questa parte del Mondo, che non ho pazienza con loro. - Il Kent è la sola sede della felicità, là sono tutti ricchi; - devo comunque rendere giustizia allo stesso modo alla zona di Windsor. - Sono stata costretta a lasciare che James e Miss Debary si prendessero due dei tuoi fogli da Disegno, ma non ne avranno più. - Non ne sono rimasti più di 3 o 4, oltre a uno più piccolo e di maggior pregio. - Forse potresti averne bisogno di qualcuno in più se al tuo ritorno passi per Londra, o piuttosto ne comprerai qualcuno in più, perché immagino che il bisogno non derivi dal tuo passare per Londra. - Ho appena ricevuto notizie da Martha e da Frank - la lettera di lui è stata scritta il 12 nov. - tutto bene, e niente di particolare.

J.A.



(1) Qui JA potrebbe riferirsi all'eredità di mille sterline del fidanzato di Cassandra, Tom Fowle, morto a Santo Domingo il 13 febbraio 1797. Il testamento però era stato aperto il 5 maggio 1797 e convalidato il 10 ottobre; sembra perciò improbabile che la questione possa essersi trascinata per più di un anno.

(2) Charles Austen mordeva il freno su una piccola nave e aveva chiesto di essere trasferito su una più grande. Per la risposta dell'ammiraglio Gambier, riguardante anche l'altro fratello marinaio di JA, Francis, vedi la lettera successiva.

(3) Thomas William, marito di una cugina di JA, Jane Cooper, morta nell'agosto 1798.

(4) Due giorni prima di questa lettera, il 16 dicembre, JA aveva compiuto ventitré anni.

(5) Elizabeth Denison, che aveva sposato nel 1794 il barone Conyngham e godeva di grande prestigio alla corte di Giorgio III.

15
(Monday 24 - Wednesday 26 Decembre 1798)
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Steventon Monday Night Dec:r 24th

My dear Cassandra,

I have got some pleasant news for you, which I am eager to communicate, & therefore begin my letter sooner, tho' I shall not send it sooner than usual. - Admiral Gambier in reply to my father's application writes as follows. - "As it is usual to keep young officers in small vessels, it being most proper on account of their inexperience, & it being also a situation where they are more in the way of learning their Duty, Your Son has been continued in the Scorpion; but I have mentioned to the Board of Admiralty his wish to be in a Frigate, and when a proper opportunity offers & it is judged that he has taken his Turn in a small Ship, I hope he will be removed. - With regard to your Son now in the London, I am glad I can give you the assurance that his promotion is likely to take place very soon, as Lord Spencer has been so good as to say he would include him in an arrangement that he proposes making in a short time relative to some promotions in that quarter." - There! - I may now finish my letter, & go & hang myself, for I am sure I can neither write nor do anything which will not appear insipid to you after this. - Now I really think he will soon be made, & only wish we could communicate our fore-knowledge of the Event, to him whom it principally concerns. - My father has written to Daysh to desire that he will inform us if he can, when the Commission is sent. - Your cheif wish is now ready to be accomplished; & could Lord Spencer give happiness to Martha at the same time, what a joyful heart he would make of Yours! - I have sent the same extract of the sweets of Gambier to Charles, who poor fellow! tho' he sinks into nothing but an humble attendant on the Hero of the peice, will I hope, be contented with the prospect held out to him. - By what the Admiral says it appears as if he had been designedly kept in the Scorpion -. But I will not torment myself with Conjectures & suppositions; Facts shall satisfy me. - Frank had not heard from any of us for ten weeks, when he wrote to me on the 12th of November, in consequence of Lord St Vincents being removed to Gibraltar. - When his Commission is sent however, it will not be so long on its' road as our letters, because all the Government dispatches are forwarded by Land to his Lordship from Lisbon, with great regularity. - I returned from Manydown this morning, & found my Mother certainly in no respect worse than when I left her. - She does not like the cold Weather, but that we cannot help. - I spent my time very quietly & very pleasantly with Catherine. Miss Blachford is agreable enough; I do not want People to be very agreable, as it saves me the trouble of liking them a great deal. - I found only Catherine & her when I got to Manydown on Thursday, we dined together & went together to Worting to seek the protection of Mrs Clarke, with whom were Lady Mildmay, her eldest son, & a Mr & Mrs Hoare. - Our ball was very thin, but by no means unpleasant. - There were 31 People & only 11 Ladies out of the Number, & but five single women in the room. - Of the Gentlemen present You may have some idea from the list of my Partners. Mr Wood, G. Lefroy, Rice, a Mr Butcher (belonging to the Temples, a sailor & not of the 11th Light Dragoons) Mr Temple (not the horrid one of all) Mr Wm Orde (Cousin to the Kingsclere Man) Mr John Harwood, & Mr Calland, who appeared as usual with his hat in his hand, & stood every now & then behind Catherine & me to be talked to & abused for not dancing. - We teized him however into it at last; - I was very glad to see him again after so long a separation, & he was altogether rather the Genius & Flirt of the Evening. - He enquired after You. - There were twenty Dances, & I danced them all, & without any fatigue. - I was glad to find myself capable of dancing so much & with so much satisfaction as I did; - from my slender enjoyment of the Ashford Balls, (as Assemblies for dancing) I had not thought myself equal to it, but in cold weather & with few couples I fancy I could just as well dance for a week together as for half an hour. - My black Cap was openly admired by Mrs Lefroy, & secretly I imagine by every body else in the room. - Tuesday.- I thank you for your long letter, which I will endeavour to deserve by writing the rest of this as closely as possible. - I am full of Joy at much of your information; that you should have been to a Ball, & have danced at it, & supped with the Prince, & that you should meditate the purchase of a new muslin Gown, are delightful circumstances. - I am determined to buy a handsome one whenever I can, & I am so tired & ashamed of half my present stock that I even blush at the sight of the wardrobe which contains them. - But I will not be much longer libelled by the possession of my coarse spot, I shall turn it into a petticoat very soon. - I wish you a merry Christmas, but no compliments of the Season. - Poor Edward! It is very hard that he who has everything else in the World that he can wish for, should not have good health too. - But I hope with the assistance of Bowel complaints, Faintnesses & Sicknesses, he will soon be restored to that Blessing likewise. - If his nervous complaint proceeded from a suppression of something that ought to be thrown out, which does not seem unlikely, the first of those Disorders may really be a remedy, & I sincerely wish it may, for I know no one more deserving of happiness without alloy than Edward is. - My Mother's spirits are not affected by her complication of disorders; on the contrary they are altogether as good as ever; nor are you to suppose that these maladies are often thought of. - She has at times had a tendency towards another which always releives her, & that is, a gouty swelling & sensation about the ancles. - I cannot determine what to do about my new Gown; I wish such things were to be bought ready made. - I have some hopes of meeting Martha at the Christening at Deane next Tuesday, & shall see what she can do for me. - I want to have something suggested which will give me no trouble of thought or direction. - Again I return to my Joy that you danced at Ashford, & that you supped with the Prince. - I can perfectly comprehend Mrs Cage's distress & perplexity. - She has all those kind of foolish & incomprehensible feelings which would make her fancy herself uncomfortable in such a party. - I love her however in spite of all her Nonsense. Pray give t'other Miss Austen's compts to Edw: Bridges when you see him again. I insist upon your persevering in your intention of buying a new Gown; I am sure you must want one, & as you will have 5Gs due in a week's time, I am certain you may afford it very well, & if you think you cannot, I will give you the Body lining. - Of my charities to the poor since I came home you shall have a faithful account. - I have given a p.r of Worsted Stockgs to Mary Hutchins, Dame Kew, Mary Steevens, & Dame Staples; a shift to Hannah Staples, & a shawl to Betty Dawkins; amounting in all to about half a guinea. - But I have no reason to suppose that the Battys would accept of anything, because I have not made them the offer. - I am glad to hear such a good account of Harriet Bridges; she goes on now as young ladies of 17 ought to do; admired & admiring; in a much more rational way than her three elder Sisters, who had so little of that kind of Youth. - I dare say she fancies Major Elrington as agreable as Warren, & if she can think so, it is very well. - I was to have dined at Deane to day, but the weather is so cold that I am not sorry to be kept at home by the appearance of Snow. - We are to have Company to dinner on friday; the three Digweeds & James. - We shall be a nice silent party I suppose. - Seize upon the Scissors as soon as you possibly can on the receipt of this. I only fear your being too late to secure the prize. The Lords of the Admiralty will have enough of our applications at present, for I hear from Charles that he has written to Lord Spencer himself to be removed. I am afraid his serene Highness will be in a passion, & order some of our heads to be cut off. - My Mother wants to know whether Edwd has ever made the Hen House which they planned together. - I am rejoiced to learn from Martha that they certainly continue at Ibthrop, & I have just heard that I am sure of meeting Martha at the Christening. -You deserve a longer letter than this; but it is my unhappy fate seldom to treat people so well as they deserve. - God bless You. - Yours affec:tely Jane Austen

Wednesday. - The Snow came to nothing yesterday, so I did go to Deane, & returned home at 9 o'clock at night in the little carriage - & without being very cold. - Miss Debary dines with us on friday as well as the Gentlemen.

Miss Austen
Godmersham Park
Faversham
Kent

15
(lunedì 24 - mercoledì 26 dicembre 1798)
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Steventon lunedì sera 24 dic.

Mia cara Cassandra,

Ho delle piacevoli notizie per te, che non vedo l'ora di comunicarti, e quindi comincio prima la mia lettera, anche se non la spedirò prima del solito. - L'Ammiraglio Gambier in risposta alla richiesta del babbo scrive quel che segue. - "Visto che è normale tenere gli ufficiali giovani su vascelli piccoli, perché è più opportuno in ragione della loro inesperienza, e anche perché sono nella situazione di poter meglio apprendere il loro Dovere, Vostro Figlio è stato confermato sullo Scorpion; tuttavia ho segnalato al Consiglio dell'Ammiragliato il suo desiderio di passare su una Fregata, e quando si presenterà l'occasione opportuna e si riterrà che egli abbia concluso il suo Turno su una Nave piccola, spero che sarà trasferito. - Per quanto riguarda vostro Figlio ora sulla London, sono lieto di potervi assicurare che la sua promozione avrà probabilmente luogo molto presto, dato che Lord Spencer è stato così buono da dire che lo vuole inserire in una disposizione che si propone di emanare tra breve relativa ad alcune promozioni in quella cerchia." - Ecco! - ora posso concludere la lettera, e andare a impiccarmi, perché sono certa di non poter né scrivere né fare altro che non ti appaia insignificante dopo queste notizie. - Ora credo davvero che sarà presto promosso, e vorrei solo che potessimo comunicare la nostra conoscenza anticipata dell'Evento, a colui che ne è il diretto interessato. - Il babbo ha scritto a Daysh per pregarlo di informarci se può, quando la Commissione lo divulgherà. - Il tuo principale desiderio è prossimo a realizzarsi; e se Lord Spencer potesse contemporaneamente rendere felice Martha, (1) come si colmerebbe di gioia il Tuo cuore! - Ho mandato lo stesso brano delle dolcezze di Gambier a Charles, che poverino! anche se ridotto a nulla più di un umile comprimario dell'Eroe della pièce, voglio sperare, che si accontenti della prospettiva offerta a lui. - Da quello che dice l'Ammiraglio sembra come se sia stato lasciato di proposito sullo Scorpion -. Ma non voglio tormentarmi con Congetture e supposizioni; saranno i Fatti a parlare. - Frank non aveva avuto notizie da nessuno di noi da dieci settimane, quando mi ha scritto il 12 novembre, a seguito del trasferimento a Gibilterra di Lord St Vincent. - Comunque quando gli sarà mandata la Nomina, non seguirà il lungo iter delle nostre lettere, perché tutti i dispacci Governativi sono inoltrati a sua Signoria via Terra da Lisbona, con grande regolarità. - Stamattina sono tornata da Manydown, e ho trovato la Mamma sicuramente sotto nessun aspetto peggiore di quando l'avevo lasciata. - Non le piace il freddo, ma in questo non possiamo essere d'aiuto. - Ho passato il tempo con Catherine in modo molto tranquillo e piacevole. Miss Blachford è abbastanza simpatica; non voglio che la Gente sia troppo simpatica, così posso risparmiarmi dal farmeli piacere troppo. - Quando giovedì sono arrivata a Manydown ho trovato solo Catherine e lei, abbiamo pranzato insieme e insieme siamo andate a Worting a chiedere di farci da accompagnatrice a Mrs Clarke, con la quale c'erano Lady Mildmay, il primogenito, e un certo Mr Hoare con la moglie. - Il ballo è stato molto esiguo, ma niente affatto noioso. - In sala c'erano 31 Persone e solo 11 Signore nel Gruppo, e non più di cinque nubili. - Puoi farti un'idea dei Signori presenti dalla lista dei miei Cavalieri. Mr Wood, G. Lefroy, Rice, un certo Mr Butcher (venuto con i Temple, un marinaio e non dell'11° Dragoni Leggeri) Mr Temple (non quello orrendo) Mr William Orde (Cugino del tizio di Kingsclere) Mr John Harwood, e Mr Calland, che è comparso come al solito con il cappello in mano, e che di tanto in tanto si metteva dietro Catherine e me per chiacchierare ed essere maltrattato perché non ballava. - Comunque a forza di stuzzicarlo alla fine si è deciso; - sono stata molto contenta di rivederlo dopo un periodo così lungo, e nel complesso è stato lo Spirito e il Flirt della Serata. - Ha chiesto di Te. - Ci sono stati venti Balli, e io li ho ballati tutti, e senza nessuna fatica. - Sono stata contenta di scoprirmi capace di ballare così tanto e con così tanta soddisfazione; - dal mio scarso divertimento ai Balli di Ashford, (dato l'Assembramento per ballare) non avrei mai pensato di essere in grado di farlo, ma con il fresco e con poche coppie immagino che potrei ballare per una settimana di fila come se fosse mezzora. - Il mio Cappellino nero è stato ammirato apertamente da Mrs Lefroy, e immagino segretamente da chiunque altro in sala. - Martedì. Ti ringrazio per la lunga lettera, che cercherò di meritare scrivendo il resto di questa più fittamente possibile. - Molte delle informazioni che mi dai mi riempiono di Gioia; che tu sia stata a un Ballo, e che hai ballato, e cenato con il Principe, (2) e che stai meditando di acquistare un Abito nuovo di mussolina, sono circostanze deliziose. - Io sono determinata a comprarne uno molto bello non appena potrò, e sono così stanca e mi vergogno talmente di metà del mio guardaroba attuale che arrossisco al solo guardare l'armadio che lo contiene. - Ma non sarò ancora a lungo oltraggiata dal possesso del mio vestitino a pois, lo trasformerò molto presto in una sottoveste. - Ti auguro buon Natale, ma nessun augurio per la Stagione festiva. - Povero Edward! È molto triste per lui che ha qualsiasi cosa al Mondo possa desiderare, non godere anche di buona salute. - Ma mi auguro che con l'aiuto di disturbi Intestinali, Debolezze e Nausee, possa presto ristabilirsi in quella condizione Benedetta. - Se il suo disturbo nervoso derivasse dalla pressione di qualcosa che deve essere espulso, il che non sembra improbabile, il primo di questi Malanni potrebbe davvero essere un rimedio, e mi auguro sinceramente che lo sia, perché non conosco nessuno più meritevole di una felicità senza macchia di quanto lo sia Edward. - L'umore della mamma non è influenzato dall'aumento dei suoi disturbi; al contrario è tutto sommato più buono che mai; né devi supporre che queste malattie siano spesso immaginarie. - Alle volte ha avuto una tendenza verso un'altra che le dà sempre sollievo, e cioè, una sensazione di gonfiore gottoso vicino alle caviglie. - Non riesco a decidere che cosa fare circa il mio nuovo Vestito; mi piacerebbe che cose del genere si potessero comprare bell'e fatte. - Ho qualche speranza di incontrare Martha al Battesimo a Deane martedì prossimo, (3) e vedrò quello che può fare per me. - Vorrei che mi si suggerisse qualcosa che non mi dia il fastidio di pensare o predisporre. - Rinnovo la mia Gioia per il tuo ballo ad Ashford, e per la tua cena con il Principe. - Riesco perfettamente a comprendere il disagio e la perplessità di Mrs Cage. - È preda di tutte quelle sensazioni sciocche e incomprensibili che la fanno sentire fuori posto in un ricevimento del genere. - Comunque le voglio bene a dispetto di tutte le sue sciocchezze. Ti prego di porgere gli omaggi dell'altra Miss Austen a Edward Bridges quando lo vedi. Insisto affinché perseveri nel tuo proposito di comprare un Vestito nuovo; sono sicura che ne hai bisogno, e dato che in settimana avrai le 5 ghinee dovute, (4) sono certa che puoi benissimo permettertelo, e se pensi di no, ti offrirò io la Fodera. - Ti farò un fedele resoconto delle mie opere di carità per i poveri da quando sono tornata a casa. - Ho dato un paio di Calze di Lana a Mary Hutchins, alla Signora Kew, a Mary Steevens, e a Madama Staples; una camicetta a Hannah Staples, e uno scialle a Betty Dawkins; il tutto ammonta a circa mezza ghinea. - Ma non ho motivo di supporre che i Batty avrebbero accettato qualcosa, perché non gliel'ho offerta. - Sono contenta di avere notizie così buone di Harriet Bridges; ora fa quello che dovrebbe fare una signorina di 17 anni; essere ammirata e ammirare; un comportamento molto più ragionevole delle sue tre Sorelle maggiori, che hanno avuto così pochi piaceri di Gioventù. (5) - Credo che ritenga il Maggiore Elrington simpatico quanto Warren, e se la pensa così, va benissimo. - Oggi avrei dovuto pranzare a Deane, ma fa così freddo che non mi dispiacerebbe essere trattenuta a casa dalla comparsa della Neve. - Venerdì avremo Ospiti a pranzo; i tre Digweed e James. - Suppongo che sarà un ricevimento piacevolmente silenzioso. - Impossessati delle Forbici non appena puoi quando riceverai questa lettera. Ho solo paura che sarai troppo lenta per assicurarti il bottino. I Lord dell'Ammiragliato al momento ne avranno abbastanza delle nostre richieste, perché ho saputo da Charles che ha scritto a Lord Spencer in persona per essere trasferito. Temo che sua Altezza serenissima sarà in collera, e ordinerà di tagliare qualcuna delle nostre teste. - La Mamma vuole sapere se Edward ha mai realizzato il Pollaio che avevano progettato insieme. - Sono felice di apprendere da Martha che rimarranno certamente a Ibthrop, e ho appena saputo che incontrerò sicuramente Martha al Battesimo. - Meriteresti una lettera più lunga di questa; ma è il mio crudele destino riuscire raramente a trattare la gente come merita. - Dio Ti benedica. - Con affetto, tua Jane Austen

Mercoledì. - Ieri la Nevicata si è risolta in un nulla di fatto, così sono andata a Deane, e sono tornata a casa alle 9 di sera con la carrozza piccola - e senza sentire troppo freddo. - Venerdì Miss Debary e i Signori pranzano con noi.



(1) Martha Lloyd aveva avuto una delusione amorosa con un certo "Mr W." (vedi la lettera 10) e le due sorelle speravano che trovasse qualcuno con cui consolarsi.

(2) Il principe William-Frederick, secondo duca di Gloucester (dal 1805), che probabilmente, essendo generale, era nel Kent per le sue incombenze militari.

(3) Il battesimo del figlio di James, James-Edward Austen-Leigh. L'annotazione sul registro della parrocchia è di mano di JA.

(4) Le sorelle Austen ricevevano venti ghinee l'anno ciascuna per le piccole spese; le cinque si riferiscono perciò probabilmente alla rata trimestrale.

(5) Le tre sorelle Bridges si erano sposate giovanissime, subito dopo aver terminato la scuola.

16
(Friday 28 December 1798)
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


My dear Cassandra

Frank is made. - He was yesterday raised to the Rank of Commander, & appointed to the Petterel Sloop, now at Gibraltar. - A Letter from Daysh has just announced this, & as it is confirmed by a very friendly one from Mr Mathew to the same effect transcribing one from Admiral Gambier to the General, We have no reason to suspect the truth of it. - As soon as you have cried a little for Joy, you may go on, & learn farther that the India House have taken Captn Austen's Petition into Consideration - this comes from Daysh - & likewise that Lieut. Charles John Austen is removed to the Tamer Frigate - this comes from the Admiral. - We cannot find out where the Tamer is, but I hope we shall now see Charles here at all Events. This letter is to be dedicated entirely to Good News. - If you will send my father an account of your Washing & Letter expences &c, he will send You a draft for the amount of it, as well as for your next quarter, & for Edward's Rent. - If you don't buy a muslin Gown now on the strength of this Money, & Frank's promotion, I shall never forgive You. -

Mrs Lefroy has just sent me word that Lady Dortchester means to invite me to her Ball on the 8th of January, which tho' an humble Blessing compared with what the last page records, I do not consider as any Calamity. I cannot write any more now, but I have written enough to make you very happy, & therefore may safely conclude. -

Yours affec:ly
Jane.

Steventon
Friday Decr 28th

Miss Austen,
Godmersham Park
Faversham
Kent

16
(venerdì 28 dicembre 1798)
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Mia cara Cassandra

Frank ce l'ha fatta. - Ieri è stato promosso al Grado di Comandante, e assegnato alla Corvetta Petterel, ora a Gibilterra. - Ci è stato appena annunciato in una Lettera di Daysh, e poiché è confermato da un'altra molto cordiale di Mr Mathew dello stesso tenore che ne riporta una dell'Ammiraglio Gambier al Generale, (1) Non abbiamo motivo di sospettarne l'autenticità. - Non appena avrai finito di piangere un po' dalla Gioia, vai avanti, e potrai sapere che la Compagnia delle Indie ha preso in Considerazione la Petizione del Cap. Austen (2) - questa arriva da Daysh - e inoltre che il Ten. Charles John Austen è stato trasferito sulla Fregata Tamer - questa arriva dall'Ammiraglio. - Non siamo stati in grado di scoprire dov'è la Tamer, ma in ogni Caso spero che ora rivedremo presto Charles. Questa lettera sarà dedicata interamente alle Buone Nuove. - Se manderai al babbo un resoconto delle tue spese per il Bucato e la Posta ecc., lui Ti manderà un ordine di pagamento per il totale, ivi compreso il tuo prossimo trimestre, e l'Affitto di Edward. (3) - Se non ti compri il vestito di mussolina ora in forza di questo Denaro, e della promozione di Frank, non Ti perdonerò mai. -

Mrs Lefroy mi ha appena fatto sapere che Lady Dorchester intende invitarmi al suo Ballo dell'8 gennaio, il che sebbene sia un umile Riconoscimento paragonato con quanto riportato nella pagina precedente, non è certo da considerare una Calamità. Ora non posso scrivere di più, ma ho scritto abbastanza per renderti molto felice, e perciò posso tranquillamente concludere. -

Con affetto, tua
Jane.

Steventon
Venerdì 28 dic.



(1) "Mr Mathew" era il figlio del generale Mathew, padre della prima moglie di James Austen e zio della moglie dell'ammiraglio Gambier.

(2) Francis Austen aveva chiesto il rimborso delle spese sostenute per il suo ritorno in Inghilterra dall'India nel 1793; la questione si trascinava perciò già da alcuni anni, e si risolse solo nel maggio 1801, con il rifiuto del rimborso. Un accenno c'è anche nella lettera 13, nel brano in cui JA parla del plico di lettere preparato dal fratello, che aveva subito un ritardo nella spedizione.

(3) Dall'estratto conto della Hoare's Bank apprendiamo che l'importo totale fu di 12 sterline, 19 scellini e 6 pence; dedotte le 5 ghinee trimestrali (citate nella lettera precedente) le spese ammontavano perciò a poco più di sette sterline e mezzo.

17
(Tuesday 8 - Wednesday 9 January 1799)
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Steventon Tuesday Janry 8th -

My dear Cassandra

You must read your letters over five times in future before you send them, & then perhaps you may find them as entertaining as I do. - I laughed at several parts of the one which I am now answering. - Charles is not come yet, but he must come this morning, or he shall never know what I will do to him. The Ball at Kempshott is this Evening, & I have got him an invitation, though I have not been so considerate as to get him a Partner. But the cases are different between him & Eliza Bailey, for he is not in a dieing way, & may therefore be equal to getting a partner for himself. - I beleive I told You that Monday was to be the Ball Night, for which, & for all other Errors into which I may ever have led You, I now humbly ask your pardon. - Elizabeth is very cruel about my writing Music, - & as a punishment for her, I should insist upon always writing out all hers for her in future, if I were not punishing myself at the same time. - I am tolerably glad to hear that Edward's income is so good a one - as glad as I can at anybody's being rich besides You & me - & I am thoroughly rejoiced to hear of his present to you. - I am not to wear my white sattin cap tonight after all; I am to wear a Mamalouc cap instead, which Charles Fowle sent to Mary, & which she lends me. - It is all the fashion now, worn at the Opera, & by Lady Mildmays at Hackwood Balls - I hate describing such things, & I dare say You will be able to guess what it is like -. I have got over the dreadful epocha of Mantuamaking much better than I expected. - My Gown is made very much like my blue one, which you always told me sat very well, with only these variations; - the sleeves are short, the wrap fuller, the apron comes over it, & a band of the same completes the whole. -

I assure You that I dread the idea of going to Bookham as much as you can do; but I am not without hopes that something may happen to prevent it; Theo' has lost his Election at Baliol, & perhaps they may not be able to see company for some time. - They talk of going to Bath too in the Spring, & perhaps they may be overturned in their way down, & all laid up for the summer.

Wednesday. - I have had a cold & weakness in one of my eyes for some days, which makes Writing neither very pleasant nor very profitable, & which will probably prevent my finishing this letter myself. - My Mother has undertaken to do it for me, & I shall leave the Kempshott Ball for her. You express so little anxiety about my being murdered under Ash Park Copse by Mrs Hulbert's servant, that I have a great mind not to tell you whether I was or not, & shall only say that I did not return home that night or the next, as Martha kindly made room for me in her bed, which was the shut-up one in the new Nursery. - Nurse & the Child slept upon the floor; & there we all were in some confusion & great comfort; - the bed did exceedingly well for us, both to lie awake in & talk till two o'clock, & to sleep in the rest of the night. - I love Martha better than ever, & I mean to go & see her if I can, when she gets home. - We all dined at the Harwoods on Thursday, & the party broke up the next morning. - This complaint in my eye has been a sad bore to me, for I have not been able to read or work in any comfort since friday, but one advantage will be derived from it, for I shall be such a proficient in Music by the time I have got rid of my cold, that I shall be perfectly qualified in that Science at least to take Mr Roope's office at Eastwell next summer; & I am sure of Eliz:th's recommendation, be it only on Harriot's account. - Of my Talent in Drawing I have given specimens in my letters to You, & I have nothing to do, but to invent a few hard names for the Stars. - Mary grows rather more reasonable about her Child's beauty, & says that she does not think him really handsome; but I suspect her moderation to be something like that of W--- W---'s Mama. - Perhaps Mary has told you that they are going to enter more into Dinner parties; the Biggs & Mr Holder dine there tomorrow & I am to meet them; I shall sleep there. Catherine has the honour of giving her name to a set, which will be composed of two Withers, two Heathcotes, a Blachford, & no Bigg except herself. She congratulated me last night on Frank's promotion as if she really felt the Joy she talked of. - My sweet little George! - I am delighted to hear that he has such an inventive Genius as to face-making -. I admired his yellow wafer very much, & hope he will choose the wafer for your next letter. - I wore my Green shoes last night, & took my white fan with me; I am very glad he never threw it into the River. - Mrs Knight giving up the Godmersham Estate to Edward was no such prodigious act of Generosity after all it seems, for she has reserved herself an income out of it still; - this ought to be known, that her conduct may not be over-rated. - I rather think Edward shews the most Magnanimity of the two, in accepting her Resignation with such incumbrances. - The more I write, the better my eye gets, so I shall at least keep on till it is quite well, before I give up my pen to my mother. - Mrs Bramston's little moveable apartment was tolerably filled last night by herself, Mrs H. Blackstone, her two daughters & me. - I do not like the Miss Blackstones; indeed, I was always determined not to like them, so there is the less merit in it. Mrs Bramston was very civil, kind & noisy. - I spent a very pleasant evening, cheifly among the Manydown party -. There was the same kind of supper as last Year, & the same want of chairs. - There were more Dancers than the room could conveniently hold, which is enough to constitute a good Ball at any time. - I do not think I was very much in request -. People were rather apt not to ask me till they could not help it; - One's Consequence you know, varies so much at times without any particular reason -. There was one Gentleman, an officer of the Cheshire, a very good-looking young Man, who I was told wanted very much to be introduced to me; but as he did not want it quite enough to take much trouble in effecting it, We never could bring it about. - I danced with Mr John Wood again, twice with a Mr South a lad from Winchester who I suppose, is as far from being related to the bishop of that Diocese as it is possible to be, with G. Lefroy & J. Harwood, who I think takes to me rather more than he used to do. - One of my gayest actions was sitting down two Dances in preference to having Lord Bolton's eldest son for my Partner, who danced too ill to be endured. - The Miss Charterises were there, & play'd the parts of the Miss Edens with great spirit.- Charles never came! - Naughty Charles. I suppose he could not get superseded in time -. - Miss Debary has replaced your two sheets of Drawing paper, with two of superior size & quality; so I do not grudge her having taken them at all now. - Mr Ludlow & Miss Pugh of Andover are lately married, & so is Mrs Skeete of Basingstoke & Mr French, Chemist of Reading. - I do not wonder at your wanting to read first impressions again, so seldom as you have gone through it, & that so long ago. - I am much obliged to you for meaning to leave my old petticoat behind You; I have long secretly wished it might be done, but had not courage to make the request. Pray mention the name of Maria Montresor's lover when you write next, my Mother wants to know it, & I have not courage to look back into your letters to find it out. - I shall not be able to send this till tomorrow, & You will be disappointed on friday; I am very sorry for it, but I cannot help it. - The partnership between Jeffereys Toomer & Legge is dissolved - the two latter are melted away into nothing, & it is to be hoped that Jeffereys will soon break for the sake of a few heroines whose money he may have. -

I wish you Joy of your Birthday twenty times over. - I shall be able to send this to the post to day, which exalts me to the utmost pinnacle of human felicity, & makes me bask in the sunshine of Prosperity, or gives me any other sensation of pleasure in studied Language which You may prefer. - Do not be angry with me for not filling my Sheet - & beleive me yours affec:ly J. A.

Miss Austen
Godmersham Park
Faversham
Kent

17
(martedì 8 - mercoledì 9 gennaio 1799)
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Steventon martedì 8 gen. -

Mia cara Cassandra

In futuro dovrai leggere le tue lettere più di cinque volte prima di spedirle, e allora forse potrai trovarle divertenti come succede a me. - Ho riso a diversi brani di quella a cui sto rispondendo adesso. - Charles non è ancora arrivato, ma deve arrivare stamattina, altrimenti non saprà che cosa sto facendo per lui. Il Ballo a Kempshott è per questa Sera, e gli ho procurato un invito, anche se non sono stata così sollecita da procurargli una Dama. Ma tra lui ed Eliza Bailey i casi sono diversi, perché lui non sta languendo, e perciò può sentirsi all'altezza di avere una dama tutta per sé. - Credo di averti detto che la Sera del Ballo doveva essere lunedì, e per questo, e per tutti gli altri Errori in cui potrei averti indotta, ti chiedo ora umilmente perdono. - Elizabeth è molto crudele riguardo al mio modo di scrivere Musica, - e come punizione, mi ostinerei a trascriverla per lei in futuro, se allo stesso tempo non fosse una punizione per me. - Sono abbastanza contenta di sapere che le entrate di Edward sono così buone - contenta come potrei esserlo per chiunque diventasse ricco oltre Te e me - e ho gioito oltre misura quando ho saputo del regalo che ti ha fatto. - Stasera tutto considerato non metterò il cappellino di raso bianco; metterò invece il cappellino Mammalucco, (1) che Charles Fowle ha mandato a Mary, e che lei mi presta. - Di questi tempi è di gran moda, è portato all'Opera, e da Lady Mildmays ai Balli di Hackwood - odio descrivere queste cose, e credo che Tu sia in grado di immaginare com'è fatto -. Ho superato molto meglio di quanto mi aspettassi il tremendo periodo della Sartoria. - Il mio Abito è molto simile a quello azzurro, che hai sempre detto che mi stava molto bene, con solo queste modifiche; - le maniche sono corte, lo scialle più ampio, la sopraggonna ha le balze, e una fascia uguale completa il tutto. -

Ti assicuro che l'idea di andare a Bookham mi spaventa quanto spaventa te; ma non ho perso le speranze che possa succedere qualcosa che lo impedisca; Theo ha perso le Elezioni al Baliol, e forse per un po' di tempo non sarà in grado di stare in compagnia. - Parlano anche di andare a Bath in primavera, e forse potrebbero rovesciarsi nel viaggio di ritorno, ed essere tutti costretti a letto per l'estate. (2)

Mercoledì. - Ho avuto per qualche giorno un'infreddatura e una debolezza a uno degli occhi, il che rende lo Scrivere né molto piacevole né molto proficuo, e probabilmente mi impedirà di finire io stessa questa lettera. - La Mamma si è impegnata a farlo per me, e lascerò a lei il Ballo di Kempshott. Hai espresso così poca preoccupazione per il rischio che ho corso di essere uccisa nel Bosco di Ash Park dal domestico di Mrs Hulbert, che ho una gran voglia di non raccontarti se lo sono stata o no, e dirò solo che non sono tornata a casa né quella sera né quella successiva, dato che Martha mi ha fatto gentilmente posto nel suo letto, che era quello chiuso nella nuova Stanza dei bambini. - La Bambinaia e il Bambino hanno dormito sul pavimento; e siamo stati tutti in un po' di confusione e in gran comodità; - il letto era anche troppo per noi, tutte e due sveglie a chiacchierare fino alle due, e a dormire per il resto della notte. - Voglio più che mai bene a Martha, e se posso ho intenzione di andarla a trovare, quando avrà una casa. - Giovedì abbiamo pranzato tutti dagli Harwood, e la compagnia si è sciolta la mattina dopo. - Questo disturbo all'occhio è stato duro da sopportare, perché da venerdì non sono stata in grado di leggere o lavorare in nessun modo, ma almeno un vantaggio ne trarrò, perché sarò diventata talmente esperta nella Musica quando mi sarò sbarazzata dell'infreddatura, che sarò perfettamente qualificata in quella Scienza almeno tanto da prendere il posto di Mr Roope questa estate a Eastwell; e sono certa della raccomandazione di Elizabeth, se non altro per via di Harriot. - Del mio Talento per il Disegno ho fornito delle prove nelle mie lettere a Te, e non ho nulla da fare, se non inventare nomi un po' più difficili per le Stelle. - Mary sta diventando gradatamente più ragionevole circa la bellezza del suo Bambino, e dice che non pensa sia davvero bello; ma sospetto che la sua moderazione sia un po' come quella della Mamma di W--- W---. (3) Forse Mary ti ha detto che stanno per cominciare a impegnarsi di più in inviti a Pranzo: i Bigg e Mr Holder domani pranzano lì e io andrò per incontrarli; dormirò lì. Catherine ha l'onore di dare il suo nome a un gruppo, (4) che sarà composto da due Wither, due Heathcote, una Blachford, e nessun Bigg salvo lei. Ieri sera si è congratulata con me per la promozione di Frank come se provasse davvero la Gioia di cui parlava. - Mio dolce piccolo George! Sono felice di sentire che ha un Talento così creativo per i Ritratti -. Ho ammirato molto il suo sigillo giallo, e spero che sceglierà il sigillo per la tua prossima lettera. - Ieri sera ho messo le scarpe Verdi, e ho portato con me il ventaglio bianco; sono molto contenta che lui non l'abbia buttato nel Fiume. - La donazione della Tenuta di Godmersham a Edward da parte di Mrs Knight non è stata dopo tutto un atto di Generosità così enorme come sembra, poiché lei si è riservata una rendita vitalizia; (5) - è necessario che si sappia, affinché la sua condotta non sia sovrastimata. - Penso piuttosto che tra i due sia stato Edward a dimostrare la maggiore Magnanimità, accettando la sua Rinuncia con un vincolo del genere. - Più scrivo, più l'occhio va meglio, perciò alla fine andrò avanti finché non starà del tutto bene, prima di cedere la penna alla mamma. - Il piccolo appartamento momentaneo di Mrs Bramston ieri sera era discretamente riempito da lei, Mrs H. Blackstone, le due figlie e me. - Le due Miss Blackstone non mi piacciono; certo, io sono stata sempre determinata a non farmele piacere, perciò il merito è minore. Mrs Bramston è stata molto educata, gentile e rumorosa. - Ho passato una serata molto piacevole, in particolare nel gruppo di Manydown -. C'era lo stesso genere di cena dell'Anno scorso, e la stessa penuria di sedie. - C'erano più Ballerini di quanti ne potesse comodamente contenere la sala, il che è abbastanza per costituire sempre un buon Ballo. - Non penso di essere stata molto richiesta -. Non erano molto propensi a rivolgersi a me fin quando non ne potevano fare a meno; - L'Importanza di qualcuno lo sai, varia di volta in volta senza nessun motivo particolare -. C'era un Signore, un ufficiale del Cheshire, un Giovanotto molto attraente, che mi avevano detto avrebbe voluto tanto conoscermi; ma dato che non lo voleva abbastanza da prendersi il disturbo di farlo, non se n'è fatto nulla. - Ho ballato di nuovo con Mr John Wood, due volte con un certo Mr South un giovanotto di Winchester che suppongo, sia lontanissimo dall'essere imparentato con il vescovo di quella Diocesi, (6) con G. Lefroy e J. Harwood, che mi pare si dedichi a me più di quanto fosse solito fare. - Una delle mie azioni più felici è stata quella di sedermi piuttosto che avere come Cavaliere il figlio maggiore di Lord Bolton, che balla troppo male per essere tollerato. - C'erano le signorine Charteris, e hanno recitato la parte delle signorine Eden con molto spirito. - Charles non è venuto! Che cattivo. Suppongo che non sia riuscito a farsi sostituire in tempo -. - Miss Debary ha rimpiazzato i tuoi due fogli da Disegno, con due di grandezza e qualità superiori; perciò ora non devo avercela con lei per averli presi. - Mr Ludlow e Miss Pugh di Andover si sono sposati da poco, e lo stesso Mrs Skeete di Basingstoke e Mr French, Farmacista di Reading. - Non mi meraviglio del tuo desiderio di rileggere first impressions, dato che l'hai scorso raramente, e tanto tempo fa. (7) - Ti sono molto obbligata per la tua intenzione di lasciarti alle spalle la mia vecchia sottoveste; è una cosa che ho a lungo desiderato in segreto, ma non avevo il coraggio di chiedere. Ti prego di menzionare il nome dell'innamorato di Maria Montresor quando scriverai di nuovo, la Mamma vuole saperlo, e io non ho voglia di riguardare le tue lettere per trovarlo. - Non sarò in grado di spedire questa lettera prima di domani, e venerdì resterai delusa; mi dispiace molto, ma non posso evitarlo. - La società tra Jeffereys Toomer e Legge è sciolta - gli ultimi due sono svaniti nel nulla, e si spera che Jeffereys si riprenda presto per il bene di qualche eroina il cui denaro è custodito da lui. - (8)

Ti auguro di goderti il tuo Compleanno per altre venti volte. (9) - Sarò in grado di spedire questa lettera con la posta di oggi, il che mi innalza alla vetta estrema dell'umana felicità, e mi fa crogiolare al sole del Benessere, o mi dà qualsiasi altra sensazione di piacere che preferisci nelle Lingue che conosci. - Non essere in collera con me per non aver riempito il Foglio (10) - e credimi la tua affezionata J. A.



(1) Un cappello di foggia orientale che era diventato di moda a seguito della campagna d'Egitto, in particolare dopo la vittoria di Nelson nella battaglia di Abukir (1-2 agosto 1798).

(2) Nel manoscritto "Bookham", "Theo" e "Baliol" sono cancellate, presumibilmente da Cassandra che evidentemente non voleva si capisse che JA stava parlando dei cugini Cooke. "Bookham" è "Great Bookham", il paese dove vivevano, "Theo" è Theophilus-Leigh Cooke, e "Baliol" è il Balliol College di Oxford, dove quest'ultimo studiava.

(3) Le Faye annota: "probabilmente un gioco su alcuni membri della famiglia Wither, visto che un loro discendente scrisse: 'Era abitudine della famiglia Wither agitarsi molto per problemi di salute e parlarne continuamente.'"

(4) Poche righe prima JA aveva parlato genericamente dei "Bigg" ma, in realtà, l'unica a portare solo questo nome era in effetti Catherine, in quanto il padre e il fratello avevano assunto il cognome Bigg-Wither (Wither era il cognome della nonna del padre) e la sorella era diventata Mrs Heathcote; Winifried Blachford era invece cugina dei Bigg/Bigg-Wither, in quanto figlia di un fratello della madre, Margaret Blachford, morta nel 1784.

(5) L'atto di donazione prevedeva una rendita vitalizia di duemila sterline l'anno a favore di Mrs Knight.

(6) Il vescovo di Winchester si chiamava North.

(7) "First Impression", scritto tra l'ottobre del 1796 e l'agosto del 1797, è il titolo della prima stesura di quello che sarà poi Pride and Prejudice.

(8) Società bancaria di Basingstoke tra Richard Jeffreys, Samuel Toomer e M. B. Legg, scioltasi il 1° gennaio 1799; Richard Jeffreys aveva annunciato di voler proseguire l'attività da solo.

(9) JA era molto precisa negli auguri di compleanno alla sorella; nel 1796 le scrive (lettera 1): "spero che tu sopravviva per altri ventitré anni."; qui, tre anni dopo, si limita a venti.

(10) Cassandra avrebbe pagato il prezzo pieno della lettera anche se l'ultima pagina conteneva poche righe.

18
(Monday 21 - Wednesday 23 January 1799) - no ms.
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Steventon: Monday January 21

My dear Cassandra

I will endeavour to make this letter more worthy your acceptance than my last, which was so shabby a one that I think Mr Marshall could never charge you with the postage. My eyes have been very indifferent since it was written, but are now getting better once more; keeping them so many hours open on Thursday night, as well as the dust of the ball-room, injured them a good deal. I use them as little as I can, but you know, and Elizabeth knows, and everybody who ever had weak eyes knows, how delightful it is to hurt them by employment, against the advice and entreaty of all one's friends. Charles leaves us to-night. The "Tamar" is in the Downs, and Mr Daysh advises him to join her there directly, as there is no chance of her going to the westward. Charles does not approve of this at all, and will not be much grieved if he should be too late for her before she sails, as he may then hope to get into a better station. He attempted to go to town last night, and got as far on his road thither as Dean Gate; but both the coaches were full, and we had the pleasure of seeing him back again. He will call on Daysh to-morrow to know whether the "Tamar" has sailed or not, and if she is still at the Downs he will proceed in one of the night coaches to Deal. I want to go with him, that I may explain the country to him properly between Canterbury and Rowling, but the unpleasantness of returning by myself deters me. I should like to go as far as Ospringe with him very much indeed, that I might surprise you at Godmersham. Martha writes me word that Charles was very much admired at Kintbury, and Mrs Lefroy never saw anyone so much improved in her life, and thinks him handsomer than Henry. He appears to far more advantage here than he did at Godmersham, not surrounded by strangers and neither oppressed by a pain in his face or powder in his hair. James christened Elizabeth Caroline on Saturday morning, and then came home. Mary, Anna, and Edward have left us of course; before the second went I took down her answer to her cousin Fanny. Yesterday came a letter to my mother from Edward Cooper to announce, not the birth of a child, but of a living; for Mrs Leigh has begged his acceptance of the Rectory of Hamstall-Ridware in Staffordshire, vacant by Mr Johnson's death. We collect from his letter that he means to reside there, in which he shows his wisdom. Staffordshire is a good way off; so we shall see nothing more of them till, some fifteen years hence, the Miss Coopers are presented to us, fine, jolly, handsome, ignorant girls. The living is valued at 140l. a year, but perhaps it may be improvable. How will they be able to convey the furniture of the dressing-room so far in safety? Our first cousins seem all dropping off very fast. One is incorporated into the family, another dies, and a third goes into Staffordshire. We can learn nothing of the disposal of the other living. I have not the smallest notion of Fulwar's having it. Lord Craven has probably other connections and more intimate ones, in that line, than he now has with the Kintbury family. Our ball on Thursday was a very poor one, only eight couple and but twenty three people in the room; but it was not the ball's fault, for we were deprived of two or three families by the sudden illness of Mr Wither, who was seized that morning at Winchester with a return of his former alarming complaint. An express was sent off from thence to the family; Catherine and Miss Blachford were dining with Mrs Russell. Poor Catherine's distress must have been very great. She was prevailed on to wait till the Heathcotes could come from Wintney, and then with those two and Harris proceeded directly to Winchester. In such a disorder his danger, I suppose, must always be great; but from this attack he is now rapidly recovering, and will be well enough to return to Manydown, I fancy, in a few days. It was a fine thing for conversation at the ball. But it deprived us not only of the Biggs, but of Mrs Russell too, and of the Boltons and John Harwood, who were dining there likewise, and of Mr Lane, who kept away as related to the family. Poor man! - I mean Mr Wither - his life is so useful, his character so respectable and worthy, that I really believe there was a good deal of sincerity in the general concern expressed on his account. Our ball was chiefly made up of Jervoises and Terrys, the former of whom were apt to be vulgar, the latter to be noisy. I had an odd set of partners: Mr Jenkins, Mr Street, Col Jervoise, James Digweed, J. Lyford, and Mr Briggs, a friend of the latter. I had a very pleasant evening, however, though you will probably find out that there was no particular reason for it; but I do not think it worth while to wait for enjoyment until there is some real opportunity for it. Mary behaved very well, and was not at all fidgetty. For the history of her adventures at the ball I refer you to Anna's letter. When you come home you will have some shirts to make up for Charles. Mrs Davies frightened him into buying a piece of Irish when we were in Basingstoke. Mr Daysh supposes that Captain Austen's commission has reached him by this time. Tuesday. - Your letter has pleased and amused me very much. Your essay on happy fortnights is highly ingenious, and the talobert skin made me laugh a good deal. Whenever I fall into misfortune, how many jokes it ought to furnish to my acquaintance in general, or I shall die dreadfully in their debt for entertainment. It began to occur to me before you mentioned it that I had been somewhat silent as to my mother's health for some time, but I thought you could have no difficulty in divining its exact state - you, who have guessed so much stranger things. She is tolerably well - better upon the whole than she was some weeks ago. She would tell you herself that she has a very dreadful cold in her head at present; but I have not much compassion for colds in the head without fever or sore throat. Our own particular little brother got a place in the coach last night, and is now, I suppose, in town. I have no objection at all to your buying our gowns there, as your imagination has pictured to you exactly such a one as is necessary to make me happy. You quite abash me by your progress in notting, for I am still without silk. You must get me some in town or in Canterbury; it should be finer than yours. I thought Edward would not approve of Charles being a crop, and rather wished you to conceal it from him at present, lest it might fall on his spirits and retard his recovery. My father furnishes him with a pig from Cheesedown; it is already killed and cut up, but it is not to weigh more than nine stone; the season is too far advanced to get him a larger one. My mother means to pay herself for the salt and the trouble of ordering it to be cured by the sparibs, the souse, and the lard. We have had one dead lamb. I congratulate you on Mr E. Hatton's good fortune. I suppose the marriage will now follow out of hand. Give my compliments to Miss Finch. What time in March may we expect your return in? I begin to be very tired of answering people's questions on that subject, and, independent of that, I shall be very glad to see you at home again, and then if we can get Martha and shirk ... who will be so happy as we? I think of going to Ibthorp in about a fortnight. My eyes are pretty well, I thank you, if you please. Wednesday, 23rd. - I wish my dear Fanny many returns of this day, and that she may on every return enjoy as much pleasure as she is now receiving from her doll's-beds. I have just heard from Charles, who is by this time at Deal. He is to be Second Lieutenant, which pleases him very well. The "Endymion" is come into the Downs, which pleases him likewise. He expects to be ordered to Sheerness shortly, as the "Tamar" has never been refitted. My father and mother made the same match for you last night, and are very much pleased with it. He is a beauty of my mother's.

Yours affectionately,
Jane

Miss Austen
Godmersham Park,
Faversham,
Kent

18
(lunedì 21 - mercoledì 23 gennaio 1799) - no ms.
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Steventon: lunedì 21 gennaio

Mia cara Cassandra

Farò il possibile per rendere questa lettera più degna della tua approvazione rispetto all'ultima, così trasandata che penso che Mr Marshall non ti avrebbe dovuto far pagare le spese postali. I miei occhi sono stati molto malandati da quando ho scritto, ma ora vanno di nuovo meglio; averli tenuti aperti così tante ore giovedì sera, così come la polvere della sala da ballo, li aveva molto affaticati. Li uso il meno possibile, ma tu sai, ed Elizabeth sa, e tutti quelli che hanno avuto debolezza agli occhi sanno, quant'è delizioso sfiancarli con il lavoro, andando contro i consigli e le suppliche dei propri amici. Charles ci lascia stasera. La "Tamar" è nelle Downs, (1) e Mr Daysh l'ha consigliato di raggiungerla direttamente là, in quanto non c'è la possibilità che si sposti verso ovest. Charles non è affatto d'accordo, e di certo non si dispererà se dovesse mancarla prima che salpi, visto che spera di salire a bordo in un posto più comodo. Ieri sera ha provato ad andare in città, ed era riuscito ad arrivare fino a Dean Gate; ma entrambe le carrozze erano piene, e abbiamo avuto il piacere di vederlo tornare indietro. Domani andrà da Daysh per sapere se la "Tamar" è salpata o no, e se è ancora nelle Downs proseguirà in una delle carrozze notturne per Deal. Vorrei andare con lui, poiché potrei fargli da guida tra Canterbury e Rowling, ma mi dissuade la seccatura di dover tornare da sola. Mi piacerebbe davvero andare con lui fino a Ospringe, perché potrei farvi una sorpresa a Godmersham. Martha mi scrive che Charles è stato molto ammirato a Kintbury, e che Mrs Lefroy non aveva mai visto in vita sua nessuno che fosse così tanto migliorato, e lo ritiene più bello di Henry. Qui appare nella sua luce migliore rispetto a Godmersham, non circondato da estranei né oppresso dal dover sempre sorridere e incipriarsi i capelli. Sabato mattina James ha battezzato Elizabeth Caroline, e poi è tornato a casa. Ovviamente Mary, Anna, ed Edward ci hanno lasciati; prima che la seconda se ne andasse ho buttato giù la sua risposta per la cugina Fanny. Ieri è arrivata una lettera per la mamma da Edward Cooper per annunciare, non la nascita di un figlio, ma di un beneficio ecclesiastico; perché Mrs Leigh l'ha pregato di accettare la Rettoria di Hamstall-Ridware nello Staffordshire, vacante per la morte di Mr Johnson. Dalla sua lettera abbiamo capito che intende stabilirsi là, la qual cosa dimostra la sua saggezza. Lo Staffordshire è piacevolmente lontano; così non vedremo più nessuno di loro finché, da qui a una quindicina di anni, non ci saranno presentate le signorine Cooper, ragazze raffinate, spumeggianti, belle e ignoranti. La rendita è valutata 140 sterline l'anno, ma forse potrà aumentare. Come faranno a far arrivare sani e salvi così lontano i mobili dello spogliatoio? I nostri cugini primi sembrano tutti scemare molto velocemente. Una è incorporata nella famiglia, un'altra muore, e il terzo va nello Staffordshire. (2) Non sappiamo nulla della situazione dell'altro beneficio. Non ho la più pallida idea se Fulwar l'abbia avuto. Lord Craven ha probabilmente altre e più strette relazioni di parentela, in quel ramo, di quante ne abbia ora con la famiglia di Kintbury. Il ballo di giovedì è stato molto esiguo, solo otto coppie e non più di ventitré persone in sala; ma non è stata colpa del ballo, perché sono mancate due o tre famiglie per l'improvvisa malattia di Mr Wither, che a Winchester quella mattina è stato colto da una ricaduta del preoccupante disturbo di cui aveva già sofferto. Da lì hanno mandato un espresso alla famiglia; Catherine e Miss Blachford stavano pranzando con Mrs Russell. L'angoscia della povera Catherine dev'essere stata molto forte. Fu persuasa ad aspettare che arrivassero gli Heathcote da Wintney, e poi con loro due e Harris hanno proseguito direttamente verso Winchester. Un problema simile, immagino, deve comportare un bel rischio; ma da questo attacco si è ripreso rapidamente, e presumo che sarà in grado di tornare a Manydown, fra qualche giorno. È stata una cosa fine di cui parlare al ballo. Ma ci ha privati non solo dei Bigg, ma anche di Mrs Russell, dei Bolton e di John Harwood, che era anche lui a pranzo là, e di Mr Lane, che non è venuto in quanto imparentato con la famiglia. Pover'uomo! - intendo Mr Wither - la sua vita è così utile, il carattere così rispettabile e degno di stima, che credo davvero ci fosse una buona dose di sincerità nell'interesse espresso in questa circostanza. Il ballo è stato tenuto su principalmente dai Jervoise e dai Terry, i primi dei quali erano inclini alla volgarità, i secondi al rumore. Ho avuto un bizzarro insieme di cavalieri: Mr Jenkins, Mr Street, il Col. Jervoise, James Digweed, J. Lyford, e Mr Briggs, un amico di quest'ultimo. È stata una serata piacevole, comunque, anche se tu probabilmente riterrai che non ci sia una ragione particolare per considerarla così; ma non penso che per divertirsi valga la pena di aspettare che si presenti un'occasione rilevante. Mary procede molto bene, e non è affatto ansiosa. Per il racconto delle sue avventure al ballo ti rimando alla lettera di Anna. Quando tornerai a casa avrai da fare qualche camicia per Charles. Mrs Davies l'ha costretto a comprare un pezzo di tela irlandese mentre eravamo a Basingstoke. Mr Daysh suppone che a questo punto la nomina del Capitano Austen gli sia arrivata. Martedì - La tua lettera è stata un piacere e un divertimento grandissimi. Il componimento sulle due settimane felici rivela un grande talento, e la pelle di talobert (3) mi ha fatto ridere a crepapelle. Ogni volta che mi troverò in difficoltà, dovrà essere fonte di molte battute per tutti i miei conoscenti, altrimenti sarà tremendo morire restando in debito di divertimento con loro. Comincia a venirmi in mente prima che sia tu a dirmelo che per un po' sono stata piuttosto silenziosa sulla salute della mamma, ma immaginavo che tu non avessi difficoltà a intuire con precisione il suo stato - tu, che hai presagito le cose più strane. Sta discretamente bene - tutto sommato meglio di qualche settimana fa. Ti avrà detto lei stessa che al momento soffre di un terribile raffreddore di testa; ma io non provo molta compassione per i raffreddori di testa senza febbre o mal di gola. Ieri sera il nostro speciale fratellino ha trovato posto sulla diligenza, e ora immagino che sarà in città. Non ho nessuna obiezione riguardo alla tua intenzione di comprare là i nostri vestiti, dato che la tua immaginazione ti avrà descritto esattamente quanto è necessario per rendermi contenta. Mi metti davvero in imbarazzo con i tuoi progressi nella rasatura, perché io sono ancora senza seta. Devi prendermene un po' in città o a Canterbury; dovrebbe essere più fine della tua. Ho pensato che Edward non approverebbe il fatto che Charles si è tagliato i capelli e non li incipria, e per il momento è meglio che tu glielo nasconda, affinché la cosa non lo abbatta e ritardi la sua guarigione. Il babbo gli ha procurato un maiale da Cheesedown; è già stato ammazzato e smembrato, ma non pesa più di sessanta chili; la stagione è troppo avanzata per procurargliene uno più grosso. La mamma intende pagare lei la salatura e prendersi il disturbo di far preparare le costolette, la salamoia, e il lardo. Ci è morto un agnello. Mi congratulo per la buona fortuna di Mr E. Hatton. Suppongo che ora il matrimonio seguirà a spron battuto. Fa' i miei complimenti a Miss Finch. In che periodo di marzo possiamo aspettarci il tuo ritorno? Comincio a essere stufa della gente che chiede notizie su questo argomento, e, indipendentemente da questo, sarò molto contenta di rivederti a casa, e poi se possiamo avere Martha ed evitare [...] (4) chi sarà più felice di noi? Penso di andare a Ibthorp nel giro di un paio di settimane. Gli occhi stanno abbastanza bene, ti ringrazio, se non ti dispiace. Mercoledì, 23 - Vorrei molti giorni come questo per la mia cara Fanny, e che possa ogni volta provare lo stesso piacere che ora le hanno procurato i lettini per la bambola. Ho appena avuto notizie da Charles, che è a Deal. Sta per diventare Sottotenente, il che gli fa molto piacere. L'"Endimione" è entrata nelle Downs, cosa che gli fa altrettanto piacere. Si aspetta di essere assegnato a breve a Sheerness, visto che la "Tamar" non è mai stata rinnovata. Il babbo e la mamma ti hanno scritto la stessa cosa ieri sera, e ne sono molto compiaciuti. Lui è il cocco della mamma.

Con affetto, tua
Jane



(1) La zona di mare tra le "Goodwin Sands" nella parte orientale della costa del Kent.

(2) La prima è Eliza Hancock (de Feuillide), che si era sposata il 31 dicembre 1797 con Henry Austen; la seconda è Jane Cooper (Lady Williams), morta in un incidente di viaggio il 9 agosto 1798, sorella del terzo, l'Edward Cooper di cui sta parlando JA.

(3) Le Faye annota: "Può essere un gioco di parole familiare o una lettura errata di 'rabbit skin' ('pelle di coniglio')." Il testo della lettera è stato trascritto da Lord Brabourne nella sua edizione delle lettere di JA e, da allora, il manoscritto è perduto.

(4) Non si sa se la parte omessa sia stata tagliata da Lord Brabourne o, in precedenza, da Cassandra.

19
(Friday 17 May 1799)
Cassandra Austen, Steventon


No. 13 - Queen's Square - Friday May 17.th

May dearest Cassandra,

Our Journey yesterday went off exceedingly well; nothing occurred to alarm or delay us; - We found the roads in excellent order, had very good horses all the way, & reached Devizes with ease by 4 o'clock. - I suppose John has told you in what manner we were divided when we left Andover, & no alteration was afterwards made. At Devizes we had comfortable rooms, & a good dinner, to which we sat down about 5; amongst other things we had Asparagus & a Lobster which made me wish for you, & some cheesecakes, on which the children made so delightful a supper as to endear the Town of Devizes to them for a long time. Well, here we are at Bath; we got here about one o'clock, & have been arrived just long enough to go over the house, fix on our rooms, & be very well pleased with the whole of it. Poor Eliz: has had a dismal ride of it from Devizes, for it has rained almost all the way, & our first veiw of Bath has been just as gloomy as it was last November twelvemonth. I have got so many things to say, so many things equally unimportant, that I know not on which to decide at present, & shall therefore go & eat with the Children. - We stopt in Paragon as we came along, but as it was too wet & dirty for us to get out, we could only see Frank, who told us that his Master was very indifferent, but had had a better night last night than usual. In Paragon we met Mrs Foley & Mrs Dowdeswell with her yellow shawl airing out - & at the bottom of Kingsdown Hill we met a Gentleman in a Buggy, who on minute examination turned out to be Dr Hall - and Dr Hall in such very deep mourning that either his Mother, his Wife, or himself must be dead. These are all of our acquaintance who have yet met our eyes. - I have some hopes of being plagued about my Trunk; - I had more a few hours ago, for it was too heavy to go by the Coach which brought Thomas & Rebecca from Devizes, there was reason to suppose that it might be too heavy likewise for any other Coach, & for a long time we could hear of no Waggon to convey it. - At last however, we unluckily discovered that one was just on the point of setting out for this place - but, at any rate, the Trunk cannot be here till tomorrow - so far we are safe - & who knows what may not happen to procure a farther delay. - I put Mary's letter into the Post-office at Andover with my own hand. - We are exceedingly pleased with the House; the rooms are quite as large as we expected, Mrs Bromley is a fat woman in mourning, & a little black kitten runs about the Staircase. - Eliz: has the apartment within the Drawing room; she wanted my Mother to have it, but as there was no bed in the inner one, & the stairs are so much easier of ascent or my Mother so much stronger than in Paragon as not to regard the double flight, it is settled for us to be above; where we have two very nice-sized rooms, with dirty Quilts & everything comfortable. I have the outward & larger apartment, as I ought to have; which is quite as large as our bed room at home, & my Mother's is not materially less. - The Beds are both as large as any at Steventon, & I have a very nice chest of Drawers & a Closet full of shelves - so full indeed that there is nothing else in it, & should therefore be called a Cupboard rather than a Closet, I suppose. Tell Mary that there were some Carpenters at work in the Inn at Devizes this morning, but as I could not be sure of their being Mrs W. Fowle's relations, I did not make myself known to them. I hope it will be a tolerable afternoon; when first we came, all the Umbrellas were up, but now the Pavements are getting very white again. - My Mother does not seem at all the worse for her Journey, nor are any of us I hope, tho' Edw:d seemed rather fagged last night, & not very brisk this morning, but I trust the bustle of sending for Tea, Coffee, & Sugar &c., & going out to taste a cheese himself will do him good. - There was a very long list of Arrivals here, in the Newspaper yesterday, so that we need not immediately dread absolute Solitude - & there is a public Breakfast in Sydney Gardens every morning, so that we shall not be wholly starved. - Eliz: has just had a very good account of the three little Boys -. I hope you are very busy & very comfortable -. I find no difficulty in doing my Eyes. - I like our situation very much - it is far more chearful than Paragon, & the prospect from the Drawingroom window at which I now write, is rather picturesque, as it commands a perspective veiw of the left side of Brock Street, broken by three Lombardy Poplars in the Garden of the last house in Queen's Parade. -

I am rather impatient to know the fate of my best gown, but I suppose it will be some days before Frances can get through the Trunk - In the mean time I am with many thanks for your trouble in making it, as well as marking my Silk Stockings, Yrs very affec:ly

Jane

A great deal of Love from everybody.

Miss Austen,
Steventon,
Overton,
Hants

19
(venerdì 17 maggio 1799)
Cassandra Austen, Steventon


N. 13 - Queen's Square - venerdì 17 maggio

Mia carissima Cassandra,

Ieri il Viaggio è andato straordinariamente bene; non è capitato nulla che ci potesse preoccupare o farci tardare; - Abbiamo trovato le strade in uno stato eccellente, abbiamo avuto cavalli ottimi per tutto il tragitto, e abbiamo raggiunto Devizes senza problemi alle 4. - Immagino che John (1) ti abbia detto in che modo ci siamo divisi quando siamo partiti da Andover, e dopo non è stato fatto nessun cambiamento. A Devizes abbiamo avuto stanze confortevoli, e un buon pranzo, che abbiamo cominciato verso le 5; tra le altre cose c'erano Asparagi e un'Aragosta che mi ha fatto desiderare di averti con noi, e delle fette di cheesecake, con cui i bambini hanno pranzato con tale piacere da far loro amare per molto tempo la Città di Devizes. Be', eccoci a Bath; siamo arrivati verso l'una, giusto in tempo per fare un giro della casa, scegliere le stanze, ed essere completamente soddisfatti di tutto l'insieme. La povera Elizabeth era depressa nel viaggio da Devizes, perché ha piovuto per quasi tutto il tragitto, e la nostra prima immagine di Bath è stata tetra come a novembre di due anni fa. Ho così tante cose da dire, così tante ugualmente irrilevanti, che al momento non so su quale soffermarmi, e perciò andrò a mangiare con i Bambini. - Ci siamo fermati al Paragon mentre venivamo, ma dato che era troppo umido e fangoso per scendere, abbiamo potuto vedere solo Frank, (2) che ci ha detto che il suo Padrone era molto indisposto, ma la nottata precedente era stata migliore del solito. Al Paragon abbiamo incontrato Mrs Foley e Mrs Dowdeswell con il suo scialle giallo svolazzante - e in fondo a Kingsdown Hill abbiamo incontrato un Signore in Calesse, che a un minuzioso esame è risultato essere il Dr. Hall - e un Dr. Hall in lutto così stretto che sua Madre, sua Moglie, o lui stesso devono essere morti. Queste sono tutte le nostre conoscenze che ci sono capitate a portata di sguardo. - Ho qualche speranza di essere tormentata dal mio Baule; - Ne avevo di più qualche ora fa, perché era troppo pesante per essere caricato sulla Carrozza che portava Thomas e Rebecca da Devizes, c'era motivo di supporre che sarebbe stato ugualmente troppo pesante per qualsiasi altra Carrozza, e per un bel po' non siamo riusciti a individuare nessun Carro in grado di trasportarlo. - Alla fine comunque, abbiamo avuto la sfortuna di scoprire che ce n'era uno proprio sul punto di partire per venire qua - ma, in ogni caso, Il Baule non arriverà fino a domani - fino a quel momento siamo salvi - e chissà cosa potrebbe accadere per procurare un ulteriore ritardo. - Ho portato con le mie mani la lettera di Mary all'Ufficio postale di Andover. - Siamo estremamente soddisfatti della Casa; le stanze sono grandi proprio come ce le aspettavamo, Mrs Bromley è una grassa signora in lutto, e un micetto nero corre per le Scale. Elizabeth ha la camera che dà sul Soggiorno; voleva darla alla Mamma, ma dato che nella camera interna non c'era il letto, e le scale sono molto agevoli da salire o la Mamma è molto più in forze che al Paragon tanto da non far caso alla doppia rampa, ci siamo sistemate di sopra; dove abbiamo due stanze ben messe, con le Trapunte sporche e tutte le comodità. Io ho la camera esterna e più grande, com'era giusto che fosse, che è grande esattamente come la nostra camera da letto a casa, e la Mamma in sostanza non sta peggio. - I Letti sono entrambi grandi come quelli di Steventon, e io ho un Cassettone molto grazioso e uno Stanzino pieno di scaffali - così pieno in effetti che non c'entra nient'altro, e perciò suppongo che dovrebbe chiamarsi un Armadio più che uno Stanzino. Di' a Mary che stamattina nella Locanda a Devizes c'erano dei Falegnami al lavoro, ma dato che non potevo essere certa che fossero i parenti di Mrs Fowle, non mi sono fatta riconoscere. (3) Spero che ci sarà un pomeriggio passabile; quando siamo arrivati, gli Ombrelli erano tutti aperti, ma adesso i Marciapiedi stanno ridiventando bianchissimi. - La Mamma non sembra affatto aver risentito del Viaggio, e spero nemmeno nessuno di noi, anche se Edward sembrava piuttosto affaticato ieri sera, e non molto vivace stamattina, ma credo che il darsi da fare per ordinare Tè, Caffè e Zucchero ecc, e l'uscire per assaggiare personalmente il formaggio gli farà bene. - C'era una lunga lista di Arrivi, nel Giornale di ieri, cosicché non dovremo temere nell'immediato un'assoluta Solitudine - e ogni mattina c'è una Prima colazione pubblica nei Sydney Gardens, cosicché non moriremo certo di fame. - Elizabeth ha appena ricevuto ottime notizie sui tre Ragazzini -. (4) Spero che tu sia indaffarata e perfettamente a tuo agio -. Non ho nessuna difficoltà agli Occhi - La nostra posizione mi piace moltissimo - è molto più allegra che al Paragon, e la vista dalla finestra del Soggiorno dove ora sto scrivendo, è abbastanza amena, dato che dà su uno scorcio del lato sinistro di Brock Street, interrotto da tre Pioppi Lombardi nel Giardino dell'ultima casa di Queen's Parade.

Sono piuttosto impaziente di conoscere il destino del mio abito migliore, ma suppongo che ci vorranno alcuni giorni prima che Frances possa mettere mano al Baule - Nel frattempo sono con molti ringraziamenti per il fastidio che ti sei presa a farlo, così come a mettere le cifre alle mie Calze di Seta, con tanto affetto, la Tua

Jane

Tanti saluti affettuosi da tutti.



(1) John Littleworth, cocchiere di James Austen, che aveva accompagnato il gruppo (JA con la madre, il fratello Edward con la moglie Elizabeth e i due figli più grandi: Fanny ed Edward) fino ad Andover, prima tappa del viaggio verso Bath.

(2) Un domestico dei Leigh-Perrot, zii di JA, che avevano affittato una casa al n. 1 di "The Paragon", un complesso di case palladiane di Bath.

(3) Un gioco di parole: "carpenter" significa "falegname", ma era anche il cognome da ragazza della moglie di William Fowle.

(4) I tre figli più piccoli di Edward ed Elizabeth Austen (George, Henry e William) erano rimasti a Godmersham.

20
(Sunday 2 June 1799)
Cassandra Austen, Steventon


13, Queen Square - Sunday June 2.d

My dear Cassandra

I am obliged to you for two letters, one from Yourself & the other from Mary, for of the latter I knew nothing till on the receipt of Yours yesterday, when the Pigeon Basket was examined & I received my due. - As I have written to her since the time which ought to have brought me her's, I suppose she will consider herself as I chuse to consider her, still in my debt. - I will lay out all the little Judgement I have in endeavouring to get such stockings for Anna as she will approve; - but I do not know that I shall execute Martha's commission at all, for I am not fond of ordering shoes, & at any rate they shall all have flat heels. - What must I tell you of Edward? - Truth or Falsehood? - I will try the former, & you may chuse for yourself another time. - He was better yesterday than he had been for two or three days before, about as well as while he was at Steventon - He drinks at the Hetling Pump, is to bathe tomorrow, & try Electricity on Tuesday; - he proposed the latter himself to Dr Fellowes, who made no objection to it, but I fancy we are all unanimous in expecting no advantage from it. At present I have no great notion of our staying here beyond the Month. - I heard from Charles last week; - they were to sail on Wednesday. - My Mother seems remarkably well. - My Uncle overwalked himself at first and & now only travel in a Chair, but is otherwise very well. - My Cloak is come home, & here follows the pattern of its' lace. - If you do not think it wide enough, I can give 3d a yard more for yours, & not go beyond the two Guineas, for my Cloak altogether does not cost quite two pounds. - I like it very much, & can now exclaim with delight, like J. Bond at Hay-Harvest, "This is what I have been looking for these three years." - I saw some Gauzes in a shop in Bath Street yesterday at only 4s a yard, but they were not so good or so pretty as mine. - Flowers are very much worn, & Fruit is still more the thing. - Eliz: has a bunch of Strawberries, & I have seen Grapes, Cherries, Plumbs & Apricots - There are likewise Almonds & raisins, french plumbs & Tamarinds at the Grocers, but I have never seen any of them in hats. - A plumb or green gage would cost three shillings; - Cherries & Grapes about 5 I believe - but this is at some of the dearest Shops; - My Aunt has told me of a very cheap one near Walcot Church, to which I shall go in quest of something for You. - I have never seen an old Woman at the Pump room. - Eliz: has given me a hat, and it is not only a pretty hat, but a pretty stile of hat too - It is something like Eliza's - only instead of being all straw, half of it is narrow purple ribbon. - I flatter myself however that you can understand very little of it, from this description -. Heaven forbid that I should ever offer such encouragement to Explanations, as to give a clear one on any occasion myself. - But I must write no more of ... [six or seven lines cut out] ... it so. - I spent friday evening with the Mapletons, & was obliged to submit to being pleased inspite of my inclination. We took a very charming walk from 6 to 8 up Beacon Hill, & across some fields to the Village of Charlcombe, which is sweetly situated in a little green Valley, as a Village with such a name ought to be. - Marianne is sensible & intelligent, and even Jane considering how fair she is, is not unpleasant. We had a Miss North & a Mr Gould of our party; - the latter walked home with me after Tea; - he is a very Young Man, just entered of Oxford, wears Spectacles, & has heard that Evelina was written by Dr Johnson. - I am afraid I cannot undertake to carry Martha's Shoes home, for tho' we had plenty of room in our Trunks when we came, We shall have many more things to take back, & I must allow besides for my packing. - There is to be a grand gala on tuesday evening in Sydney Gardens; - a Concert, with Illuminations & fireworks; - to the latter Eliz: & I look forward with pleasure, & even the Concert will have more than its' usual charm with me, as the Gardens are large enough for me to get pretty well beyond the reach of its sound. - In the morning Lady Willoughby is to present the Colours to some Corps of Yeomanry or other, in the Crescent - & that such festivities may have a proper commencement, we think of going to ... [six or seven lines cut off] ... I am quite pleased with Martha & Mrs. Lefroy for wanting the pattern of our Caps, but I am not so well pleased with your giving it to them -. Some wish, some prevailing Wish is necessary to the animation of everybody's Mind, & in gratifying this, You leave them to form some other which will not probably be half so innocent. - I shall not forget to write to Frank. - Duty & Love &c.

Yours affec:ly Jane

My Uncle is quite surprised at my hearing from you so often - but as long as we can keep the frequency of our correspondence from Martha's Uncle, we will not fear our own. -

Miss Austen
Steventon
Overton
Hants

20
(domenica 2 giugno 1799)
Cassandra Austen, Steventon


13, Queen Square - domenica 2 giugno

Mia cara Cassandra

Sono in obbligo con te per due lettere, una Tua e l'altra di Mary, perché di quest'ultima non sapevo nulla finché ieri non ho ricevuto la Tua, quando è stato esaminato il Cesto dei Piccioni e ho ricevuto quanto mi spettava. - Dato che le avevo scritto quando sarebbe dovuta arrivarmi una sua lettera, suppongo che lei si considererà come ho ritenuto di considerarla io, ancora in debito con me. - Ho impiegato tutto il mio scarso Giudizio nel tentativo di prendere ad Anna delle calze di suo gradimento; - ma non so affatto se eseguirò la commissione di Martha, perché non amo ordinare le scarpe, e a ogni modo avranno tutte il tacco basso. - Che devo dirti di Edward? - Verità o Bugia? - Proverò con la prima, e un'altra volta potrai scegliere tu. - Ieri stava meglio di come era stato per i due o tre giorni precedenti, più o meno come stava a Steventon - beve alla Hetling Pump, domani andrà ai bagni, e martedì proverà l'Elettricità; - quest'ultima l'ha proposta lui stesso al Dr Fellowes, che non ha fatto obiezioni, ma immagino che saremo tutti unanimi nel non aspettarcene molto. Al momento non sono molto propensa a restare qui per più di un Mese. - La settimana scorsa ho avuto notizie da Charles; - sarebbero salpati mercoledì. - La Mamma sembra che stia notevolmente bene. - Lo Zio dapprima ha esagerato nel camminare e ora viaggia solo in Poltrona, ma per il resto sta molto bene. - La mia Mantella è arrivata, e qui sotto c'è il disegno del merletto. - Se pensi che non sia abbastanza ampio, posso spendere 3 scellini in più a iarda per uno come il tuo, e non superare le due Ghinee, visto che tutto sommato la mia Mantella non arriva a costare due sterline. - Mi piace moltissimo, e ora posso esclamare con gioia, come J. Bond nella stagione della mietitura, "È quello che avevo cercato in questi tre anni." - Ieri ho visto della Mussolina in un negozio di Bath Street a soli 4 scellini a iarda, ma non era buona o graziosa come la mia. - I Fiori si portano moltissimo, e la Frutta è ancora all'ultima moda. - Elizabeth ha un grappolo di Fragole, e io ho visto Uva, Ciliege, Prugne e Albicocche - Ci sono Mandorle e uva passa, prugne francesi e Tamarindi come in Drogheria, ma non ne ho mai vista nessuna nei cappelli. Una prugna o una susina verde costano tre scellini; - Ciliege e Uva credo all'incirca 5 - ma sono i prezzi dei Negozi più cari; - La Zia me ne ha indicato uno più a buon mercato vicino a Walcot Church, dove andrò a cercare qualcosa per Te. - Non ho più visto una Donna anziana alla Pump room. - Elizabeth mi ha dato un cappello, e non è soltanto un cappello grazioso, ma anche un genere grazioso di cappello - È un po' come quello di Eliza - solo che invece di essere tutto di paglia, per metà ha un nastrino color porpora. - Comunque mi compiaccio del fatto che, da questa descrizione, capirai ben poco di come è fatto -. Dio non voglia che io possa mai offrire un incoraggiamento simile alle Spiegazioni, come fornirne una comprensibile in una qualsiasi occasione. - Ma devo scrivere non più di [sei o sette righe tagliate] così. - Ho passato la serata di venerdì con i Mapleton, e sono stata obbligata a rassegnarmi a essere piacevole a dispetto delle mie inclinazioni. Abbiamo fatto una bella passeggiata dalle 6 alle 8 su Beacon Hill, e nella campagna intorno al Villaggio di Charlcombe, che ha una bella posizione in una piccola Valle verde, come dev'essere per un Villaggio con un nome del genere. (1) - Marianne è sensibile e intelligente, e anche Jane considerando quant'è bella, non è male. Nel gruppo c'era una certa Miss North e un certo Mr Gould; - quest'ultimo mi ha accompagnata a casa dopo il Tè; - è molto giovane, appena entrato a Oxford, porta gli Occhiali, e ha sentito che Evelina è stata scritta dal Dr. Johnson. (2) - Temo di non potermi impegnare a portare a casa le scarpe di Martha, perché anche se quando siamo arrivati avevamo molto spazio nei Bauli, avremo molte più cose da riportare, e devo lasciare spazio per i miei pacchetti. - Martedì sera ci sarà un gran gala nei Sydney Gardens; - un Concerto, con Luminarie e fuochi d'artificio; - questi ultimi Elizabeth e io li aspettiamo con piacere, e anche il Concerto avrà per me più del solito fascino, visto che i Giardini sono abbastanza estesi per consentirmi abbastanza agevolmente di starne lontana. - In mattinata Lady Willoughby presenterà le Insegne a un qualche Corpo della Guardia Nazionale o altro, al Crescent - e affinché questi festeggiamenti possano avere un inizio appropriato, pensiamo di andare a [sei o sette righe tagliate] Mi fa molto piacere che Martha e Mrs Lefroy abbiano bisogno del modello dei nostri Cappelli, ma non mi fa altrettanto piacere che tu glielo dia -. Qualche desiderio, qualche Desiderio predominante è necessario per dare vivacità all'Animo di ciascuno, e nel soddisfarlo, permetti loro di crearsene qualche altro che probabilmente non sarà così innocente. - Non dimenticherò di scrivere a Frank. - Ossequi e Baci ecc.

Con affetto, tua Jane

Lo Zio è molto sorpreso dal fatto che io riceva così spesso tue notizie - ma sempre che si riesca a nascondere la frequenza della nostra corrispondenza allo Zio di Martha, non dovremo temere nulla. -



(1) "Combe" significa "valletta, valle molto stretta".

(2) Evelina, or a Young Lady's Entrance into the World, è un romanzo di Fanny Burney.

La pagina con il disegno del merletto.
(dal sito The Morgan Library & Museum)

  1-10      |     indice lettere     |     home page     |      21-30