Jane Austen

Lettere 51-60
traduzione di Giuseppe Ierolli

  41-50      |     indice lettere     |     home page     |      61-70 

51
(Friday 20-Sunday 22 February 1807)
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Southampton Friday Feby 20th.

My dear Cassandra

We have at last heard something of Mr Austen's Will. It is beleived at Tunbridge that he has left everything after the death of his widow to Mr My Austen's 3d son John; & as the said John was the only one of the Family who attended the Funeral, it seems likely to be true. - Such ill-gotten Wealth can never prosper! - I really have very little to say this week, & do not feel as if I should spread that little into the shew of much. I am inclined for short sentences. - Mary will be obliged to you to take notice how often Elizth nurses her Baby in the course of the 24 hours, how often it is fed & with what; - you need not trouble yourself to write the result of your observations, your return will be early enough for the communication of them. - You are recommended to bring away some flower-seeds from Godmersham, particularly Mignionette seed. - My Mother has heard this morng from Paragon. - My Aunt talks much of the violent colds prevailing in Bath, from which my Uncle has suffered ever since their return, & she has herself a cough much worse than any she ever had before, subject as she has always been to bad ones. - She writes in good humour & chearful spirits however. The negociation between them & Adlestrop so happily over indeed, what can have power to vex her materially? -Elliston, she tells us has just succeeded to a considerable fortune on the death of an Uncle. I would not have it enough to take him from the Stage; she should quit her business, & live with him in London. - We could not pay our visit on Monday, the weather altered just too soon; & we have since had a touch of almost everything in the weather way; - two of the severest frosts since the winter began, preceded by rain, hail & snow. - Now we are smiling again.

Saturday. I have received your letter, but I suppose you do not expect me to be gratified by it's contents. I confess myself much disappointed by this repeated delay of your return, for tho' I had pretty well given up all idea of your being with us before our removal, I felt sure that March would not pass quite away without bringing you. Before April comes, of course something else will occur to detain you. But as you are happy, all this is Selfishness, of which here is enough for one page. - Pray tell Lizzy that if I had imagined her Teeth to be really out, I should have said before what I say now, that it was a very unlucky fall indeed, that I am afraid it must have given her a great deal of pain, & that I dare say her Mouth looks very comical. - I am obliged to Fanny for the list of Mrs Coleman's Children, whose names I had not however quite forgot; the new one I am sure will be Caroline. - I have got Mr Bowen's Recipe for you, it came in my Aunt's letter. - You must have had more snow at Gm, than we had here; - on Wednesday morng there was a thin covering of it over the fields & roofs of the Houses, but I do not think there was any left the next day. Everybody used to Southampton says that Snow never lies more than 24 hours near it, & from what we have observed ourselves, it is very true. - Frank's going into Kent depends of course upon his being unemployed, but as the 1st Lord after promising Ld Moira that Capt. A. should have the first good Frigate that was vacant, has since given away two or three fine ones, he has no particular reason to expect an appointment now. - He however has scarcely spoken about the Kentish Journey; I have my information cheifly from her, & she considers her own going thither as more certain if he shd be at sea, than if not. - Frank has got a very bad Cough, for an Austen; - but it does not disable him from making very nice fringe for the Drawingroom-Curtains. - Mrs Day has now got the Carpet in hand, & Monday I hope will be the last day of her employment here. A fortnight afterwards she is to be called again from the shades of her red-check'd bed in an alley near the end of the High Street to clean the new House & air the Bedding. - We hear that we are envied our House by many people, & that the Garden is the best in the Town. - There will be green baize enough for Martha's room & ours; - not to cover them, but to lie over the part where it is most wanted, under the Dressing Table. Mary is to have a peice of Carpetting for the same purpose; my Mother says she does not want any; - & it may certainly be better done without in her room than in Martha's & ours, from the difference of their aspect. - I recommend Mrs Grant's Letters, as a present to the latter; - what they are about, nor how many volumes they form I do not know, having never heard of them but from Miss Irvine, who speaks of them as a new & much admired work, & as one which has pleased her highly. - I have enquired for the book here, but find it quite unknown. I beleive I put five breadths of Linen also into my flounce; I know I found it wanted more than I had expected, & that I shd have been distressed if I had not bought more than I beleived myself to need, for the sake of the even Measure, on which we think so differently. - A light morng gown will be a very necessary purchase for you, & I wish you a pretty one. I shall buy such things whenever I am tempted, but as yet there is nothing of the sort to be seen. - We are reading Barretti's other book, & find him dreadfully abusive of poor Mr Sharpe. I can no longer take his part against you, as I did nine years ago. - Sunday - This post has brought me Martha's own assurance of her coming on tuesday eveng which nothing is now to prevent except William should send her word that there is no remedy on that day. - Her letter was put into the post at Basingstoke on their return from Eversley, where she says they have spent their time very pleasantly; she does not own herself in any danger of being tempted back again however, & as she signs by her maiden name we are at least to suppose her not married yet. - They must have had a cold visit, but as she found it agreable I suppose there was no want of Blankets, and we may trust to her Sister's taking care that her love of many should be know. - She sends me no particulars, having time only to write the needful. -

I wish You a pleasant party tomorrow & not more than you like of Miss Hatton's neck. - Lady B. must have been a shameless woman if she named H. Hales as within her Husband's reach. It is a peice of impertinence indeed in a Woman to pretend to fix on anyone, as if she supposed it cd be only ask & have. - A Widower with 3 children has no right to look higher than his daughter's Governess. - I am forced to be abusive for want of subject, having really nothing to say. - When Martha comes she will supply me with matter; I shall have to tell you how she likes the House & what she thinks of Mary. - You must be very cold today at Gm - We are cold here. I expect a severe March, a wet April, & a sharp May. - And with this prophecy I must conclude. -

My Love to everybody - Yrs affectely J Austen

Miss Austen
Godmersham Park
Faversham
Kent

51
(venerdì 20-domenica 22 febbraio 1807)
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Southampton venerdì 20 feb.

Mia cara Cassandra

Finalmente abbiamo saputo qualcosa del Testamento di Mr Austen. A Tunbridge si dice che dopo la morte della sua vedova vada tutto a John, il 3° figlio di Mr Motley Austen; e siccome il suddetto John è stato l'unico della Famiglia a presenziare al Funerale, sembra probabile che sia vero. - Una Ricchezza così mal acquisita non produrrà mai qualcosa di buono! - Ho davvero molto poco da dire questa settimana, e quel poco non mi va di farlo diventare tanto. Sono propensa a frasi brevi. - Mary ti sarà molto obbligata se le fornirai notizie su quante volte Elizabeth si prende cura della Bimba nel corso delle 24 ore, quante volte prepara la poppata e con che cosa; - non è necessario che tu ti prenda il disturbo di scrivere il risultato delle tue indagini, il tuo ritorno avverrà presto abbastanza per comunicarlo a voce. - Ti raccomando di portare dei semi di fiori da Godmersham, in particolare semi di Reseda. - Stamattina la Mamma ha avuto notizie da Paragon. - La Zia parla molto del freddo violento che imperversa a Bath, per il quale lo Zio ha sofferto da quando sono tornati là, e lei stessa ha una tosse molto più forte di quante ne abbia mai avute prima, pur essendo stata sempre soggetta alle peggiori. - Tuttavia da quello che scrive sembra di buon umore e allegra. D'altronde la felice conclusione dell'accordo tra loro e Adlestrop, come potrebbe incidere sulle loro sostanze? (1) - Dice che Elliston ha appena ereditato una fortuna considerevole a causa della morte di uno Zio. Non vorrei fosse abbastanza da far lasciare a lui le scene; lei dovrebbe abbandonare il suo lavoro, e vivere con lui a Londra. - Potremmo non fare la nostra visita lunedì, il tempo è cambiato improvvisamente; e abbiamo sperimentato un frammento di quasi tutti i tipi di clima; - due gelate molto forti da quando è iniziato l'inverno, precedute da pioggia, grandine e neve. - Ora è tornato il sorriso.

Sabato Ho ricevuto la tua lettera, ma immagino che non ti aspetti che io sia gratificata dal contenuto. Ammetto di essere molto delusa da questo ennesimo ritardo nel tuo ritorno, perché anche se avevo quasi del tutto abbandonato l'idea di averti qui prima del nostro trasferimento, mi sentivo sicura che marzo non sarebbe passato completamente senza riportarti da noi. Prima dell'arrivo di aprile, accadrà di sicuro qualcosa che ti tratterrà. Ma visto che tu sei contenta, si tratta solo di Egoismo, del quale ho riempito abbastanza la pagina. - Ti prego di dire a Lizzy che se avessi immaginato che aveva davvero perso il Dente, avrei detto prima quello che dico adesso, ovvero che è stata una caduta molto nefasta, che temo debba averle procurato un sacco di dolore, e che mi azzardo a dire che la sua Bocca debba sembrare molto comica. - Sono in debito con Fanny per l'elenco dei Figli di Mrs Coleman, i cui nomi tuttavia non avevo completamente dimenticato; sono certa che la nuova si chiamerà Caroline. (2) - Ho avuto la ricetta di Mr Bowen per te, era nella lettera della Zia. - A Godmersham ci dev'essere stata più neve, che qui da noi; - mercoledì mattina ce n'era uno strato sottile sui campi e sui tetti delle Case, ma non credo che il giorno dopo ce ne fosse ancora. Tutti gli esperti di Southampton dicono che la Neve qui non attacca per più di 24 ore, e da quello che abbiamo potuto vedere, è proprio vero. - Il viaggio di Frank nel Kent dipenderà naturalmente dal fatto che non gli affidino un incarico, ma dato che il 1° Lord dopo aver promesso a Lord Moira che il Cap. A. avrebbe avuto la prima buona Fregata disponibile, ne ha distribuite due o tre delle migliori, non c'è nessun motivo particolare per aspettarsi una nomina in questo periodo. - Lui comunque non ha quasi fatto parola del Viaggio nel Kent; le mie informazioni provengono principalmente da lei, che ritiene il proprio viaggio là più certo se lui dovesse essere in mare, piuttosto che se non fosse così. - Frank si è preso una Tosse molto brutta, per essere un Austen; - ma la cosa non gli ha impedito di fare delle frange molto graziose per le Tende del Salotto. - Mrs Day ha messo mano al Tappeto, e lunedì spero che sarà il suo ultimo giorno di lavoro qui. Un paio di settimane dopo la richiameremo dalle ombre del suo letto a scacchi rossi in un vicoletto vicino alla fine di High Street per pulire la Casa nuova e arieggiare la biancheria. - Siamo venuti a sapere di essere invidiati da molti per la nostra Casa, e che il Giardino è il migliore della Città. - Ci sarà abbastanza panno verde per la stanza di Martha e per la nostra; - non per ricoprirle, ma per poggiarlo sopra alle parti che ne hanno più bisogno, sotto la Toletta. Mary si procurerà allo stesso scopo un pezzo di Moquette; la Mamma dice che lei non vuole niente; - e se ne può di sicuro fare più facilmente a meno nella sua stanza piuttosto che in quella di Martha e nella nostra, vista la diversità di come si presentano. - Per quest'ultima ti consiglio come regalo le Lettere di Mrs Grant (3); - di che cosa parlino, o in quanti volumi siano non lo so, visto che non ne ho mai sentito parlare se non da Miss Irvine, che ne parla come di un lavoro nuovo e molto ammirato, e che le è piaciuto moltissimo. - Ho chiesto qui per questo libro, ma ho scoperto che è del tutto sconosciuto. Credo che metterò anche cinque ampiezze di Lino nella mia balza; ormai lo so che trovo sempre che ce ne sia bisogno di più di quanto mi aspettassi, e che sarei in pena se non ne comprassi più di quanto ne ritenessi necessario, per la Misura esatta, cosa sulla quale la pensiamo in modo molto diverso. - Un vestito leggero da giorno sarà un acquisto indispensabile per te, e ti auguro che sia grazioso. Lo comprerei se fossi tentata, ma finora non ho visto niente del genere. - Stiamo leggendo l'altro libro di Baretti, e lo trovo tremendamente offensivo nei confronti del povero Mr Sharpe. (4) Non posso più stare dalla sua parte contro di te, come ho fatto nove anni fa. - Domenica. - La posta di oggi mi ha portato l'assicurazione di Martha circa il suo arrivo martedì pomeriggio che non potrà essere ostacolato a meno che William non dovesse farle sapere che in quel giorno non c'è nessuna vacanza. (5) La lettera è stata impostata a Basingstoke al loro ritorno da Eversley, dove dice che hanno passato il tempo molto piacevolmente; tuttavia non vede nessun pericolo di essere tentata di riandarci, e dato che si firma col suo nome da ragazza abbiamo immaginato che in definitiva non si sia ancora sposata. (6) - Dev'essere stata una visita molto fredda, ma dato che lei l'ha trovata gradevole suppongo che non ci sia stata penuria di Coperte, e possiamo confidare che la Sorella sia stata attenta a far sapere del suo amore di molti. (7) - Non mi ha fornito nessun particolare, avendo tempo solo per scrivere il necessario. -

Ti auguro una piacevole festa per domani e non molto di più del fatto che ti piaccia il collo di Miss Hatton. - Lady B. dev'essere stata una donna senza vergogna se ha fatto il nome di H. Hales come alla portata di suo Marito. È davvero un'insolenza da parte di una Donna pretendere di scegliere chi vuole, come se supponesse che si debba solo chiedere per avere. - Un Vedovo con 3 figli non ha nessun diritto di guardare più in alto della figlia della sua Governante. - Sono costretta a essere offensiva per mancanza di argomenti, non avendo davvero null'altro da dire. (8) - Quando arriverà Martha mi procurerà argomenti; avrò da dirti quanto le è piaciuta la Casa e che cosa ne pensa di Mary. - Deve fare molto freddo oggi a Godmersham - Qui fa freddo. Mi aspetto un marzo rigido, un aprile piovoso, e un maggio pungente. - E con questa profezia devo concludere. -

I miei cari saluti a tutti - Con affetto, tua J Austen



(1) Vedi la nota 4 alla lettera 49.

(2) L'ultima figlia dei Coleman si chiamava Elizabeth ed era stata battezzata il 14 gennaio; non è chiaro se JA si riferisca a lei, non sapendone il nome, o a una figlia futura.

(3) Anne Grant (1755-1838), Letters from the Mountains, being the real correspondence of a Lady, between the years 1773 and 1807 (1807).

(4) Joseph Baretti (1719-1789), Account of the Manners and Customs of Italy; il libro era stato pubblicato nel 1768 e la seconda edizione (1769) era uscita con un'aggiunta, Appendix added, in Answer to Samuel Sharp, Esq., riferita a un libro di Samuel Sharp (1700?-1778) del 1766: Letters from Italy. L'altro libro di Baretti, era Journey from London to Genoa, pubblicato nel 1770 e che JA aveva evidentemente già letto.

(5) Nel gergo del Winchester College, dove studiava Fulwar-William Fowle, "remedy" stava per "vacanza".

(6) A Eversley si era stabilito da poco Peter Debary, e nella lettera 50 JA, parlando di questa visita, aveva fatto delle ipotesi scherzose su un possibile matrimonio di Debary con Martha Lloyd.

(7) Qui JA potrebbe riferirsi, vista l'opinione poco lusinghiera che aveva della cognata Mary e l'accenno precedente al freddo, a Matteo 24:12: "per il dilagare dell'iniquità, l'amore di molti si raffredderà." ("And because iniquity shall abound, the love of many shall wax cold.").

(8) Sir Brook-William Bridges si risposerà nel 1809 con Dorothy-Elizabeth Hawley (1778-1816), figlia di Sir Henry Hawley.

52
(Wednesday 15-Friday 17 June 1808) - no ms.
Cassandra Austen, Southampton


Godmersham Wednesday June 15

My dear Cassandra

Where shall I begin? Which of all my important nothings shall I tell you first? At half after seven yesterday morning Henry saw us into our own carriage, and we drove away from the Bath Hotel; which, by the bye, had been found most uncomfortable quarters - very dirty, very noisy, and very ill-provided. James began his journey by the coach at five. Our first eight miles were hot; Deptford Hill brought to my mind our hot journey into Kent fourteen years ago; but after Blackheath we suffered nothing, and as the day advanced it grew quite cool. At Dartford, which we reached within the two hours and three-quarters, we went to the Bull, the same inn at which we breakfasted in that said journey, and on the present occasion had about the same bad butter. At half-past ten we were again off, and, travelling on without any adventure reached Sittingbourne by three. Daniel was watching for us at the door of the George, and I was acknowledged very kindly by Mr and Mrs Marshall, to the latter of whom I devoted my conversation, while Mary went out to buy some gloves. A few minutes, of course, did for Sittingbourne; and so off we drove, drove, drove, and by six o'clock were at Godmersham. Our two brothers were walking before the house as we approached, as natural as life. Fanny and Lizzy met us in the Hall with a great deal of pleasant joy; we went for a few minutes into the breakfast parlour, and then proceeded to our rooms. Mary has the Hall chamber. I am in the Yellow room - very literally - for I am writing in it at this moment. It seems odd to me to have such a great place all to myself, and to be at Godmersham without you is also odd. You are wished for, I assure you: Fanny, who came to me as soon as she had seen her Aunt James to her room, and stayed while I dressed, was as energetic as usual in her longings for you. She is grown both in height and size since last year, but not immoderately, looks very well, and seems as to conduct and manner just what she was and what one could wish her to continue. Elizabeth, who was dressing when we arrived, came to me for a minute attended by Marianne, Charles, and Louisa, and, you will not doubt, gave me a very affectionate welcome. That I had received such from Edward also I need not mention; but I do, you see, because it is a pleasure. I never saw him look in better health, and Fanny says he is perfectly well. I cannot praise Elizabeth's looks, but they are probably affected by a cold. Her little namesake has gained in beauty in the last three years, though not all that Marianne has lost. Charles is not quite so lovely as he was. Louisa is much as I expected, and Cassandra I find handsomer than I expected, though at present disguised by such a violent breaking-out that she does not come down after dinner. She has charming eyes and a nice open countenance, and seems likely to be very lovable. Her size is magnificent. I was agreeably surprised to find Louisa Bridges still here. She looks remarkably well (legacies are very wholesome diet), and is just what she always was. John is at Sandling. You may fancy our dinner party therefore; Fanny, of course, belonging to it, and little Edward, for that day. He was almost too happy, his happiness at least made him too talkative. It has struck ten; I must go to breakfast. Since breakfast I have had a tete-a-tete with Edward in his room; he wanted to know James's plans and mine, and from what his own now are I think it already nearly certain that I shall return when they do, though not with them. Edward will be going about the same time to Alton, where he has business with Mr Trimmer, and where he means his son should join him; and I shall probably be his companion to that place, and get on afterwards somehow or other. I should have preferred a rather longer stay here certainly, but there is no prospect of any later conveyance for me, as he does not mean to accompany Edward on his return to Winchester, from a very natural unwillingness to leave Elizabeth at that time. I shall at any rate be glad not to be obliged to be an incumbrance on those who have brought me here, for, as James has no horse, I must feel in their carriage that I am taking his place. We were rather crowded yesterday, though it does not become me to say so, as I and my boa were of the party, and it is not to be supposed but that a child of three years of age was fidgety. I need scarcely beg you to keep all this to yourself, lest it should get round by Anna's means. She is very kindly inquired after by her friends here, who all regret her not coming with her father and mother. I left Henry, I hope, free from his tiresome complaint, in other respects well, and thinking with great pleasure of Cheltenham and Stoneleigh. The brewery scheme is quite at an end: at a meeting of the subscribers last week it was by general, and I believe very hearty, consent dissolved. The country is very beautiful. I saw as much as ever to admire in my yesterday's journey. Thursday. I am glad to find that Anna was pleased with going to Southampton, and hope with all my heart that the visit may be satisfactory to everybody. Tell her that she will hear in a few days from her mamma, who would have written to her now but for this letter. Yesterday passed quite a la Godmersham: the gentlemen rode about Edward's farm, and returned in time to saunter along Bentigh with us; and after dinner we visited the Temple Plantations, which, to be sure, is a Chevalier Bayard of a plantation. James and Mary are much struck with the beauty of the place. To-day the spirit of the thing is kept up by the two brothers being gone to Canterbury in the chair. I cannot discover, even through Fanny, that her mother is fatigued by her attendance on the children. I have, of course, tendered my services, and when Louisa is gone, who sometimes hears the little girls read, will try to be accepted in her stead. She will not be here many days longer. The Moores are partly expected to dine here to-morrow or Saturday. I feel rather languid and solitary - perhaps because I have a cold; but three years ago we were more animated with you and Harriot and Miss Sharpe. We shall improve, I dare say, as we go on. I have not yet told you how the new carriage is liked - very well, very much indeed, except the lining, which does look rather shabby. I hear a very bad account of Mrs Whitefield; a very good one of Mrs Knight, who goes to Broadstairs next month. Miss Sharpe is going with Miss Bailey to Tenby. The Widow Kennet succeeds to the post of laundress. Would you believe it my trunk is come already; and, what completes the wondrous happiness, nothing is damaged. I unpacked it all before I went to bed last night, and when I went down to breakfast this morning presented the rug, which was received most gratefully, and met with universal admiration. My frock is also given, and kindly accepted. Friday. I have received your letter, and I think it gives me nothing to be sorry for but Mary's cold, which I hope is by this time better. Her approbation of her child's hat makes me very happy. Mrs J. A. bought one at Gayleard's for Caroline, of the same shape, but brown and with a feather. I hope Huxham is a comfort to you; I am glad you are taking it. I shall probably have an opportunity of giving Harriot your message to-morrow; she does not come here, they have not a day to spare, but Louisa and I are to go to her in the morning. I send your thanks to Eliza by this post in a letter to Henry. Lady Catherine is Lord Portmore's daughter. I have read Mr Jefferson's case to Edward, and he desires to have his name set down for a guinea and his wife's for another; but does not wish for more than one copy of the work. Your account of Anna gives me pleasure. Tell her, with my love, that I like her for liking the quay. Mrs J. A. seems rather surprised at the Maitlands drinking tea with you, but that does not prevent my approving it. I hope you had not a disagreeable evening with Miss Austen and her niece. You know how interesting the purchase of a sponge-cake is to me. I am now just returned from Eggerton; Louisa and I walked together and found Miss Maria at home. Her sister we met on our way back. She had been to pay her compliments to Mrs Inman, whose chaise was seen to cross the park while we were at dinner yesterday. I told Sackree that you desired to be remembered to her, which pleased her; and she sends her duty, and wishes you to know that she has been into the great world. She went on to town after taking William to Eltham, and, as well as myself, saw the ladies go to Court on the 4th. She had the advantage indeed of me in being in the Palace. Louisa is not so handsome as I expected, but she is not quite well. Edward and Caroline seem very happy here; he has nice playfellows in Lizzy and Charles. They and their attendant have the boys' attic. Anna will not be surprised that the cutting off her hair is very much regretted by several of the party in this house; I am tolerably reconciled to it by considering that two or three years may restore it again. You are very important with your Captain Bulmore and Hotel Master, and I trust, if your trouble over-balances your dignity on the occasion, it will be amply repaid by Mrs Craven's approbation, and a pleasant scheme to see her. Mrs Cooke has written to my brother James to invite him and his wife to Bookham in their way back, which, as I learn through Edward's means, they are not disinclined to accept, but that my being with them would render it impracticable, the nature of the road affording no conveyance to James. I shall therefore make them easy on that head as soon as I can. I have a great deal of love to give from everybody.

Yours most affectionately, Jane

My mother will be glad to be assured that the size of the rug does perfectly well. It is not to be used till winter.

Miss Austen
Castle Square
Southampton

52
(mercoledì 15-venerdì 17 giugno 1808) - no ms.
Cassandra Austen, Southampton


Godmersham mercoledì 15 giugno

Mia cara Cassandra

Da dove comincio? Quali dei miei importanti nonnulla ti dirò per primo? Alle sette e mezza di ieri mattina Henry ci ha visti salire sulla nostra carrozza, e allontanarci dal Bath Hotel; che, tra parentesi, si è rivelato un alloggio estremamente scomodo - molto sporco, molto rumoroso, e molto mal tenuto. James ha iniziato il viaggio con la carrozza pubblica delle cinque. Per le prime otto miglia ha fatto molto caldo; Deptford Hill mi ha fatto venire in mente il nostro viaggio infuocato nel Kent di quattordici anni fa; ma dopo Blackheath non ne abbiamo sofferto più, e man mano che il giorno avanzava è arrivato il fresco. A Dartford, dove siamo arrivati in due ore e tre quarti, siamo andati al Bull, la stessa locanda in cui avevamo fatto colazione nel viaggio che ho già ricordato, e in questa occasione c'era lo stesso burro rancido. Alle dieci e mezza siamo ripartiti, e, viaggiando senza nessun inconveniente abbiamo raggiunto Sittingbourne alle tre. Daniel ci stava aspettando fuori del George, e io sono stata accolta con molta cortesia da Mr e Mrs Marshall, e a quest'ultima ho dedicato la mia conversazione, mentre Mary è uscita per comprare dei guanti. Pochi minuti, naturalmente, spesi a Sittingbourne; e poi di nuovo in corsa, in corsa, in corsa, e per le sei eravamo a Godmersham. Quando siamo arrivati i nostri due fratelli erano a passeggio davanti casa, con estrema naturalezza. Fanny e Lizzy ci sono venute gioiosamente incontro all'Ingresso; siamo stati per qualche minuto nella sala della colazione, e poi siamo andati nelle nostre stanze. Mary ha la camera nel corridoio. Io sono nella stanza gialla - alla lettera - visto che in questo momento ci sto scrivendo. Mi sembra strano avere uno spazio così grande tutto per me, ed è strano anche essere a Godmersham senza di te. Sei molto desiderata, te l'assicuro: Fanny, che è venuta da me subito dopo aver salutato la Zia James nella sua stanza, ed è rimasta mentre mi vestivo, è stata vivace come sempre nel reclamarti. Dall'anno scorso è cresciuta sia in altezza che in corporatura, ma non in modo esagerato, ha un ottimo aspetto, e quanto al comportamento e alle maniere sono quelle passate e quelle che ci si augura continui ad avere in futuro. Elizabeth, che quando siamo arrivati si stava vestendo, è venuta da me per un minuto accompagnata da Marianne, Charles e Louisa, e, non avrai dubbi, mi ha dato un caloroso benvenuto. Che la stessa cosa l'abbia fatta Edward non ho bisogno di dirlo; ma lo faccio, come vedi, perché mi fa piacere. Non l'ho mai visto così in forma, e Fanny dice che è in perfetta salute. Non posso dire bene dell'aspetto di Elizabeth, ma probabilmente ha un raffreddore. La sua piccola omonima ha guadagnato in bellezza negli ultimi tre anni, anche se non quanto ha perso Marianne. Charles non è adorabile com'era prima. Louisa è proprio come mi sarei aspettata, e Cassandra la trovo più bella di quanto mi sarei aspettata, sebbene al momento sia afflitta da una tosse così violenta da non poter scendere se non dopo cena. Ha degli occhi incantevoli e un'espressione aperta e sincera, e sembra probabile che diventerà molto attraente. Sembra molto più grande. Sono rimasta piacevolmente sorpresa nel trovare Louisa Bridges ancora qui. Ha davvero un bell'aspetto (i lasciti sono una dieta molto salutare), ed è esattamente quello che ha sempre voluto. John è a Sandling. Puoi perciò immaginarti il gruppo della cena; Fanny, naturalmente, era della partita, e il piccolo Edward, per questa volta. Era quasi troppo felice, la sua felicità l'ha reso a dir poco troppo chiacchierone. Sono suonate le dieci; devo andare a fare colazione. Dopo la colazione ho avuto un tête-à-tête con Edward nella sua stanza; voleva sapere i programmi di James e i miei, e visti i suoi in questo momento credo sia quasi certo che tornerò quando lo faranno loro, anche se non con loro. Nello stesso periodo Edward deve andare ad Alton, dove ha affari da sbrigare con Mr Trimmer, e dove ha intenzione di farsi raggiungere dal figlio; e probabilmente gli farò compagnia nel viaggio fin là, e poi in un modo o nell'altro proseguirò. Avrei certamente preferito un soggiorno più lungo qui, ma non c'è possibilità di avere un mezzo di trasporto più in là nel tempo, visto che lui non intende accompagnare Edward per il ritorno a Winchester, per la sua più che naturale riluttanza a lasciare sola Elizabeth in quel periodo. (1) Sarò comunque contenta di non essere obbligata a diventare un ingombro per quelli che mi hanno portata qui, poiché, visto che James non ha un cavallo, andare in carrozza con loro mi sarebbe sembrato come prendermi il suo posto. Ieri eravamo piuttosto stipati, anche se dovrei essere l'ultima a dirlo, dato che io e il mio boa eravamo della partita, e da quest'ultimo non si può pretendere che non sia irrequieto come un bambino di tre anni. Non c'è bisogno che ti dica di tenere tutto questo per te, affinché non si risappia per mezzo di Anna. I suoi amici di qui hanno chiesto molto gentilmente di lei, e tutti si sono rammaricati del fatto che non sia venuta col padre e la madre. Ho lasciato Henry, spero, libero dal suo fastidioso disturbo, per il resto bene, e con in mente il ricordo molto piacevole di Cheltenham e Stoneleigh. Il progetto della fabbrica di birra è giunto a conclusione: in un incontro dei soci la settimana scorsa è stato abbandonato con il generale, e immagino molto sincero, consenso. La campagna è bellissima. Ho avuto da ammirare come non mai durante il mio viaggio di ieri. Giovedì. Sono lieta di sapere che ad Anna abbia fatto piacere venire a Southampton, e spero con tutto il cuore che la visita possa essere una soddisfazione per tutti. Dille che tra qualche giorno avrà notizie dalla mamma, che le avrebbe scritto subito se non fosse stato per questa lettera. La giornata di ieri è trascorsa tranquilla a la Godmersham: i signori hanno fatto una cavalcata intorno alla fattoria di Edward, e sono tornati in tempo per fare quattro passi insieme a noi nel bosco di Bentigh; e dopo il pranzo abbiamo visitato la Temple Plantations, che, bisogna riconoscerlo, è lo Chevalier Bayard (2) delle piantagioni. James e Mary sono molto colpiti dalla bellezza del posto. Oggi lo spirito della giornata è sorretto dal fatto che i due fratelli siano andati a Canterbury in calesse. Non riesco a capire, anche tramite Fanny, se la madre sia affaticata dai suoi doveri verso i figli. Naturalmente, ho offerto i miei servigi, e quando se ne sarà andata Louisa, che a volte dà ascolto alle bimbe quando leggono, cercherò di farmi accettare al suo posto. Lei non resterà ancora a lungo. Una parte dei Moore è attesa a pranzo domani o sabato. Mi sento piuttosto fiacca e sola - forse perché ho un raffreddore; ma tre anni fa c'era più movimento con te, Harriot e Miss Sharpe. Andrà meglio, suppongo, con l'andar del tempo. Non ti ho ancora detto com'è la nuova carrozza - molto bella, davvero molto bella, salvo gli interni, che sembrano piuttosto miseri. Ho avuto notizie molto cattive di Mrs Whitefield; e molto buone di Mrs Knight, che il mese prossimo andrà a Broadstairs. Miss Sharpe andrà a Tenby con Miss Bailey. La Vedova Kennet subentra come lavandaia. Non ci crederai ma il baule è già arrivato; e, a completare la perfetta felicità, non c'è nulla di rotto. L'ho svuotato completamente ieri sera prima di andare a letto, e quando stamattina sono scesa per la colazione ho consegnato il copriletto, che è stato accolto con la massima gratitudine, e ha incontrato l'ammirazione universale. C'era anche il mio vestito, che è stato cortesemente accolto. Venerdì. Ho ricevuto la tua lettera, e credo non mi abbia recato nulla di cui dolermi se non il raffreddore di Mary, che spero adesso vada meglio. La sua approvazione per il cappello della bambina mi ha resa molto contenta. Mrs J. A. ne ha comprato uno da Gayleard per Caroline, dello stesso modello, ma marrone e con una piuma. Spero che l'Huxham (3) ti faccia bene; sono lieta che tu l'abbia presa. Domani probabilmente avrò la possibilità di dare il tuo messaggio a Harriot; lei non verrà, non hanno nemmeno un giorno libero, ma Louisa e io andremo da lei in mattinata. Mando i tuoi ringraziamenti a Eliza con questo giro di posta in una lettera a Henry. Lady Catherine è la figlia di Lord Portmore. Ho letto a Edward di Mr Jefferson, e desidera sottoscrivere per una ghinea a suo nome e un'altra per la moglie; ma vuole solo una copia dell'opera. (4) Le notizie che mi hai dato di Anna mi hanno fatto piacere. Dille, col mio affetto, che mi piace la sua predilezione per il molo. Mrs J. A. sembra piuttosto sorpresa del fatto che i Maitland abbiano preso il tè con voi, ma ciò non impedisce la mia approvazione. Spero che non abbiate passato un pomeriggio sgradevole con Miss Austen e sua nipote. Sai quanto mi interessa l'acquisto di un pan di Spagna. Sono appena tornata da Eggerton; Louisa e io siamo andate insieme a piedi a abbiamo trovato Miss Maria in casa. Mentre tornavamo abbiamo incontrato la sorella. Era stata a rendere omaggio a Mrs Inman, che ieri avevamo visto passare in carrozza attraverso il parco mentre eravamo a pranzo. Ho detto a Sackree che mi avevi chiesto di darle i tuoi saluti, cosa che le ha fatto piacere; ti manda i suoi omaggi, e vuole che tu sappia che è stata nel gran mondo. È stata a Londra dopo aver preso William a Eltham, e, come me, il 4 ha visto la sfilata a Corte delle dame. Rispetto a me aveva il vantaggio di essere nel Palazzo. (5) Louisa non è bella come mi aspettavo, ma non sta molto bene. Edward e Caroline sembrano molto contenti di stare qui; lui ha trovato dei piacevoli compagni di gioco in Lizzy e Charles. Stanno nell'attico dei ragazzi insieme alla governante. Anna non si sarà stupita del fatto che il suo essersi tagliata i capelli abbia provocato un forte rammarico in diverse persone in questa casa; io me ne sono fatta quasi una ragione considerando che in due o tre anni ricresceranno. Vedo che dai molta importanza al tuo Capitano e Comandante Bulmore, e spero, se il tuo timore supera il decoro, che sia ampiamente ripagato dall'approvazione di Mrs Craven, e dal piacevole progetto di vederla. Mrs Cooke ha scritto a nostro fratello James per invitare lui e la moglie a Bookham nel loro viaggio di ritorno, invito che, a quanto apprendo da Edward, non sarebbero restii ad accettare, ma che il mio ritorno con loro renderebbe impraticabile, visto che lo stato della strada non permette un altro mezzo di trasporto per James. Non appena posso perciò dovrò tranquillizzarli. Ho un sacco di saluti affettuosi da mandare da parte di tutti.

Con tantissimo affetto, tua, Jane

La mamma sarà lieta di essere rassicurata sulla misura del copriletto, che va perfettamente bene. Non sarà usato fino all'inverno.



(1) Elizabeth Austen era incinta e la nascita era prevista per settembre. Brook-John nascerà il 28 settembre e la madre morirà qualche giorno dopo, il 10 ottobre.

(2) Pierre Terrail de Bayard (1476-1524), nobile francese che divenne la personificazione del "cavaliere senza macchia e senza paura".

(3) Una tintura di corteccia di china che prendeva il nome dal medico che l'aveva ideata: John Huxham (1692-1768).

(4) Il rev. Jefferson aveva pubblicato un libro a suo spese, in vendita tramite sottoscrizione: Two sermons, on the reasonableness, and salutary effects of fearing God, as governor and judge of the world: also an Essay intended as a vindication of Divine justice and moral administration (Due sermoni, sulla fondatezza, e sui salutari effetti del timor di Dio, in quanto padrone e giudice del mondo: con un saggio inteso a difesa della giustizia divina e della rettitudine morale).

(5) Chapman annota: "Sackree era probabilmente stata inviata a Palazzo tramite Mrs Charles Fielding...". Sophia [Finch] Fielding, vedova di Charles Fielding, era una delle dame di compagnia della regina ed era in relazione con la famiglia di Edward Austen in quanto il marito era fratellastro di Sir Brook Bridges III, padre di Elizabeth [Bridges] Austen.

53
(Monday 20-Wednesday 22 June 1808)
Cassandra Austen, Southampton


Godmersham, Monday June 20th.

My dear Cassandra

I will first talk of my visit to Canterbury, as Mrs J. A.'s letter to Anna cannot have given you every particular of it, which you are likely to wish for. - I had a most affectionate welcome from Harriot & was happy to see her looking almost as well as ever. She walked with me to call on Mrs Brydges, when Elizth & Louisa went to Mrs Milles'; - Mrs. B. was dressing & cd not see us, & we proceeded to the White Friars, where Mrs K. was alone in her Drawing room, as gentle & kind & friendly as usual. - She enquired after every body, especially my Mother & yourself. - We were with her a quarter of an hour before Eliz. & Louisa, hot from Mrs Baskerville's Shop, walked in; - they were soon followed by the Carriage, & another five minutes brought Mr Moore himself, just returned from his morng ride. Well! - & what do I think of Mr Moore? - I will not pretend in one meeting to dislike him, whatever Mary may say; but I can honestly assure her that I saw nothing in him to admire. - His manners, as you have always said, are gentlemanlike - but by no means winning. He made one formal enquiry after you. - I saw their little girl, & very small & very pretty she is; her features are as delicate as Mary Jane's, with nice dark eyes, & if she had Mary Jane's fine colour, she wd be quite complete. - Harriot's fondness for her seems just what is amiable & natural, & not foolish. - I saw Caroline also, & thought her very plain. - Edward's plan for Hampshire does not vary. He only improves it with the kind intention of taking me on to Southampton, & spending one whole day with you; & if it is found practicable, Edward Junr will be added to our party for that one day also, which is to be Sunday ye 10th of July. - I hope you may have beds for them. We are to begin our Journey on ye 8th & reach you late on ye 9th. - This morning brought me a letter from Mrs Knight, containing the usual Fee, & all the usual Kindness. She asks me to spend a day or two with her this week, to meet Mrs C. Knatchbull, who with her Husband comes to the W. Friars today - & I beleive I shall go. - I have consulted Edwd - & think it will be arranged for Mrs J. A.'s going with me one morng, my staying the night, & Edward's driving me home the next Eveng. - Her very agreable present will make my circumstances quite easy. I shall reserve half for my Pelisse. - I hope, by this early return I am sure of seeing Catherine & Alethea; - & I propose that either with or without them, you & I & Martha shall have a snug fortnight while my Mother is at Steventon. - We go on very well here, Mary finds the Children less troublesome than she expected, & independant of them, there is certainly not much to try the patience or hurt the Spirits at Godmersham. - I initiated her yesterday into the mysteries of Inman-ism. - The poor old Lady is as thin & chearful as ever, & very thankful for a new acquaintance. - I had called on her before with Eliz. & Louisa. - I find John Bridges grown very old & black, but his manners are not altered; he is very pleasing, & talks of Hampshire with great admiration. - Pray let Anna have the pleasure of knowing that she is remembered with kindness both by Mrs Cooke & Miss Sharpe. Her manners must be very much worsted by your description of them, but I hope they will improve by this visit. - Mrs Knight finishes her letter with "Give my best love to Cassandra when you write to her." - I shall like spending a day at the White Friars very much. - We breakfasted in the Library this morng for the first time, & most of the party have been complaining all day of the heat; but Louisa & I feel alike as to weather, & are cool and comfortable. - Wednesday. - The Moores came yesterday in their Curricle between one & two o'clock, & immediately after the noonshine which succeeded their arrival, a party set off for Buckwell to see the Pond dragged; - Mr Moore, James, Edward & James-Edward on horseback, John Bridges driving Mary in his gig. - The rest of us remained quietly & comfortably at home. - We had a very pleasant Dinner, at the lower end of the Table at least; the merriment was cheifly between Edwd Louisa, Harriot & myself. - Mr Moore did not talk so much as I expected, & I understand from Fanny, that I did not see him at all as he is in general; - our being strangers made him so much more silent & quiet. Had I had no reason for observing what he said & did, I shd scarcely have thought about him. - His manners to her want Tenderness - & he was a little violent at last about the impossibility of her going to Eastwell. - I cannot see any unhappiness in her however; & as to Kind-heartedness &c. she is quite unaltered. - Mary was disappointed in her beauty, & thought him very disagreable; James admires her, & finds him conversible & pleasant. I sent my answer by them to Mrs Knight, my double acceptance of her note & her invitation, which I wrote without much effort; for I was rich - & the Rich are always respectable, whatever be their stile of writing. - I am to meet Harriot at dinner to-morrow; - it is one of the Audit days, and Mr M. dines with the Dean, who is just come to Canterbury. - On Tuesday there is to be a family meeting at Mrs C. Milles's. - Lady Bridges & Louisa from Goodnestone, the Moores, & a party from this House, Elizth John Bridges & myself. It will give me pleasure to see Lady B. - she is now quite well. - Louisa goes home on friday, & John with her; but he returns the next day. These are our engagements; make the most of them. - Mr Waller is dead I see; - I cannot greive about it, nor perhaps can his Widow very much. - Edward began cutting StFoin on saturday & I hope is likely to have favourable weather; - the crop is good. - There has been a cold & sorethroat prevailing very much in this House lately, the Children have almost all been ill with it, & we were afraid Lizzy was going to be very ill one day; she had specks & a great deal of fever. - It went off however, & they are all pretty well now. - I want to hear of your gathering Strawberries, we have had them three times here. - I suppose you have been obliged to have in some white wine, & must visit the Store Closet a little oftener than when you were quite by yourselves. - One begins really to expect the St Albans now, & I wish she may come before Henry goes to Cheltenham, it will be so much more convenient to him. He will be very glad if Frank can come to him in London, as his own Time is likely to be very precious, but does not depend on it. - I shall not forget Charles next week. - So much did I write before breakfast - & now to my agreable surprise I have to acknowledge another Letter from you. - I had not the least notion of hearing before tomorrow, & heard of Russell's being about to pass the Windows without any anxiety. You are very amiable & very clever to write such long Letters; every page of yours has more lines than this, & every line more words than the average of mine. I am quite ashamed - but you have certainly more little events than we have. Mr Lyford supplies you with a great deal of interesting Matter (Matter Intellectual, not physical) - but I have nothing to say of Mr Scudamore. And now, that is such a sad stupid attempt at Wit, about Matter, that nobody can smile at it, & I am quite out of heart. I am sick of myself, & my bad pens. - I have no other complaint however, my languor is entirely removed. - Ought I to be very much pleased with Marmion? - as yet I am not. - James reads it aloud in the Eveng - the short Eveng - beginning at about 10, & broken by supper. - Happy Mrs Harrison & Miss Austen! - You seem to be always calling on them. - I am glad your various civilities have turned out so well; & most heartily wish you Success & pleasure in your present engagement. - I shall think of you tonight as at Netley, & tomorrow too, that I may be quite sure of being right - & therefore I guess you will not go to Netley at all. - This is a sad story about Mrs Powlett. I should not have suspected her of such a thing. - She staid the Sacrament I remember, the last time that you & I did. - A hint of it, with Initials, was in yesterday's Courier; and Mr Moore guessed it to be Ld Sackville, beleiving there was no other Viscount S. in the peerage, & so it proved - Ld Viscount Seymour not being there. - Yes, I enjoy my apartment very much, & always spend two or three hours in it after breakfast. - The change from Brompton Quarters to these is material as to Space. - I catch myself going on to the Hall Chamber now & then. - Little Caroline looks very plain among her Cousins, and tho' she is not so headstrong or humoursome as they are, I do not think her at all more engaging. - Her brother is to go with us to Canterbury tomorrow, & Fanny completes the party. I fancy Mrs K. feels less interest in that branch of the family than any other. I dare say she will do her duty however, by the Boy. - His Uncle Edward talks nonsense to him delightfully - more than he can always understand. The two Morrises are come to dine & spend the day with him. Mary wishes my Mother to buy whatever she thinks necessary for Anna's Shifts; - & hopes to see her at Steventon soon after ye 9th of July, if that time is as convenient to my Mother as any other. - I have hardly done justice to what she means on the subject, as her intention is that my Mother shd come at whatever time She likes best. - They will be at home on ye 9th. -

I always come in for a morning visit from Crondale, & Mr & Mrs Filmer have just given me my due. He & I talked away gaily of Southampton, the Harrisons Wallers &c. - Fanny sends her best Love to You all, & will write to Anna very soon. - Yours very affecly

Jane.

I want some news from Paragon. -

I am almost sorry that Rose Hill Cottage shd be so near suiting us, as it does not quite.

Miss Austen
Castle Square
Southampton

53
(lunedì 20-mercoledì 22 giugno 1808)
Cassandra Austen, Southampton


Godmersham, lunedì 20 giugno.

Mia cara Cassandra

Per prima cosa parlerò della mia visita a Canterbury, dato che la lettera di Mrs J. A. ad Anna non poteva fornirti tutti i particolari, che probabilmente aspetti con ansia. - Sono stata accolta molto affettuosamente da Harriot e sono stata contenta di trovarla più o meno come sempre. Abbiamo fatto una passeggiata insieme per andare a trovare Mrs Brydges, mentre Elizabeth e Louisa andavano da Mrs Milles; - Mrs. B. si stava vestendo e non era in grado di riceverci, e così abbiamo proseguito verso White Friars, dove Mrs K. era da sola in Salotto, garbata, gentile e cordiale come al solito. - Ha chiesto di tutti, in particolare della Mamma e di te. - Eravamo con lei da un quarto d'ora quando sono arrivate Elizabeth e Louisa, direttamente dal negozio di Mrs Baskerville; subito dopo è arrivata la Carrozza, e dopo altri cinque minuti lo stesso Mr Moore, appena tornato dalla sua cavalcata mattutina. Insomma - che cosa ne penso di Mr Moore? - Non pretendo di detestarlo al primo incontro, qualsiasi cosa possa dirne Mary; ma posso onestamente assicurarla che non ho visto in lui nulla da ammirare. - I suoi modi, come hai sempre detto tu, sono signorili - ma per niente accattivanti. Ha chiesto di te in maniera formale. - Ho visto la loro bambina, ed è molto piccola e molto graziosa; ha i lineamenti delicati come quelli di Mary Jane, con dei begli occhi scuri, e se avesse il colorito fine di Mary Jane, sarebbe proprio perfetta. - La tenerezza di Harriot verso di lei sembra quella giusta e naturale, senza esagerazioni. - Ho visto anche Caroline, e mi è sembrata molto semplice. - Il programma di Edward per l'Hampshire non cambia. L'ha solo migliorato con il cortese proposito di portarmi a Southampton, e di passare un'intera giornata con voi; e se sarà possibile, Edward jr. si aggiungerà a noi anche per quel giorno, che sarà domenica 10 luglio. - Spero che tu possa procurare dei letti per loro. Inizieremo il viaggio l'8 e saremo da voi il 9 sul tardi. - Stamattina ho ricevuto una lettera da Mrs Knight, con la solita Regalia, e tutta l'usuale Gentilezza. Mi chiede di passare un giorno o due da lei in settimana, per incontrare Mrs. C. Knatchbull, che oggi arriverà con il Marito a W. Friars - e credo che andrò.- Ho consultato Edward - e credo che ci organizzeremo in modo che Mrs J. A. mi accompagni una mattina, io resti lì una notte, e Edward mi riporti a casa la Sera successiva. - Il suo graditissimo regalo mi renderà le cose facili. Ne riserverò la metà per la mia Mantella. - Spero, col mio ritorno anticipato di poter vedere Catherine e Alethea; - e ho intenzione sia con che senza di loro, di passare, io, te e Martha, un paio di settimane tranquille mentre la Mamma sarà a Steventon. - Qui procede tutto benissimo, Mary trova i Bambini meno fastidiosi di quanto si era aspettata, e indipendentemente da loro, a Godmersham non c'è di sicuro molto che possa mettere a dura prova la pazienza o far stare di cattivo umore. - Ieri l'ho iniziata ai misteri dell'Inman-ismo. (1) - La povera vecchia Signora è magra e allegra come sempre, e molto grata per ogni nuova conoscenza. - Prima ero andata a trovarla con Elizabeth e Louisa. - Trovo John Bridges molto invecchiato e intristito, ma i suoi modi non sono cambiati; è molto simpatico, e parla dell'Hampshire con grande ammirazione. - Per favore fa' che Anna abbia la soddisfazione di sapere che è ricordata con piacere sia da Mrs Cooke che da Miss Sharpe. A quanto mi dici il suo modo di comportarsi dev'essere notevolmente peggiorato, ma spero che con questa visita migliorerà. - Mrs Knight termina la lettera con "Quando scriverai a Cassandra dalle i miei saluti più affettuosi." - Mi piacerà moltissimo trascorrere una giornata a White Friars. - Stamattina abbiamo fatto colazione per la prima volta in Biblioteca, e quasi tutti si sono lamentati per tutto il giorno del caldo; ma Louisa e io ci sentiamo in sintonia con il tempo, e siamo fresche e riposate. - Mercoledì. - I Moore sono arrivati ieri nel loro Calessino tra l'una e le due, e immediatamente dopo gli stuzzichini che erano stati serviti al loro arrivo, una parte della compagnia si è avviata verso Buckwell per vedere il dragaggio dello Stagno; Mr Moore, James, Edward e James-Edward a cavallo, John Bridges con Mary in calesse. La parte restante è rimasta tranquillamente e comodamente a casa. Il Pranzo è stato molto piacevole, almeno nella parte più modesta della Tavola; il divertimento era soprattutto fra Edward Louisa, Harriot e me. - Mr Moore non ha parlato tanto quanto mi sarei aspettata, e ho saputo da Fanny, di non averlo visto affatto com'è di solito; - il fatto che non ci conoscesse lo ha reso così silenzioso e tranquillo. Se non avessi avuto motivo di interessarmi a ciò che diceva e faceva, non l'avrei nemmeno notato. - I suoi modi verso di lei mancano di Tenerezza - e alla fine è stato un po' brusco sull'impossibilità per lei di andare a Eastwell. - Tuttavia non ho notato segni di infelicità in lei, e quanto a Cordialità ecc. è rimasta esattamente la stessa. - Mary è rimasta delusa dalla bellezza di lei, e ha giudicato lui molto antipatico; James ammira lei, e trova lui affabile e simpatico. Ho mandato a Mrs Knight tramite loro il mio duplice gradimento per il biglietto e l'invito, cosa che ho scritto senza sforzarmi troppo; poiché ero ricca - e i Ricchi sono sempre rispettabili, qualunque sia il loro stile epistolare. - Domani a pranzo ci sarà Harriot; è uno dei giorni di Udienza, e Mr. M. pranza con il Decano, che è appena arrivato a Canterbury. Martedì ci sarà una riunione di famiglia da Mrs C. Milles. - Lady Bridges e Louisa da Goodnestone, i Moore, e un gruppo da qui, Elizabeth John Bridges e io. Mi farà piacere vedere Lady B. - non sta molto bene. - Louisa torna a casa venerdì, insieme a John; ma lui tornerà il giorno dopo. Questi sono i nostri impegni; ce li godremo il più possibile. - Vedo che è morto Mr Waller; la cosa non mi addolora, né forse addolorerà molto la sua Vedova. - Edward inizierà sabato a tagliare StFoin e spero che il tempo prometta bene; - il raccolto è buono. - Ultimamente qui ci sono stati numerosi raffreddori e mal di gola, quasi tutti i Bambini ne hanno sofferto, e un giorno abbiamo temuto che Lizzy si stesse ammalando seriamente; aveva delle placche e febbre molto alta. - Comunque è passata, e ora stanno tutti abbastanza bene. - Ho voglia di sapere se hai raccolto le Fragole, qui l'abbiamo fatto tre volte. - Suppongo tu sia stata costretta a prendere del vino bianco, e che tu debba far visita alla Dispensa un po' più spesso di quando era solo per te. - Adesso ci si aspetta davvero la visita dei St Alban, e mi auguro che lei possa arrivare prima che Henry vada a Cheltenham, per lui sarebbe molto più comodo. (2) Gli farebbe molto piacere se Frank potesse andare da lui a Londra, dato che il suo Tempo sarà probabilmente molto prezioso, ma non ci conta. - La settimana prossima non mi dimenticherò di Charles. - Ho scritto così tanto prima di colazione - e ora ho la gradita sorpresa di avere un'altra tua Lettera. - Non avevo la più pallida idea di poter avere notizie prima di domani, e avevo sentito Russell passare vicino alle Finestre senza aspettarmi nulla. Sei molto cortese e molto abile a scrivere Lettere così lunghe; ogni pagina delle tue ha più righe di questa, e ogni riga più parole della media delle mie. Sono davvero imbarazzata - ma tu hai di certo molti più piccoli fatti di quanti ne abbiamo noi. Mr Lyford ti fornisce un bel po' di Materiale interessante (Materiale Intellettuale, non fisico) - ma io non ho nulla da dire su Mr Scudamore. E ora, visto questo deplorevole e stupido tentativo di Arguzia, sul Materiale, che non fa ridere nessuno, sono davvero scoraggiata. Sono nauseata da me stessa, e dalla mia brutta penna. - Comunque non ho ulteriore lamentele, il mio languore è passato del tutto. - Dovrei essere entusiasta di Marmion? (3) - finora non lo sono - James l'ha letto in Serata - Serata breve - iniziata all'incirca alle dieci, e interrotta dalla cena. Felici Mrs Harrison e Miss Austen! - Sembra che tu sia sempre in visita da loro. - Sono lieta che abbiate messo da parte così bene i vari convenevoli; e vi auguro con tutto il cuore Successo e soddisfazione nell'attuale unione. - Stanotte penserò a te a Netley, e domani pure, per essere del tutto certa di essere nel giusto - e quindi immagino che non andrai affatto a Netley. - Quella di Mrs Powlett è una storia triste. Da lei non me lo sarei mai aspettato. Mi ricordo che fece la Comunione, l'ultima volta che l'abbiamo fatta tu e io. - Un accenno, con le Iniziali, era nel numero di ieri del Courier; (4) e Mr Moore ha immaginato che si trattasse di Lord Sackville, credendo che non ci fossero altri Visconti S. nella nobiltà, e così è dimostrato - che il Visconte Lord Seymour non è tra loro. (5) - Sì, mi godo moltissimo la mia stanza, e ci passo sempre due o tre ore dopo la colazione. - Il cambio dai Quartieri di Brompton (6) a questi è sostanziale riguardo allo Spazio. - Ogni tanto mi sorprendo a continuare verso la Camera del Corridoio. - La Piccola Caroline sembra molto semplice in mezzo ai Cugini, e anche se non è così testarda o capricciosa come lo sono loro, non credo affatto che sia più promettente. - Suo fratello domani verrà con noi a Canterbury, e Fanny completerà la compagnia. Immagino che Mrs K. abbia meno interesse per questo ramo della famiglia rispetto a qualsiasi altro. Spero tuttavia che faccia il suo dovere, nei confronti del Ragazzo. (7) - Lo Zio Edward gli dice delle piacevoli assurdità - più di quante egli possa sempre capire. I due Morris verranno a pranzo e passeranno la giornata con lui. Mary desidera che la Mamma compri tutto ciò che ritiene opportuno per il Cambio di Anna; e spera di vederla a Steventon subito dopo il 9 luglio, se quel periodo va bene alla Mamma al pari di altri. - Ho a malapena reso giustizia a ciò che lei pensa sull'argomento, visto che il suo desiderio è che la Mamma vada in qualunque momento le sia più comodo. - Loro saranno a casa il 9. -

Ricevo sempre una visita mattutina da Crondale, e Mr e Mrs Filmer mi hanno appena reso omaggio. Lui e io abbiamo chiacchierato allegramente di Southampton, degli Harrison, dei Waller ecc. - Fanny manda i suoi saluti più affettuosi a Voi tutti, e scriverà presto ad Anna. - Con tanto affetto, tua

Jane.

Vorrei qualche notizia di Paragon. - (8)

Quasi mi dispiace che il Rose Hill Cottage sia così vicino ad andarci bene, visto che non lo è completamente.



(1) Brabourne annota: "Mrs Inman era l'anziana vedova di un ex curato di Godmersham, che viveva in una casa nel parco, ed era uno degli svaghi dei bambini di Godmersham andare da lei dopo mangiato con della frutta. Era cieca, ed era solita passeggiare nel parco con un bastone dal pomo dorato, appoggiandosi al braccio della sua fedele domestica, Nanny Part. Morì nel settembre del 1815."

(2) Con "St Alban" JA potrebbe riferirsi agli Hammond, che abitavano a St Alban's Court, vicino Wingham, nel Kent, ma le frasi successive riguardanti "lei" e Henry Austen mi restano oscure.

(3) Sir Walter Scott, Marmion, pubblicato nel 1808.

(4) Mrs Powlett era scappata con il visconte Sackville. Chapman ci informa di non aver rintracciato la notizia sul "Courier" ma sul "Morning Post" del 18 e del 21 giugno 1808, anche qui con le sole iniziali: "Un'altra fuga d'amore ha avuto luogo nell'alta società. Un Visconte, Lord S., è scappato con una certa Mrs P., moglie di un parente di un Marchese." (18 giugno); "Il faux pas di Mrs P. con Lord S--- ha avuto luogo in una locanda vicino Winchester." (21 giugno).

(5) Probabile che qui JA si riferisca scherzosamente a William Seymour, amico e avvocato di Henry Austen a Londra.

(6) Brompton era un sobborgo di Londra dove in quel periodo abitavano, al n. 16 di Michael's Place, Henry ed Eliza Austen.

(7) Chapman ipotizza che Mrs Knight fosse la madrina di James-Edward Austen.

(8) Paragon era la via di Bath dove abitavano gli zii di JA, James Leigh-Perrot, fratello di Mrs Austen, e la moglie Jane [Cholmeley] Leigh-Perrot.

54
(Sunday 26 June 1808)
Cassandra Austen, Southampton


Godmersham, Sunday June 26th

My dear Cassandra

I am very much obliged to you for writing to me on Thursday, & very glad that I owe the pleasure of hearing from you again so soon, to such an agreable cause; but you will not be surprised, nor perhaps so angry as I shd be, to find that Frank's History had reached me before, in a letter from Henry. - We are all very happy to hear of his health & safety; - he wants nothing but a good Prize to be a perfect Character. - This scheme to the Island is an admirable thing for his wife; she will not feel the delay of his return, in such variety. - How very kind of Mrs Craven to ask her! - I think I quite understand the whole Island arrangements, & shall be very ready to perform my part in them. I hope my Mother will go - & I trust it is certain that there will be Martha's bed for Edward when he brings me home. What can you do with Anna? - for her bed will probably be wanted for young Edward. - His Father writes to Dr Goddard to day to ask leave, & we have the Pupil's authority for thinking it will be granted. - I have been so kindly pressed to stay longer here, in consequence of an offer of Henry's to take me back some time in September, that not being able to detail all my objections to such a plan, I have felt myself obliged to give Edwd and Elizth one private reason for my wishing to be at home in July. - They feel the strength of it, & say no more; - & one can rely on their secrecy. -After this, I hope we shall not be disappointed of our Friends' visit; - my honour, as well as my affection will be concerned in it. - Elizth has a very sweet scheme of our accompanying Edward into Kent next Christmas. A Legacy might make it very feasible; - a Legacy is our sovereign good. - In the mean while, let me remember that I have now some money to spare, & that I wish to have my name put down as a subscriber to Mr Jefferson's works. My last Letter was closed before it occurred to me how possible, how right, & how gratifying such a measure wd be. - Your account of your Visitors good Journey, Voyage, & satisfaction in everything gave me the greatest pleasure. They have nice weather for their introduction to the Island, & I hope with such a disposition to be pleased, their general Enjoyment is as certain as it will be just. - Anna's being interested in the Embarkation shows a Taste that one values. - Mary Jane's delight in the Water is quite ridiculous. Elizabeth supposes Mrs Hall will account for it, by the Child's knowledge of her Father's being at sea. - Mrs J. A. hopes as I said in my last, to see my Mother soon after her return home, & will meet her at Winchester on any day, she will appoint. - And now I beleive I have made all the needful replys & communications; & may disport myself as I can on my Canterbury visit. - It was a very agreable visit. There was everything to make it so; Kindness, conversation, & variety, without care or cost. - Mr Knatchbull from Provendar was at the W. Friars when we arrived, & staid dinner, which with Harriot - who came as you may suppose in a great hurry, ten minutes after the time - made our number 6. - Mr K. went away early; - Mr Moore succeeded him, & we sat quietly working & talking till 10; when he ordered his wife away, & we adjourned to the Dressing room to eat our Tart & Jelly. - Mr M. was not un-agreable, tho' nothing seemed to go right with him. He is a sensible Man, & tells a story well. - Mrs C. Knatchbull & I breakfasted tete a tete the next day, for her Husband was gone to Mr Toke's, & Mrs Knight had a sad headache which kept her in bed. She had had too much company the day before; - after my coming, which was not till past two, she had Mrs M of Nackington, a Mrs & Miss Gregory, & Charles Graham; & she told me it had been so all the morning. - Very soon after breakfast on friday Mrs C. K. - who is just what we have always seen her - went with me to Mrs Brydges' & Mrs Moore's, paid some other visits while I remained with the latter, & we finished with Mrs C. Milles, who luckily was not at home, & whose new House is a very convenient short cut from the Oaks to the W. Friars. - We found Mrs Knight up and better - but early as it was - only 12 o'clock - we had scarcely taken off our Bonnets before company came, Ly. Knatchbull & her Mother; & after them succeeded Mrs White, Mrs Hughes & her two Children, Mr Moore, Harriot & Louisa, & John Bridges, with such short intervals between any, as to make it a matter of wonder to me, that Mrs K. & I should ever have been ten minutes alone, or have had any leisure for comfortable Talk. - Yet we had time to say a little of Everything. - Edward came to dinner, & at 8 o'clock he & I got into the Chair, & the pleasures of my visit concluded with a delightful drive home. - Mrs & Miss Brydges seemed very glad to see me. - The poor old Lady looks much as she did three years ago, & was very particular in her enquiries after my Mother; - and from her, & from the Knatchbulls, I have all manner of kind Compliments to give you both. As Fanny writes to Anna by this post, I had intended to keep my Letter for another day, but recollecting that I must keep it two, I have resolved rather to finish & send it now. The two letters will not interfere I dare say; on the contrary, they may throw light on each other. - Mary begins to fancy, because she has received no message on the subject, that Anna does not mean to answer her Letter; but it must be for the pleasure of fancying it. - I think Elizth better & looking better than when we came. - Yesterday I introduced James to Mrs Inman; - in the evening John Bridges returned from Goodnestone - & this morng before we had left the Breakfast Table we had a visit from Mr Whitfield, whose object I imagine was principally to thank my Eldest Brother for his assistance. Poor Man! - he has now a little intermission of his excessive solicitude on his wife's account, as she is rather better. - James does Duty at Godmersham today. - The Knatchbulls had intended coming here next week, but the Rentday makes it impossible for them to be received, & I do not think there will be any spare time afterwards. They return into Somersetshire by way of Sussex & Hants, & are to be at Fareham - & perhaps may be in Southampton, on which possibility I said all that I thought right - & if they are in the place, Mrs K. has promised to call in Castle Square; - it will be about the end of July. - She seems to have a prospect however of being in that Country again in the Spring for a longer period, & will spend a day with us if she is. - You & I need not tell each other how glad we shall be to receive attention from, or pay it to anyone connected with Mrs Knight. - I cannot help regretting that now, when I feel enough her equal to relish her society, I see so little of the latter. - The Milles' of Nackington dine here on friday & perhaps the Hattons. - It is a compliment as much due to me, as a call from the Filmers. - When you write to the Island, Mary will be glad to have Mrs Craven informed with her Love that she is now sure it will not be in her power to visit Mrs Craven during her stay there, but that if Mrs Craven can take Steventon in her way back, it will be giving my brother & herself great pleasure. - She also congratulates her namesake on hearing from her Husband. - That said namesake is rising in the World; - she was thought excessively improved in her late visit. - Mrs Knight thought her so, last year. - Henry sends us the welcome information of his having had no face-ache since I left them. - You are very kind in mentioning old Mrs Williams so often. Poor Creature! - I cannot help hoping that each Letter may tell of her sufferings being over. - If she wants sugar, I shd like to supply her with it. - The Moores went yesterday to Goodnestone, but return tomorrow. After Tuesday we shall see them no more - tho' Harriot is very earnest with Edwd to make Wrotham in his Journey, but we shall be in too great a hurry to get nearer to it than Wrotham Gate. - He wishes to reach Guilford on friday night - that we may have a couple of hours to spare for Alton. - I shall be sorry to pass the door at Seale without calling, but it must be so - & I shall be nearer to Bookham than I cd wish, in going from Dorking to Guilford - but till I have a travelling purse of my own, I must submit to such things. - The Moores leave Canterbury on friday - & go for a day or two to Sandling. - I really hope Harriot is altogether very happy - but she cannot feel quite so much at her ease with her Husband, as the Wives she has been used to. - Good-bye. I hope You have been long recovered from your worry on Thursday morng - & that you do not much mind not going to the Newbury Races. - I am withstanding those of Canterbury. Let that strengthen you. -

Yrs very sincerely
Jane

Miss Austen
Castle Square
Southampton

54
(domenica 26 giugno 1808)
Cassandra Austen, Southampton


Godmersham, domenica 26 giugno

Mia cara Cassandra

Ti sono molto obbligata per avermi scritto giovedì, e molto lieta di avere il piacere di risentirti così presto, per una ragione così gradevole; ma non sarai sorpresa, né forse in collera come lo sarei io, nello scoprire che la Storia di Frank mi era già arrivata, in una lettera di Henry. - Siamo tutti molto contenti di sentire che è in salute e sano e salvo; - non ha bisogno di altro che di un buon Premio per essere un Carattere perfetto. - Il progetto per l'Isola è eccellente per sua moglie; sarà meno sensibile al ritardo del suo ritorno, in una tale varietà. - Com'è stata gentile Mrs Craven a invitarla! - Credo di capire perfettamente tutti i piani per l'Isola, e sarò prontissima a recitare la mia parte in essi. Spero che la Mamma venga - e confido che ci sarà senz'altro il letto di Martha per Edward quando lui mi porterà a casa. Che cosa si può fare con Anna? - perché il suo letto probabilmente servirà per il giovane Edward. - Il Padre scriverà oggi al Dr. Goddard per chiedergli il permesso, e l'autorevolezza dell'Allievo ci fa pensare che sarà concesso. - Sono stata così gentilmente sollecitata a restare qui più a lungo, in conseguenza di un'offerta di Henry di riportarmi a casa in una data imprecisata di settembre, che non avendo modo di entrare nei dettagli delle mie obiezioni a un simile progetto, mi sono sentita obbligata a fornire a Edward ed Elizabeth un motivo personale per il mio desiderio di essere a casa a luglio. - Ne hanno capito l'importanza, e non insistono; - e si può contare sulla loro discrezione. - Dopo di ciò, spero di non restare delusa circa la visita delle nostre Amiche; il mio onore, così come il mio affetto ne sono coinvolti. (1) - Elizabeth ha il delizioso progetto di farci accompagnare Edward nel Kent per il prossimo Natale. (2) Un Lascito potrebbe renderlo fattibile; - un Lascito è il nostro bene supremo. - Nel frattempo, devo ricordarmi che ora ho un po' di soldi da parte, e voglio sottoscrivere per le opere di Mr Jefferson. (3) Ho chiuso la mia ultima Lettera prima di accorgermi che una tale decisione sarebbe stata possibile, giusta, e gratificante. - La tua descrizione del bel Viaggio, della bella Traversata, e della completa soddisfazione dei tuoi Ospiti mi ha fatto molto piacere. Hanno trovato un tempo favorevole per fare la conoscenza dell'Isola, e spero che con una tale disposizione a essere soddisfatti, il loro Divertimento sia nel complesso tanto certo quanto giusto. - Il fatto che Anna si sia interessata all'Imbarcazione denota un Gusto da apprezzare. - Che Mary Jane sia deliziata dall'Acqua è proprio ridicolo. Elizabeth suppone che Mrs Hall lo giustificherà, con il fatto che la Bimba sappia che suo Padre è in mare. - Mrs J. A. spera come ho detto nella mia ultima lettera, di vedere presto la Mamma al suo ritorno a casa, e la andrà a prendere a Winchester in qualsiasi giorno lei vorrà fissare. - E ora credo di aver concluso con tutte le dovute risposte e comunicazioni; e mi posso sbizzarrire quanto voglio con la mia visita a Canterbury. - È stata una visita molto piacevole. Tutto ha contribuito a renderla tale; Gentilezza, conversazione, e varietà, senza pensieri o spese. - Mr Knatchbull di Provendar era alla W. Friars quando siamo arrivate, ed è rimasto a pranzo, insieme a Harriot - che è arrivata come puoi immaginare in gran fretta, dieci minuti dopo l'ora dovuta - fissata per le 6 - Mr. K. se n'è andato per primo; - Mr Moore ha preso il suo posto, e siamo stati a lavorare e a chiacchierare tranquillamente fino alle 10; quando lui ha ordinato alla moglie di andare via, e noi ci siamo trasferite nel Soggiorno a mangiare Tartine e Gelatine, - Mr M. non è stato sgradevole, anche se nulla sembrava andargli bene. È un Uomo assennato, e sa parlare. - Il giorno dopo Mrs C. Knatchbull e io abbiamo fatto colazione tete a tete, perché il Marito era andato da Mr Toke, e Mrs Knight aveva un brutto mal di testa che l'ha tenuta a letto. Il giorno prima aveva avuto troppa compagnia; - dopo il mio arrivo, che non è stato prima delle due, c'erano stati Mrs M di Nackington, Mrs e Miss Gregory, e Charles Graham; e mi ha detto che era stato così per tutta la mattina - Venerdì subito dopo colazione Mrs C. K. - che è sempre la solita che conosciamo - è venuta con me da Mrs Brydges e da Mrs Moore, è andata a fare qualche altra visita mentre io mi intrattenevo con quest'ultima, e abbiamo concluso con Mrs C. Milles, che per fortuna non c'era, e la cui nuova Casa è in una scorciatoia molto comoda tra Oaks e W. Friars. - Abbiamo trovato Mrs Knight alzata e migliorata - ma presto com'era - solo mezzogiorno - non abbiamo avuto il tempo di toglierci il Cappello che sono arrivati nuovi visitatori, Lady Knatchbull con la Madre; e dopo di loro Mrs White, Mrs Hughes con i suoi due Bambini, Mr Moore, Harriot e Louisa, e John Bridges, con talmente poco intervallo l'uno dall'altro, da farmi sorgere il dubbio, se Mrs K. e io avremmo mai avuto dieci minuti per restare da sole, o un po' di tempo libero per fare comodamente due Chiacchiere. - Comunque abbiamo avuto il tempo di parlare un po' di Tutto. - Edward è venuto a pranzo, e alle 8 lui e io eravamo in Carrozza, e i piaceri della mia visita si sono conclusi con un delizioso ritorno a casa. - Mrs e Miss Brydges sono sembrate molto contente di vedermi. - La povera vecchia Signora è tale e quale a tre anni fa, e ha chiesto in modo particolare della Mamma; - e da lei, e dai Knatchbull, ho ricevuto tutti i gentili Omaggi da girare a voi due. Dato che Fanny scrive ad Anna con questo stesso giro di posta, avevo previsto di trattenere questa Lettera ancora per un giorno, ma ricordandomi che l'avrei dovuta trattenere per due, (4) ho deciso invece di concluderla e spedirla ora. Confido che le due lettere non interferiscano; al contrario, potrebbero far luce l'una sull'altra. - Mary comincia a immaginare, non avendo ricevuto nulla sull'argomento, che Anna non intenda rispondere alla sua Lettera; ma dev'essere per il piacere di fantasticare. - Mi sembra che Elizabeth stia meglio e abbia un aspetto migliore di quando siamo arrivati. - Ieri ho presentato James a Mrs Inman; - in serata John Bridges è tornato da Goodnestone - e stamattina prima di alzarmi da Tavola dopo Colazione abbiamo avuto la visita di Mr Whitfield, il cui oggetto immagino fosse principalmente quello di ringraziare il mio Fratello Maggiore per il suo aiuto. Pover'uomo! - ora ha un po' di pausa dalla sua eccezionale sollecitudine riguardo alla moglie, visto che lei sta un po' meglio. - Oggi a Godmersham officerà James. - I Knatchbull avevano previsto di venire la prossima settimana, ma il Giorno degli affitti rende impossibile riceverli, e non penso che dopo possa esserci tempo disponibile. Tornano nel Somersetshire passando per il Sussex e l'Hampshire, e saranno a Fareham - e forse probabilmente a Southampton, sulla cui possibilità ho detto tutto ciò che credevo giusto - e se ci saranno, Mrs K. ha promesso di far visita a Castle Square; sarà all'incirca alla fine di luglio. - Comunque lei sembra avere l'intenzione di tornarci in Primavera per un periodo più lungo, e se lo farà passerà una giornata con noi. - Tu e io non abbiamo bisogno di dirci quanto saremo liete di ricevere l'omaggio, o di tributarlo, da parte di chiunque sia imparentato con Mrs Knight. - Non posso fare a meno di rammaricarmi del fatto che ora, quando mi sento all'altezza di apprezzare la sua compagnia, io sappia così poco di quest'ultima. - I Milles di Nackington pranzeranno qui venerdì e forse gli Hatton. È un omaggio soprattutto a me, così come una visita dei Filmer. - Quando scriverai all'Isola, a Mary farebbe piacere informare Mrs Craven con i suoi affettuosi saluti che ora è sicura di non poter far visita a Mrs Craven durante la sua permanenza là, ma che se Mrs Craven passerà per Steventon al ritorno, per lei e per mio fratello sarà un grande piacere. - Si congratula anche con la sua omonima per aver avuto notizie dal Marito. Detta omonima sta risalendo la china; - è stata trovata eccezionalmente migliorata durante la sua ultima visita. - Mrs Knight l'ha giudicata così, l'anno scorso. - Henry ci ha mandato la gradita notizia di non aver avuto nevralgie da quando li ho lasciati. - Sei molto gentile a ricordarti così spesso della vecchia Mrs Williams. Poverina! - Non posso fare a meno di sperare che ogni Lettera possa informarmi che le sue sofferenze siano terminate. - Se ha bisogno di zucchero, mi piacerebbe mandarglielo. - Ieri i Moore sono andati a Goodnestone, ma tornano domani. Dopo giovedì non li vedremo più - anche se Harriot insiste con Edward affinché passi per Wrotham durante il Viaggio, ma andremo talmente di fretta che al massimo potremo passare vicino al paese. - Lui vuole raggiungere Guilford venerdì sera - affinché si possano avere un paio d'ore di riserva per Alton. - Mi dispiacerà passare per Seale senza una visita, ma dev'essere così - e mi avvicinerò a Bookham più di quanto possa desiderare, andando da Dorking a Guilford - ma finché non avrò soldi miei per viaggiare, devo sottostare a queste cose. - I Moore partiranno da Canterbury venerdì - e andranno per un giorno o due a Sandling. - Spero davvero che tutto considerato Harriot sia realmente contenta - ma non potrà mai sentirsi così a proprio agio con il Marito, come le Mogli a cui era abituata. - Arrivederci. Spero che Tu ti sia ormai ripresa dal tuo disturbo di giovedì mattina - e che non stai pensando di non andare alle Corse di Newbury. - Io sto resistendo a quelle di Canterbury. Fa' che ti irrobustiscano. -

Sinceramente tua,
Jane



(1) Le Faye annota: "Catherine e Alethea Bigg avevano in programma una visita a Southampton. Il motivo personale fornito a Edward Austen e alla moglie potrebbe essere stato in relazione al breve e infruttuoso corteggiamento di Harris Bigg-Wither nel 1802; JA potrebbe aver pensato che restare a Godmersham sarebbe apparso come un deliberato tentativo di evitare di incontrare le sue due sorelle." L'ipotesi di Le Faye appare molto plausibile, visto anche l'accenno all'onore e all'affetto.

(2) Il figlio di Edward Austen studiava al Winchester College e sarebbe tornato a casa per le vacanze natalizie.

(3) Vedi la nota 4 alla lettera 52.

(4) Probabile che la posta da Godmersham non partisse tutti i giorni.

55
(Thursday 30 June-Friday 1 July 1808)
Cassandra Austen, Southampton


Godmersham, Thursday June 30th

My dear Cassandra

I give you all Joy of Frank's return, which happens in the true Sailor way, just after our being told not to expect him for some weeks. - The Wind has been very much against him, but I suppose he must be in our Neighbourhood by this time. Fanny is in hourly expectation of him here. - Mary's visit in the Island is probably shortened by this Event. Make our kind Love & Congratulations to her. - What cold, disagreeable weather, ever since Sunday! - I dare say you have Fires every day. My kerseymere Spencer is quite the comfort of our Eveng walks. - Mary thanks Anna for her Letter, & wishes her to buy enough of her new coloured frock to make a shirt handkf. - I am glad to hear of her Aunt Maitland's kind present. - We want you to send us Anna's height, that we may know whether she is as tall as Fanny; - and pray can you tell me of any little thing that wd be probably acceptable to Mrs F. A. - I wish to bring her something; - has she a silver knife - or wd you recommend a Broche? I shall not spend more than half a guinea about it. - Our Tuesday's Engagement went off very pleasantly; we called first on Mrs Knight, & found her very well; & at dinner had only the Milles' of Nackington in addition to Goodnestone & Godmersham & Mrs Moore. - Lady Bridges looked very well, & wd have been very agreable I am sure, had there been time enough for her to talk to me, but as it was, she cd only be kind & amiable, give me good-humoured smiles & make friendly enquiries. - Her son Edward was also looking very well, & with manners as un-altered as hers. In the Eveng came Mr Moore, Mr Toke, Dr & Mrs Walsby & others ; - one Card Table was formed, the rest of us sat & talked, & at half after nine we came away. - Yesterday my two Brothers went to Canterbury, and J. Bridges left us for London in his way to Cambridge, where he is to take his Master's Degree. - Edward & Caroline & their Mama have all had the Godmersham Cold; the former with sorethroat & fever which his Looks are still suffering from. - He is very happy here however, but I beleive the little girl will be glad to go home; - her Cousins are too much for her. - We are to have Edward, I find, at Southampton while his Mother is in Berkshire for the Races - & are very likely to have his Father too. If circumstances are favourable, that will be a good time for our scheme to Beaulieu. - Lady E. Hatton called here a few mornings ago, her Daughter Elizth with her, who says as little as ever, but holds up her head & smiles & is to be at the Races. - Annamaria was there with Mrs Hope, but we are to see her here tomorrow. - So much was written before breakfast; it is now half past twelve, & having heard Lizzy read, I am moved down into the Library for the sake of a fire which agreably surprised us when we assembled at Ten, & here in warm & happy solitude proceed to acknowledge this day's Letter. We give you credit for your spirited voyage, & are very glad it was accomplished so pleasantly, & that Anna enjoyed it so much. - I hope you are not the worse for the fatigue - but to embark at 4 you must have got up at 3, & most likely had no sleep at all. - Mary's not chusing to be at home, occasions a general small surprise. - As to Martha, she has not the least chance in the World of hearing from me again, & I wonder at her impudence in proposing it. - I assure you I am as tired of writing long letters as you can be. What a pity that one should still be so fond of receiving them! - Fanny Austen's Match is quite news, & I am sorry she has behaved so ill. There is some comfort to us in her misconduct, that we have not a congratulatory Letter to write. - James & Edward are gone to Sandling to day; - a nice scheme for James, as it will shew him a new & fine Country. Edward certainly excels in doing the Honours to his visitors, & providing for their amusement. - They come back this Eveng. - Elizabeth talks of going with her three girls to Wrotham while her husband is in Hampshire; - she is improved in looks since we first came, & excepting a cold, does not seem at all unwell. She is considered indeed as more than usually active for her situation & size. - I have tried to give James pleasure by telling him of his Daughter's Taste, but if he felt, he did not express it. - I rejoice in it very sincerely. - Henry talks, or rather writes of going to the Downes, if the St Albans continues there - but I hope it will be settled otherwise. - I had everybody's congratulations on her arrival, at Canterbury; - it is pleasant to be among people who know one's connections & care about them; & it amuses me to hear John Bridges talk of "Frank." - I have thought a little of writing to the Downs, but I shall not; it is so very certain that he wd be somewhere else when my Letter got there. - Mr Tho. Leigh is again in Town - or was very lately. Henry met with him last sunday in St James's Church. - He owned being come up unexpectedly on Business - which we of course think can be only one business - & he came post from Adlestrop in one day, which - if it cd be doubted before - convinces Henry that he will live for ever. - Mrs Knight is kindly anxious for our Good, & thinks Mr L. P. must be desirous for his Family's sake to have everything settled. - Indeed, I do not know where we are to get our Legacy - but we will keep a sharp look-out. - Lady B. was all in prosperous Black the other day. - A Letter from Jenny Smallbone to her Daughter brings intelligence which is to be forwarded to my Mother, the calving of a Cow at Steventon. - I am also to give her Mama's Love to Anna, & say that as her Papa talks of writing her a Letter of comfort she will not write, because she knows it wd certainly prevent his doing so. - When are calculations ever right? - I could have sworn that Mary must have heard of the St Albans return, & wd have been wild to come home, or to be doing something. - Nobody ever feels or acts, suffers or enjoys, as one expects. - I do not at all regard Martha's disappointment in the Island; she will like it the better in the end. - I cannot help thinking & re-thinking of your going to the Island so heroically. It puts me in mind of Mrs Hastings' voyage down the Ganges, & if we had but a room to retire into to eat our fruit, we wd have a picture of it hung there. - Friday July 1st - The weather is mended, which I attribute to my writing about it - & I am in hopes, as you make no complaint, tho' on the Water & at 4 in the morng - that it has not been so cold with you. - It will be two years tomorrow since we left Bath for Clifton, with what happy feelings of Escape! - This post has brought me a few lines from the amiable Frank, but he gives us no hope of seeing him here. - We are not unlikely to have a peep at Henry who, unless the St Albans moves quickly, will be going to the Downs, & who will not be able to be in Kent without giving a day or two to Godmersham. - James has heard this morng from Mrs Cooke, in reply to his offer of taking Bookham in his way home, which is kindly accepted; & Edwd has had a less agreeable answer from Dr Goddard, who actually refuses the petition. Being once fool enough to make a rule of never letting a Boy go away an hour before the Breaking up Hour, he is now fool enough to keep it. - We are all disappointed. - His Letter brings a double disappointment, for he has no room for George this summer. - My Brothers returned last night at 10, having spent a very agreable day in the usual routine. They found Mrs D. at home, & Mr D. returned from Business abroad, to dinner. James admires the place very much, & thinks the two Eldest girls handsome - but Mary's beauty has the preference. - The number of Children struck him a good deal, for not only are their own Eleven all at home, but the three little Bridgeses are also with them. - James means to go once more to Canty to see his friend Dr Marlowe, who is coming about this time; - I shall hardly have another opportunity of going there. In another week I shall be at home - & then, my having been at Godmersham will seem like a Dream, as my visit at Brompton seems already. The Orange Wine will want our Care soon. - But in the meantime for Elegance & Ease & Luxury -; the Hattons' & Milles' dine here today - & I shall eat Ice & drink French wine, & be above Vulgar Economy. Luckily the pleasures of Friendship, of unreserved Conversation, of similarity of Taste & Opinions, will make good amends for Orange Wine. -

Little Edwd is quite well again.-

Yrs affecly with Love from all, JA.

Miss Austen
Castle Square
Southampton

55
(giovedì 30 giugno-venerdì 1 luglio 1808)
Cassandra Austen, Southampton


Godmersham, giovedì 30 giugno

Mia cara Cassandra

Ti mando tutta la mia Gioia per il ritorno di Frank, che è avvenuto da vero Marinaio, subito dopo esserci dette che non dovevamo aspettarcelo prima di qualche settimana. - Il Vento gli è stato molto contrario, ma presumo che ormai sia nelle Vicinanze. Fanny l'aspetta qui da un momento all'altro. - La Circostanza probabilmente abbrevierà la visita di Mary all'Isola. Falle le nostre Felicitazioni insieme ai nostri affettuosi saluti. - Che tempo freddo e fastidioso, da domenica in poi! - Immagino che accenderai il Fuoco tutti i giorni. Il mio Mantello di lana pesante è proprio una comodità per le nostre passeggiate Pomeridiane. - Mary ringrazia Anna per la sua Lettera, e vuole che le compri della stoffa come quella della sua nuova tunica colorata per fare uno di quei foulard che si portano come una camicetta. - Sono contenta di sentire del gentile regalo di sua Zia Maitland. - Ci devi dire quanto è alta Anna, affinché noi si possa stabilire se lo è quanto Fanny; - e ti prego di darmi un'idea per una qualche cosetta che sarebbe probabilmente gradita a Mrs F. A. - Vorrei portarle qualcosa; - ha un coltello d'argento - o consiglieresti uno Spiedo? Non ho più di mezza ghinea da spenderci. - Il nostro Impegno di martedì si è svolto molto piacevolmente; abbiamo cominciato con la visita a Mrs Knight, e l'abbiamo trovata molto bene; e a pranzo c'erano solo i Milles di Nackington in aggiunta a Goodnestone, Godmersham e Mrs Moore. Lady Bridges aveva un ottimo aspetto, e sono certa che sarebbe stata molto gradevole, se avesse avuto abbastanza tempo per chiacchierare con me, ma così stando le cose, ha potuto soltanto essere gentile e simpatica, con cordiali sorrisi e amichevoli richieste di informazioni. - Anche il figlio Edward aveva un ottimo aspetto, e modi immutati come quelli di lei. Nel Pomeriggio sono venuti Mr Moore, Mr Toke, il Dr Walsby con la moglie e altri; - è stato formato un Tavolo da Gioco, il resto di noi è rimasto a chiacchierare, e alle nove e mezza ce ne siamo andati. - Ieri i miei due Fratelli sono andati a Canterbury, e J. Bridges ci ha lasciati per Londra sulla via di Cambridge, dove prenderà il suo Dottorato. - Edward e Caroline e la loro Mamma hanno tutti avuto il Raffreddore di Godmersham; il primo con mal di gola e febbre di cui sta ancora soffrendo. - Tuttavia lui è molto contento di stare qui, mentre credo che la bambina sarebbe lieta di tornarsene a casa; - i Cugini sono troppo per lei. - Avremo Edward a Southampton, immagino, mentre la Madre sarà nel Berkshire per le Corse - e molto probabilmente ci sarà anche il Padre. Se le circostanze saranno favorevoli, potrebbe essere una buona cosa per il nostro progetto di andare a Beaulieu. - Qualche giorno fa ci ha fatto visita Lady E. Hatton, insieme alla Figlia Elizabeth, che parla poco come sempre, ma va a testa alta e sorride e andrà alle Corse. - Annamaria era con Mrs Hope, ma la vedremo domani. - Ho scritto così tanto prima di colazione; ora sono le dodici e mezza, e avendo sentito Lizzy leggere, sono scesa in Biblioteca per amore di un fuoco che ci aveva piacevolmente sorpreso quando ci siamo riuniti alle Dieci, e qui in calda e felice solitudine passo a rispondere alla tua Lettera di oggi. Ti abbiamo reso onore per la vivace traversata, e siamo molto contenti che si sia svolta in modo tanto piacevole, e che Anna l'abbia gradita così tanto - Spero che tu non sia la più affaticata - ma per imbarcarti alle 4 devi esserti alzata alle 3, e più probabilmente non essere andata affatto a dormire. - La scelta di Mary di non tornare a casa, è un po' sorprendente per tutti. - Quanto a Martha, non ha la minima possibilità di ricevere di nuovo notizie da me, e mi meraviglia la sua sfacciataggine nel proporlo. - Ti assicuro che sono stanca quanto te di scrivere Lettere così lunghe. Che peccato essere ancora così ansiose di riceverne! - Il Matrimonio di Fanny Austen è un'assoluta novità, e mi dispiace che si sia comportata così male. Per noi c'è una consolazione nella sua cattiva condotta, che non dobbiamo scrivere una Lettera di congratulazioni. - Oggi James e Edward sono andati a Sandling; - un programma piacevole per James, dato che gli permetterà di vedere per la prima volta una zona molto bella. Di certo Edward eccelle nel fare gli Onori di casa ai suoi Ospiti, e nel provvedere al loro svago. - Torneranno in serata. - Elizabeth parla di andare con le tre figlie a Wrotham mentre il marito sarà nell'Hampshire; - da quando siamo arrivati il suo aspetto è migliorato, e salvo un raffreddore, sembra che non sia affatto indisposta. È da considerare davvero molto più attiva del normale per la sua situazione e la sua grossezza. (1) - Ho cercato di far piacere a James raccontandogli del Buongusto della Figlia, ma se ha sentito, non l'ha dato a vedere. - Io me ne sono sinceramente rallegrata. - Henry parla, o meglio scrive di andare nelle Downs, (2) se i St Alban resteranno là - ma spero che possa andare altrimenti. - Ho avuto le felicitazioni di tutti per il suo (3) arrivo, a Canterbury; - è bello essere in mezzo a gente che conosce le parentele e se ne interessa; e mi ha divertito sentire John Bridges parlare di "Frank". - Per un po' ho pensato di scrivere alle Downs, ma non lo farò; se lo facessi all'arrivo della mia Lettera lui di sicuro sarebbe da qualche altra parte. - Mr Thomas Leigh è di nuovo a Londra - o c'era molto di recente. Henry l'ha incontrato domenica scorsa nella chiesa di St James. - Ha ammesso di essere arrivato all'improvviso per Affari - che noi naturalmente sappiamo essere solo un affare - ed era venuto da Adlestrop in un giorno con la vettura di posta, il che - se prima poteva esserci qualche dubbio - ha convinto Henry che ci vivrà per sempre. - Mrs Knight è gentilmente inquieta per i nostri Beni, e crede che Mr L. P. debba voler vedere tutto sistemato per amore della Famiglia. - A dire il vero, non so se avremo il nostro Lascito - ma terremo gli occhi ben aperti. - L'altro giorno Lady B. era tutta vestita in un florido Nero. - Una Lettera di Jenny Smallbone alla Figlia reca la notizia che sarà inoltrata alla Mamma, del parto di una Mucca a Steventon. - La sua Mamma manda saluti affettuosi ad Anna, e dice che visto che il suo Papà parla di scriverle una Lettera di consolazione lei non scriverà, poiché sa che ciò eviterebbe a lui di farlo. - Quando mai sono giusti questi calcoli? - Avrei giurato che Mary doveva aver saputo del ritorno dei St Alban, e che avrebbe voluto a tutti i costi tornare a casa, o comunque fare qualcosa. - Nessuno mai reagisce o si comporta, nella gioia o nel dolore, come ci si aspetta. - Non do affatto importanza alla delusione di Martha nell'Isola; alla fine vedrai che le piacerà di più. - Non posso fare a meno di pensare e ri-pensare al tuo viaggio così eroico nell'Isola. Mi fa venire in mente il viaggio di Mrs Hastings sul Gange, (4) e se solo avessimo una stanza tutta per noi per mangiare la nostra frutta, ci appenderemmo un quadro del genere. (5) - Venerdì 1° luglio - Il tempo si è aggiustato, cosa che attribuisco al fatto che ne ho scritto - e spero, visto che tu non ti lamenti, anche se in Acqua alle 4 del mattino - che da te non sia così freddo. - Domani saranno due anni da quando lasciammo Bath per Clifton, con quale gioiosa sensazione di Fuga! - Il giro di posta mi ha recato qualche riga dall'amabile Frank, ma non ci dà nessuna speranza di vederlo qui. - Non è improbabile che si possa dare una sbirciata a Henry che, a meno che i St Alban non si muovano subito, andrà nelle Downs, e che non potrà venire nel Kent senza regalare un giorno o due a Godmersham. - James ha saputo stamattina da Mrs Cooke, che la sua proposta di passare per Bookham sulla strada del ritorno, è gentilmente accettata; e Edward ha ricevuto una risposta meno gradevole dal Dr Goddard, che di fatto rifiuta la richiesta. (6) Essendo stato abbastanza stupido una volta da stabilire la regola di non permettere mai a un Ragazzo di uscire un'ora prima del previsto, ora è abbastanza stupido da rispettarla. - Siamo tutti delusi. - La sua Lettera ha provocato una delusione doppia, poiché questa estate non ci sarà posto per George. - I miei Fratelli sono tornati ieri sera alle 10, dopo aver passato una piacevole giornata nella solita routine. Hanno trovato Mrs D. a casa, e Mr D. tornato da Faccende in giro, per pranzo. A James il posto piace molto, e ritiene attraenti le due figlie Maggiori - ma la bellezza che preferisce è quella di Mary. - Il numero di Bambini lo ha molto colpito, perché non solo i loro Undici erano tutti a casa, ma con loro c'erano anche i tre piccoli Bridges. (7) James intende andare ancora una volta a Canterbury a trovare il suo amico, il Dr Marlowe, che arriverà a breve; - io avrò difficilmente un'altra opportunità di andarci. Fra una settimana sarò a casa - e allora, il mio essere stata a Godmersham apparirà come un Sogno, come già sembra la mia visita a Brompton. Il Vino Arancio (8) avrà presto bisogno delle nostre Cure. - Ma nel frattempo nell'interesse dell'Eleganza, della Comodità e del Lusso -; gli Hatton e i Milles oggi pranzeranno qui - e io mangerò Gelato e berrò vino francese, e sarò al di sopra della volgare Economia. Per fortuna i piaceri dell'Amicizia, di una Conversazione cordiale, di Gusti e Opinioni simili, faranno ammenda per il Vino Arancio. -

Il piccolo Edward si è rimesso completamente.-

Con cari saluti da tutti, la tua affezionata, JA.



(1) Elizabeth Austen era incinta di Brook-John, che nascerà il 28 settembre 1808; pochi giorni dopo il parto, il 10 ottobre, Elizabeth morirà.

(2) La zona di mare tra le "Goodwin Sands" nella parte orientale della costa del Kent.

(3) JA scrive "her" e probabilmente si riferisce alla cugina Eliza, moglie di Henry.

(4) Nel 1782 Marion, moglie di Warren Hastings, sfidando le burrasche della stagione dei monsoni, fece un lungo e pericoloso viaggio attraverso il Gange, percorrendo 400 miglia in tre giorni, per andare ad assistere il marito, gravemente malato. Qualche anno dopo il loro ritorno in Inghilterra Hastings incaricò William Hodges di illustrare quella vicenda, e il risultato fu una grande tela conosciuta come Mrs Hastings at the Rocks of Colgong. Questo quadro (vedi sotto), insieme ad altri di Hodges sempre con soggetti indiani, era appeso nella «picture room» a Daylesford, e il pittore aveva lavorato sulla base del racconto di Mrs Hastings nei suoi Travels: "A Colgong c'è un considerevole corso d'acqua che s'immette nel Gange, e la forte corrente, particolarmente nei ricorrenti periodi monsonici, ha fatto sì che si staccassero due grossi pezzi di roccia, facendoli diventare due isole, coperte di vegetazione, a più di cinquanta metri dalla riva. Tra le isole e la riva c'è un passaggio disseminato di rocce sommerse, che formano violenti mulinelli. In alcuni periodi il passaggio è praticabile solo con piccole imbarcazioni e nel periodo dei monsoni diventa estremamente pericoloso. Sapevo che ogni istante poteva essere fatale." (in: Hermione de Almeida e George H. Gilpin, Indian Renaissance: British Romantic Art and the Prospect of India, Ashgate Publishing Limited, Aldershot, Hants, 2006, pag. 267). Warren Hastings era stato amico e socio in India di Tysoe Saul Hancock, marito della sorella dei rev. Austen e padre di Eliza de Feuillide, e mantenne rapporti con madre e figlia anche in Inghilterra, dopo la morte di Hancock.

(5) Evidentemente JA pensava che l'unica "avventura" immaginabile per lei e la sorella fosse chiudersi in una stanza a mangiare frutta.

(6) Edward Austen aveva chiesto al Dr Goddard, di concedere qualche giorno di vacanza in più al figlio Edward (vedi la lettera precedente).

(7) Gli undici figli dei Deedes erano: Sophia (1793), Mary (1794), Fanny (1795), William (1796), Julius (1798), Isabella (1799), Henry (1800), Edward (1801) , John (1803), George (1806), Charles (1808); Harriet (1805) e Elizabeth (1807) erano morti in tenera età. Dopo il 1808 i Deeedes ebbero altri sei figli: Robert (1809), Lewis (1811), Edmund (1812), Louisa (1813), Marianne (1817) e Emily (1818), per un totale di diciannove. I tre piccoli Bridges erano Brook-William jr. (1801-?), Brook-George jr. (1802-?) e Eleanor (1805-?), figli di Sir Brook-William Bridges.

(8) "Orange Wine" può essere un vino fatto col succo d'arancia ma anche un vino con uve bianche, lavorato in modo particolare, che assume un colore arancione. Non so a quale dei due si riferisca JA, anche se all'epoca credo che le arance in Inghilterra fossero abbastanza rare.

56
(Saturday 1 - Sunday 2 October 1808)
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Castle Square, Saturday Octr 1

My dear Cassandra

Your letter this morning was quite unexpected, & it is well that it brings such good news to counterbalance the disappointment to me of losing my first sentence, which I had arranged full of proper hopes about your Journey, intending to commit them to paper today, & not looking for certainty till tomorrow. - We are extremely glad to hear of the birth of the Child, & trust everything will proceed as well as it begins; - his Mama has our best wishes, & he our second best for health & comfort - tho' I suppose unless he has our best too, we do nothing for her. - We are glad it was all over before your arrival; - & I am most happy to find who the Godmother is to be. - My Mother was some time guessing the names. - Henry's present to you gives me great pleasure, & I shall watch the weather for him at this time with redoubled interest. - We have had 4 brace of Birds lately, in equal Lots from Shalden & Neatham. - Our party at Mrs Duer's produced the novelties of two old Mrs Pollens & Mrs Heywood, with whom my Mother made a Quadrille Table; & of Mrs Maitland & Caroline, & Mr Booth without his sisters at Commerce. - I have got a Husband for each of the Miss Maitlands; - Coln Powlett & his Brother have taken Argyle's inner House, & the consequence is so natural that I have no ingenuity in planning it. If the Brother shd luckily be a little sillier than the Colonel, what a treasure for Eliza. - Mr Lyford called on tuesday to say that he was disappointed of his son & daughter's coming, & must go home himself the following morng; - & as I was determined that he shd not lose every pleasure I consulted him on my complaint. He recommended cotton moistened with oil of sweet almonds, & it has done me good. - I hope therefore to have nothing more to do with Eliza's receipt than to feel obliged to her for giving it as I very sincerely do. -

Mrs Tilson's remembrance gratifies me, & I will use her patterns if I can; but poor Woman! how can she be honestly breeding again? - I have just finished a Handkf. for Mrs James Austen, which I expect her Husband to give me an opportunity of sending to her ere long. Some fine day in October will certainly bring him to us in the Garden, between three & four o'clock. - She hears that Miss Bigg is to be married in a fortnight. I wish it may be so. - About an hour & half after your toils on Wednesday ended, ours began; - at seven o'clock, Mrs Harrison, her two daughters & two Visitors, with Mr Debary & his eldest sister walked in; & our Labour was not a great deal shorter than poor Elizabeth's, for it was past eleven before we were delivered. - A second pool of Commerce, & all the longer by the addition of the two girls, who during the first had one corner of the Table & Spillikins to themselves, was the ruin of us; - it completed the prosperity of Mr Debary however, for he won them both. - Mr Harrison came in late, & sat by the fire - for which I envied him, as we had our usual luck of having a very cold Eveng. It rained when our company came, but was dry again before they left us. - The Miss Ballards are said to be remarkably well-informed; their manners are unaffected and pleasing, but they do not talk quite freely enough to be agreable - nor can I discover any right they had by Taste or Feeling to go their late Tour. - Miss Austen & her nephew are returned - but Mr Choles is still absent; - "still absent" say you, "I did not know that he was gone anywhere" - Neither did I know that Lady Bridges was at Godmersham at all, till I was told of her being still there, which I take therefore to be the most approved method of announcing arrivals & departures. - Mr Choles is gone to drive a Cow to Brentford, & his place is supplied to us by a Man who lives in the same sort of way by odd jobs, & among other capabilities has that of working in a garden, which my Mother will not forget, if we ever have another garden here. - In general however she thinks much more of Alton, & really expects to move there. - Mrs Lyell's 130 Guineas rent have made a great impression. To the purchase of furniture, whether here or there, she is quite reconciled, & talks of the Trouble as the only evil. - I depended upon Henry's liking the Alton plan, & expect to hear of something perfectly unexceptionable there, through him. - Our Yarmouth Division seem to have got nice Lodgings; - & with fish almost for nothing, & plenty of Engagements & plenty of each other, must be very happy. - My Mother has undertaken to cure six Hams for Frank; - at first it was a distress, but now it is a pleasure. - She desires me to say that she does not doubt your making out the Star pattern very well, as you have the Breakfast-room-rug to look at. - We have got the 2d vol. of Espriella's Letters, & I read it out aloud by candlelight. The Man describes well, but is horribly anti-english. He deserves to be the foreigner he assumes. Mr Debary went away yesterday, & I being gone with some partridges to St Maries lost his parting visit. - I have heard today from Miss Sharpe, & find that she returns with Miss B. to Hinckley, & will continue there at least till about Christmas, when she thinks they may both travel southward. - Miss B. however is probably to make only a temporary absence from Mr Chessyre, & I shd not wonder if Miss Sharpe were to continue with her; - unless anything more eligible offer, she certainly will. She describes Miss B. as very anxious that she should do so. - Sunday. - I had not expected to hear from you again so soon, & am much obliged to you for writing as you did; but now as you must have a great deal of the business upon your hands, do not trouble yourself with me for the present; - I shall consider silence as good news, & not expect another Letter from you till friday or Saturday. - You must have had a great deal more rain than has fallen here; - Cold enough it has been but not wet, except for a few hours on Wednesday Eveng, & I could have found nothing more plastic than dust to stick in; - now indeed we are likely to have a wet day - & tho' Sunday, my Mother begins it without any ailment. - Your plants were taken in one very cold blustering day & placed in the Dining room, & there was a frost the very same night. - If we have warm weather again they are to be put out of doors, if not my Mother will have them conveyed to their Winter quarters. - I gather some Currants every now & then, when I want either fruit or employment. - Pray tell my little Goddaughter that I am delighted to hear of her saying her lesson so well. - You have used me ill, you have been writing to Martha without telling me of it, & a letter which I sent her on wednesday to give her information of you, must have been good for nothing. I do not know how to think that something will not still happen to prevent her returning by ye 10th - And if it does, I shall not much regard it on my own account, for I am now got into such a way of being alone that I do not wish even for her. - The Marquis has put off being cured for another year; - after waiting some weeks in vain for the return of the Vessel he had agreed for, he is gone into Cornwall to order a Vessel built for himself by a famous Man in that Country, in which he means to go abroad a twelvemonth hence. -

We had two Pheasants last night from Neatham. Tomorrow Eveng is to be given to the Maitlands; - we are just asked, to meet Mrs Heywood & Mrs Duer.

Everybody who comes to Southampton finds it either their duty or pleasure to call upon us; Yesterday we were visited by the eldest Miss Cotterel, just arrived from Waltham. Adeiu - With Love to all, Yrs affecly JA.

Miss Austen
Edward Austen's Esqr
Godmersham Park
Faversham
Kent

56
(sabato 1 - domenica 2 ottobre 1808)
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Castle Square, sabato 1 ott.

Mia cara Cassandra

Stamattina la tua lettera era proprio inaspettata, ed è un bene che abbia portato notizie così buone da controbilanciare la delusione di aver sprecato la mia prima frase, che avevo preparato piena di belle speranze circa il tuo Viaggio, intenzionata a metterle su carta oggi, e a non aspettarmi nulla fino a domani. - Siamo estremamente contente di sapere della nascita del Bambino, (1) e siamo certe che tutto procederà bene come è iniziato; - alla sua Mamma i nostri migliori auguri, e a lui quelli subito dopo per salute e prosperità - anche se immagino che se lui non avrà i primi, non potremmo farne nessuno a lei. - Siamo contente che tutto fosse finito quando sei arrivata - e io sono molto felice di scoprire chi sarà la Madrina. - La Mamma ha passato un po' di tempo a cercare di indovinare il nome. - Il regalo che ti ha dato Henry mi ha fatto molto piacere, e questa volta controllerò il tempo per lui con rinnovato interesse. - Ultimamente abbiamo avuto 4 coppie di Uccelli, in misura uguale da Shalden e da Neatham. (2) - Il ricevimento da Mrs Duer ha prodotto la novità di due vecchie Mrs Pollen e di Mrs Heywood, con le quali la Mamma ha composto un Tavolo di Quadriglia; e di Mrs Maitland e Caroline, e Mr Booth senza le sorelle per uno di Monopoli. - Ho trovato un Marito per entrambe le signorine Maitland; - il Col. Powlett e il Fratello hanno vinto la causa alla corte d'Appello di Argyle, e la conseguenza è così naturale che non devo inventarmi niente per organizzare la cosa. (3) Se il Fratello dovesse per caso essere più sciocco del Colonnello, che fortuna per Eliza. - Martedì Mr Lyford ci ha fatto visita per dirci che era deluso dal mancato arrivo del figlio e della figlia, e che sarebbe stato costretto a tornare a casa lui stesso il mattino successivo; - e dato che ero decisa a non privarlo di alcun piacere l'ho consultato sul mio disturbo. Ha raccomandato del cotone inumidito con olio di mandorle dolci, e il rimedio mi ha fatto bene. - Spero perciò di non avere altro da fare per la ricetta di Eliza che sentirmi molto sinceramente in obbligo con lei per avermela fornita.

Essere stata ricordata da Mrs Tilson mi fa piacere, e se posso userò il suo modello; ma povera Donna! come farà ad andare avanti in questo modo? - Ho appena finito un Foulard per Mrs James Austen, e mi aspetto che il Marito mi dia l'opportunità di mandarglielo tra non molto. Sicuramente una qualche bella giornata di ottobre ce lo porterà in Giardino, fra le tre e le quattro. - Lei ha sentito dire che Miss Bigg si sposerà tra un paio di settimane. Mi auguro che sia così. (4) - Circa un'ora e mezza dopo la conclusione delle vostre fatiche di mercoledì, sono cominciate le nostre; - alle sette sono venuti, Mrs Harrison, le sue due figlie e due Ospiti, con Mr Debary e la sorella maggiore; e il nostro Travaglio non è stato molto più breve di quello della povera Elizabeth, visto che erano le undici quando abbiamo partorito. - Un secondo giro di Monopoli, e molto più lungo a causa dell'aggiunta delle due ragazze, che durante il primo erano rimaste in un angolo della Tavola a giocare a Sciangai tra di loro, è stata la nostra rovina; - tuttavia ha reso completa la prosperità di Mr Debary, visto che li ha vinti entrambi. - Più tardi è arrivato Mr Harrison, e si è seduto accanto al fuoco - per la qual cosa l'ho invidiato, dato che avevamo la solita fortuna di una Serata molto fredda. Quando sono arrivati stava piovendo, ma ha smesso prima che se ne andassero. - Si dice che le signorine Ballard siano molto beninformate; hanno maniere affabili e piacevoli, ma non sono abbastanza spontanee da risultare simpatiche - né sono riuscita a scoprire nulla di preciso sulle Sensazioni che hanno avuto nel loro ultimo Viaggio. - Miss Austen e il nipote sono tornati - ma Mr Choles è ancora assente; - "ancora assente" dirai tu, "non sapevo che fosse andato da qualche parte" - Ma nemmeno io sapevo che Lady Bridges fosse a Godmersham, finché non mi è stato detto che era ancora là, il che perciò lo prendo come il metodo più largamente approvato per annunciare arrivi e partenze. - Mr Choles è andato a portare una Mucca a Brentford, e al suo posto c'è un Uomo che come lui vive di lavori saltuari, e tra le altre capacità ha quella di saper lavorare il giardino, cosa che la Mamma non dimenticherà, se mai qui ne avremo un altro. - Nel complesso comunque lei pensa molto di più ad Alton, e conta davvero di trasferirsi là. - Le 130 Ghinee di affitto di Mrs Lyell le hanno fatto molta impressione. Quanto all'acquisto dei mobili, sia per qui che per là, si è ormai rassegnata, e parla della Confusione come l'unico dei mali. - Per il progetto di Alton conto sull'approvazione di Henry, e da lui mi aspetto qualche informazione completamente irrefutabile sul luogo (5) - La nostra Sezione di Yarmouth (6) sembra aver trovato un grazioso Alloggio; - e con il pesce a quasi niente, abbondanza di Impegni e abbondanza di tutto il resto, devono essere davvero contenti. - La Mamma si è impegnata nella preparazione di sei prosciutti per Frank; - all'inizio è stata una fatica, ma ora è un piacere. - Mi chiede di dirti che non ha dubbi sul fatto che farai un ottimo lavoro per il modello della Stella, dato che puoi regolarti con il tappeto della stanza per la Colazione. - Abbiamo ricevuto il 2° vol. delle Lettere di Espriella, (7) e io l'ho letto ad alta voce a lume di candela. L'Uomo descrive bene, ma è orribilmente anti inglese. Merita di essere lo straniero che pretende di essere. Mr Debary è partito ieri, e io che ero andata con delle pernici a St Maries mi sono persa la sua visita di commiato. - Oggi ho ricevuto notizie da Miss Sharpe, e ho scoperto che tornerà a Hinckley con Miss B., e resterà lì almeno fino a Natale, quando pensa che potranno entrambe intraprendere un viaggio verso il sud. - Comunque è probabile che Miss B. voglia allontanarsi solo per breve tempo da Mr Chessyre, e non mi meraviglierei se Miss Sharpe restasse con lei; - a meno che non le capitasse qualcosa di meglio, certamente lo farà. Dice che Miss B. ci tiene molto che lei faccia così. - Domenica. - Non mi aspettavo di avere di nuovo tue notizie così presto, e ti sono molto obbligata per avermi scritto; ma dato che ora devi avere un bel daffare sulle spalle, per il momento non preoccuparti di me; - considererò il silenzio come buone nuove, e non mi aspetto un'altra tua Lettera fino a venerdì o sabato. - Dovete aver avuto una quantità di pioggia molto maggiore di quella che abbiamo avuto qui; - È stato abbastanza freddo ma non umido, salvo qualche ora mercoledì Sera, e non sono riuscita a trovare nulla di più cedevole della polvere in cui affondare; - adesso è molto probabile che ci sarà una giornata umida - e benché sia domenica, la Mamma la inizia senza nessun malanno. - Le tue piante sono state messe dentro in una giornata di freddo molto ventosa e sistemate in Sala da pranzo, e quella notte c'è stata una gelata. - Se la temperatura diventerà più calda le rimetteremo fuori, altrimenti la Mamma le porterà nei suoi quartieri invernali. - Di quando in quando raccolgo un po' di Uva sultanina, quando sento il bisogno di frutta o di fare qualcosa. - Ti prego di dire alla mia piccola Figlioccia che sono deliziata di aver saputo che recita così bene la lezione. - Mi hai trattata male, avendo scritto a Martha senza dirmelo, e la lettera che le ho mandato mercoledì per darle notizie di te, non è servita a nulla. Non riesco a credere che non succederà nulla che le impedisca di ritornare per il 10 - E se dovesse accadere, non ci farò troppo caso, perché adesso ho imboccato così bene la strada della solitudine che non ho desiderio nemmeno di lei. - Il Marchese ha evitato di preoccuparsi per un altro anno; - dopo aver aspettato invano il ritorno del Vascello si è messo il cuore in pace, è andato in Cornovaglia per ordinare un Vascello costruito apposta per lui da uno che là è famoso, con il quale intende andare all'estero da qui a un anno. -

Ieri sera abbiamo ricevuto due Fagiani da Neatham. La Serata di domani sarà dedicata ai Maitland; - ci hanno appena chiesto di andare a prendere Mrs Heywood e Mrs Duer.

Tutti quelli che vengono a Southampton trovano il modo vuoi per dovere o per piacere di venirci a trovare; Ieri abbiamo avuto la visita di Miss Cotterel, la maggiore, appena arrivata da Waltham. Adieu - Con cari saluti a tutti, la Tua affezionata JA.



(1) Il 28 settembre 1828 era nato Brook-John, undicesimo e ultimo figlio di Edward ed Elizabeth Austen.

(2) Due località della tenuta di Chawton.

(3) La moglie del col. Powlett era fuggita con Lord Sackville (vedi la lettera 53) e il marito aveva chiesto un risarcimento di 10000 sterline che fu poi ridotto a 3000. L'allusione alle sorelle Maitland deriva probabilmente dal fatto che il colonnello abitava, come loro, ad Albion Place, a Southampton.

(4) In effetti Catherine Bigg sposerà il rev. Herbert Hill il 25 ottobre, quasi esattamente dopo "un paio di settimane" dalla data di questa lettera.

(5) La banca di cui Henry era socio aveva aperto una filiale ad Alton, e quindi il fratello avrebbe potuto fornire informazioni attendibili.

(6) Henry ed Eliza Austen erano in vacanza a Yarmouth, sull'isola di Wight.

(7) Letters from England; by Dom Manuel Alvarez Espriella (1807), di Robert Southey (1774-1843), era una descrizione dell'Inghilterra in forma di lettere scritte da un immaginario viaggiatore spagnolo.

57
(Friday 7 - Sunday 9 October 1808)
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Castle Square, Friday Oct. 7. -

My dear Cassandra

Your letter on Tuesday gave us great pleasure, & we congratulate you all upon Elizabeth's hitherto happy recovery; - tomorrow or Sunday I hope to hear of its' advancing in the same stile. - We are also very glad to know that you are so well yourself, & pray you to continue so. - I was rather surprised on Monday by the arrival of a Letter for you from your Winchester Correspondent, who seemed perfectly unsuspicious of your being likely to be at Godmersham; - I took complete possession of the Letter by reading, paying for, & answering it; - and he will have the Biscuits today, - a very proper day for the purpose, tho' I did not think of it at the time. - I wish my Brother joy of completing his 30th year - & hope the day will be remembered better than it was six years ago. - The Masons are now repairing the Chimney, which they found in such a state as to make it wonderful that it shd have stood so long, & next to impossible that another violent wind should not blow it down. We may therefore thank you perhaps for saving us from being thumped with old bricks. - You are also to be thank'd by Eliza's desire for your present to her of dyed sattin, which is made into a bonnet, & I fancy surprises her by its' good appearance. - My Mother is preparing mourning for Mrs E. K. - she has picked her old silk pelisse to peices, & means to have it dyed black for a gown - a very interesting scheme, tho' just now a little injured by finding that it must be placed in Mr Wren's hands, for Mr Chambers is gone. - As for Mr Floor, he is at present rather low in our estimation; how is your blue gown? - Mine is all to peices. - I think there must have been something wrong in the dye, for in places it divided with a Touch. - There was four shillings thrown away; - to be added to my subjects of never failing regret. - We found ourselves tricked into a thorough party at Mrs Maitlands, a quadrille & a Commerce Table, & Music in the other room. There were two pools at Commerce, but I would not play more than one, for the Stake was three shillings, & I cannot afford to lose that, twice in an eveng - The Miss Ms. were as civil & as silly as usual. - You know of course that Martha comes today; yesterday brought us notice of it, & the Spruce Beer is brewed in consequence. - On wednesday I had a letter from Yarmouth to desire me to send Mary's flannels & furs, &c - & as there was a packing case at hand, I could do it without any trouble. - On Tuesday Eveng Southampton was in a good deal of alarm for about an hour; a fire broke out soon after nine at Webbes, the Pastrycook, & burnt for some time with great fury. I cannot learn exactly how it originated, at the time it was said to be their Bakehouse, but now I hear it was in the back of their Dwelling house, & that one room was consumed. - The Flames were considerable, they seemed about as near to us as those at Lyme, & to reach higher. One could not but feel uncomfortable, & I began to think of what I should do, if it came to the worst; - happily however the night was perfectly still, the Engines were immediately in use, & before ten the fire was nearly extinguished - tho' it was twelve before everything was considered safe, & a Guard was kept the whole night. Our friends the Duers were alarmed, but not out of their good Sense or Benevolence. - I am afraid the Webbes have lost a great deal - more perhaps from ignorance or plunder than the Fire; - they had a large stock of valuable China, & in order to save it, it was taken from the House, & throw down anywhere. - The adjoining House, a Toyshop, was almost equally injured - & Hibbs, whose House comes next, was so scared from his senses that he was giving away all his goods, valuable Laces &c, to anybody who wd take them. - The Croud in the High St I understand was immense; Mrs Harrison, who was drinking tea with a Lady at Millar's, could not leave it twelve o'clock. - Such are the prominent features of our fire. Thank God! they were not worse.- Saturday. - Thank you for your Letter, which found me at the Breakfast-Table, with my two companions. - I am greatly pleased with your account of Fanny; I found her in the summer just what you describe, almost another Sister, & could not have supposed that a neice would ever have been so much to me. She is quite after one's own heart; give her my best Love, & tell her that I always think of her with pleasure. - I am much obliged to you for enquiring about my ear, & am happy to say that Mr Lyford's prescription has entirely cured me. I feel it a great blessing to hear again. - Your gown shall be unpicked, but I do not remember its' being settled so before. - Martha was here by half past six, attended by Lyddy; - they had some rain at last, but a very good Journey on the whole; & if Looks & Words may be trusted Martha is very happy to be returned. We receive her with Castle Square-Weather, it has blown a gale from the N.W. ever since she came - & we feel ourselves in luck that the Chimney was mended yesterday. - She brings several good things for the Larder, which is now very rich; we had a pheasant & hare the other day from the Mr Grays of Alton. Is this to entice us to Alton, or to keep us away? - Henry had probably some share in the two last baskets from that Neighbourhood, but we have not seen so much of his handwriting even as a direction to either. Martha was an hour & half in Winchester, walking about with the three boys & at the Pastrycook's. - She thought Edward grown, & speaks with the same admiration as before of his Manners; - she saw in George a little likeness to his Uncle Henry. - I am glad you are to see Harriot, give my Love to her. - I wish you may be able to accept Lady Bridges's invitation, tho' I could not her son Edward's; - she is a nice Woman, & honours me by her remembrance. - Do you recollect whether the Manydown family send about their Wedding Cake? - Mrs Dundas has set her heart upon having a peice from her friend Catherine, & Martha who knows what importance she attaches to the sort of thing, is anxious for the sake of both that there shd not be a disappointment. - Our weather I fancy has been just like yours, we have had some very delightful days, our 5th & 6th were what the 5th & 6th of October should always be, but we have always wanted a fire within doors, at least except for just the middle of the day. - Martha does not find the Key, which you left in my charge for her, suit the Keyhole - & wants to know whether you think you can have mistaken it. - It should open the interior of her High Drawers - but she is in no hurry about it. Sunday. - It is cold enough now for us to prefer dining upstairs to dining below without a fire, & being only three we manage it very well, & today with two more we shall do just as well, I dare say; Miss Foote & Miss Wethered are coming. My Mother is much pleased with Elizabeth's admiration of the rug - & pray tell Elizabeth that the new mourning gown is to be made double only in the body & sleeves. - Martha thanks you for your message, & desires you may be told with her best Love that your wishes are answered & that she is full of peace & comfort here. - I do not think however that here she will remain a great while, she does not herself expect that Mrs Dundas will be able to do with her long. She wishes to stay with us till Christmas if possible. - Lyddy goes home tomorrow; she seems well, but does not mean to go to service at present. - The Wallops are returned. - Mr John Harrison has paid his visit of duty & is gone. - We have got a new Physician, a Dr Percival, the son of a famous Dr Percival of Manchester, who wrote Moral Tales for Edward to give to me. - When you write again to Catherine thank her on my part for her very kind & welcome mark of friendship. I shall value such a Broche very much. - Good bye my dearest Cassandra.

Yrs very affecly JA.

Have you written to Mrs E. Leigh? - Martha will be glad to find Anne in work at present, & I am as glad to have her so found. -

We must turn our black pelisses into new, for Velvet is to be very much worn this winter. -

Miss Austen
Edward Austen's Esqr
Godmersham Park
Faversham
Kent

57
(venerdì 7 - domenica 9 ottobre 1808)
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Castle Square, venerdì 7 ott. 1808. -

Mia cara Cassandra

La tua lettera di martedì ci ha fatto molto piacere, e ci felicitiamo con tutti voi per la finora propizia ripresa di Elizabeth; - domani o domenica spero di sentire che prosegue nella stessa direzione. - Siamo anche molto liete di sapere che tu stia così bene, e ti preghiamo di continuare così. - Lunedì sono rimasta piuttosto sorpresa dall'arrivo di una Lettera per te da parte del tuo Corrispondente di Winchester, che sembrava completamente all'oscuro del fatto che tu fossi a Godmersham e probabilmente anche che ci saresti andata; - ho preso completo possesso della Lettera leggendola, pagandola, e rispondendo; - e lui avrà oggi i Biscotti, - un giorno molto adatto allo scopo, anche se al momento non ci avevo pensato. - Mi auguro che mio Fratello sia contento di completare i suo trent'anni - e spero che la giornata verrà ricordata meglio di quanto lo fu quella di sei anni fa. (1) - I Muratori stanno riparando il Comignolo, che hanno trovato in uno stato tale da meravigliarsi che abbia resistito così a lungo, e da rendere quasi impossibile che un'altra violenta folata di vento non lo facesse volare giù. Forse dobbiamo perciò ringraziare te per non essere state colpite da una gragnuola di vecchi mattoni. - Dobbiamo anche ringraziarti da parte di Eliza per il raso colorato che le hai regalato, diventato un cappellino, che immagino l'abbia sorpresa per quanto è venuto bene. - La Mamma prepara il lutto per Mrs E. K. - ha disfatto la sua vecchia mantella di seta, e intende far tingere i pezzi di nero per farne un vestito - un progetto molto interessante, anche se ora un po' pregiudicato dalla scoperta che dovrà essere affidato alle mani di Mr Wren, perché Mr Chambers ha chiuso. - Quanto a Mr Floor, al momento è piuttosto calato nella nostra stima; com'è il tuo vestito azzurro? - Il mio è a pezzi. Credo che ci sia stato qualcosa di sbagliato nella tintura, perché in alcuni punti si è strappato solo a sfiorarlo. - Sono stati quattro scellini buttati via; - da aggiungere alle mie convinzioni di non cedere mai al rimpianto. - Ci siamo trovate invischiate in un ricevimento ben congegnato da Mrs Maitland, una quadriglia e un Tavolo di Monopoli, e Musica nell'altra stanza. Ci sono stati due giri di Monopoli, ma io non ho partecipato che a uno, perché la Posta era di tre scellini, e non posso permettermi di perderli, due volte in una serata - Le signorine Maitland sono state cortesi e sciocche come al solito. - Ovviamente saprai che Martha è arrivata oggi; l'avevamo saputo ieri, e di conseguenza abbiamo preparato la Birra d'Abete. - Mercoledì ho ricevuto una lettera da Yarmouth dove mi si chiedeva di mandare gli indumenti di flanella, le pellicce ecc. di Mary - e dato che avevamo una cassa d'imballaggio a portata di mano, l'ho potuto fare senza nessun problema. - Martedì Sera a Southampton c'è stato grande allarme per circa un'ora; subito dopo le nove è scoppiato un incendio da Webb, il Pasticcere, e per un po' è stato molto violento. Non sono riuscita a sapere esattamente da che cosa abbia avuto origine, in quel momento si diceva dal Forno, ma adesso ho sentito che è stato dalla Casa, e che una stanza è andata distrutta. - Le Fiamme sono state notevoli, sembravano vicine a casa nostra quanto lo erano quelle a Lyme, ed erano più alte. (2) Non ci si può non sentire a disagio, e comincio a pensare a che cosa dovrei fare, se succedesse il peggio; - fortunatamente la notte è stata del tutto tranquilla, le Pompe sono entrate immediatamente in funzione, e prima delle dieci il fuoco era quasi interamente domato - anche se l'allarme è cessato solo a mezzanotte, e per tutta la notte è rimasto qualcuno di guardia. I nostri amici Duer si sono spaventati, ma non al di là del Buonsenso o dell'Educazione. - Temo che i Webb abbiano avuto grosse perdite - forse più per ignoranza o ruberie che per l'Incendio; - avevano una bella scorta di Porcellane di valore, e con l'intento di salvarle, sono state portate via dalla Casa, e buttate dappertutto. - L'Edificio adiacente, un negozio di giocattoli, ha subito quasi gli stessi danni - e Hibbs, che è lì accanto, si è sentito talmente impaurito che ha distribuito tutta la sua mercanzia, Merletti di valore ecc., a chiunque la volesse. - Da quanto ho capito la Folla a High St era immensa; Mrs Harrison, che stava prendendo il tè da Millar con una Signora, non è potuta andar via prima di mezzanotte. - Queste sono state le caratteristiche principali del nostro incendio. Grazie a Dio! non è successo di peggio. - Sabato. - Grazie per la tua Lettera, che mi ha trovata a tavola per la Colazione, con le mie due compagne. - Quello che dici di Fanny mi fa estremamente piacere; questa estate l'ho trovata proprio come la descrivi tu, quasi un'altra Sorella, e non avrei mai immaginato che una nipote potesse significare così tanto per me. Ha tutto ciò che si potrebbe desiderare; le mando i miei saluti più affettuosi, e dille che la penso sempre con grande gioia. - Ti sono molto obbligata per avermi chiesto del mio orecchio, e sono felice di poter dire che la prescrizione di Mr Lyford mi ha completamente guarita. È una benedizione sentirci di nuovo. - Il tuo vestito sarà disfatto, ma non ricordo che la cosa fosse stata stabilita in questi termini. Martha è arrivata intorno alle sei e mezza, accompagnata da Lyddy; nella parte finale hanno avuto un po' di pioggia, ma nel complesso il Viaggio è andato molto bene; e se si può credere a Sguardi e Parole Martha è molto contenta di essere tornata. L'abbiamo accolta col tipico Tempo di Castle Square, da quando è arrivata, soffia un forte vento da Nord-Ovest - e ci riteniamo fortunate che il Comignolo sia stato riparato ieri. - Ha portato diverse cose buone per la Dispensa, che adesso è molto ricca; l'altro giorno abbiamo ricevuto un fagiano e una lepre dai signori Gray di Alton. Sarà per attirarci ad Alton, o per tenercene lontane? - Henry ha probabilmente avuto parte nei due ultimi cesti da questi Vicini, ma noi non abbiamo visto molto di più della sua calligrafia nell'indirizzo di entrambi. Martha è stata un'ora e mezza a Winchester, a passeggio con i tre ragazzi e in Pasticceria. - Ha trovato Edward cresciuto, e parla con la stessa ammirazione di prima dei suoi Modi; - in George ha visto una leggera somiglianza con lo Zio Henry. - Mi fa piacere che vedrai Harriot, dalle i miei saluti affettuosi. - Mi auguro che tu possa accettare l'invito di Lady Bridges, anche se io non ho potuto farlo con quello del figlio Edward; (3) - è una Donna simpatica, e mi onora ricordandosi di me. - Ti ricordi se la famiglia di Manydown usa distribuire la Torta di Nozze? - Mrs Dundas non vede l'ora di averne un pezzo dalla sua amica Catherine, (4) e Martha che sa quale importanza lei attribuisca a cose del genere, si preoccupa per amore di entrambe che non ne venga fuori una delusione. - Immagino che il tempo qui da noi sia stato proprio come il vostro, abbiamo avuto qualche giornata molto bella, il 5 e il 6 ottobre sono stati quello che il 5 e 6 ottobre dovrebbero essere, ma abbiamo sempre avuto bisogno di fuoco dentro casa, con la sola eccezione delle ore centrali del giorno. - Martha si è accorta che la Chiave, che mi avevi lasciato per lei, non entra nella Serratura - e vuole sapere se pensi di poterti essere sbagliata. - Dovrebbe aprire l'interno dei Cassetti in Alto - ma non ha fretta. Domenica - Adesso fa abbastanza freddo da farci preferire di pranzare di sopra piuttosto che di sotto senza un fuoco, ed essendo solo in tre ce la facciamo molto comodamente, e oggi con due in più ce la faremo ugualmente, immagino; verranno Miss Foote e Miss Wethered. Alla mamma ha fatto molto piacere l'ammirazione di Elizabeth per il tappeto - e ti prega di dire a Elizabeth che ora per gli abiti a lutto la stoffa deve essere raddoppiata solo nel corsetto e nelle maniche. Martha ti ringrazia per il messaggio, e ci tiene a dirti insieme ai suoi saluti affettuosi che il tuo augurio si è avverato e che qui si sente pienamente serena e a suo agio. - Tuttavia non credo che qui ci rimarrà molto tempo, non può aspettarsi che Mrs Dundas possa fare a meno di lei per molto. Si augura di avere la possibilità di restare con noi fino a Natale. - Lyddy torna a casa domani; sembra che stia bene, ma per ora non ha intenzione di andare a servizio. Le Wallop sono tornate. - Mr John Harrison ha fatto la sua visita di cortesia e se n'è andato. - Abbiamo un nuovo Dottore, un certo Dr Percival, il figlio di un famoso Dr Percival di Manchester, che scrisse dei Racconti Morali (5) per Edward da dare a me. - Quando scriverai di nuovo a Catherine ringraziala da parte mia per il gentilissimo e gradito attestato d'amicizia. Apprezzerò moltissimo un tale Broccato. - Arrivederci mia carissima Cassandra.

Con tanto affetto, tua JA.

Hai scritto a Mrs E. Leigh? - Martha sarà lieta di trovare Anne al lavoro al momento, e io sono altrettanto lieta che sia così. -

Dobbiamo rimettere a nuovo i nostri mantelli neri, perché il Velluto andrà moltissimo questo inverno. -



(1) JA evidentemente scherza sull'età del fratello, che il 7 ottobre avrebbe completato i quaranta anni e non i trenta, visto che ne compiva quarant'uno. Su che cosa fosse successo in occasione del compleanno del 1802 non ho trovato traccia.

(2) A Lyme Regis c'era stato un grande incendio il 5 novembre 1803 e Le Faye annota: "questo riferimento indica che gli Austen erano stati in quella città prima delle loro vacanze nel 1804."

(3) Le Faye ipotizza che questo invito possa essere stata un'offerta di matrimonio, avvenuta nell'estate del 1805. Il fatto che subito dopo, come se avesse avuto un'associazione di idee, JA parli di torta di nozze e di Manydown, dove nel dicembre del 1802 aveva accettato e il mattino dopo rifiutato l'offerta di matrimonio di Harris Bigg-Wither, sembra in qualche modo avvalorare questa ipotesi, che comunque non è sorretta da alcun dato certo.

(4) Catherine Bigg era in procinto di sposarsi con il rev. Herbert Hill; il matrimonio fu celebrato il 25 ottobre 1808.

(5) Thomas Percival, A Father's Instructions; consisting of Moral Tales, Fables, and Reflections, designed to promote the Love of Virtue (Insegnamenti di un padre; composti da racconti morali, fiabe, e riflessioni, concepiti per promuovere l'amore per la virtù).

58
(Thursday 13 October 1808)
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Castle Square, Octr 13.

My dearest Cassandra

I have received your Letter, & with most melancholy anxiety was it expected, for the sad news reached us last night, but without any particulars; it came in a short letter to Martha from her sister, begun at Steventon, & finished in Winchester. - We have felt, we do feel for you all - as you will not need to be told - for you, for Fanny, for Henry, for Lady Bridges, & for dearest Edward, whose loss and whose sufferings seem to make those of every other person nothing. - God be praised! that you can say what you do of him - that he has a religious Mind to bear him up, & a Disposition that will gradually lead him to comfort. - My dear, dear Fanny! - I am so thankful that she has you with her! - You will be everything to her, you will give her all the Consolation that human aid can give. - May the Almighty sustain you all - & keep you my dearest Cassandra well - but for the present I dare say you are equal to everything. - You will know that the poor Boys are at Steventon, perhaps it is best for them, as they will have more means of exercise & amusement there than they cd have with us, but I own myself disappointed by the arrangement; - I should have loved to have them with me at such a time. I shall write to Edward by this post. - We shall of course hear from you again very soon, & as often as you can write. - We will write as you desire, & I shall add Bookham. Hamstall I suppose you write to yourselves, as you do not mention it. - What a comfort that Mrs Deedes is saved from present misery & alarm - but it will fall heavy upon poor Harriot - & as for Lady B. - but that her fortitude does seem truely great, I should fear the effect of such a Blow & so unlooked for. I long to hear more of you all. - Of Henry's anguish, I think with greif and solicitude; but he will exert himself to be of use & comfort. With what true sympathy our feelings are shared by Martha, you need not be told; - she is the friend & Sister under every circumstance. We need not enter into a Panegyric on the Departed - but it is sweet to think of her great worth - of her solid principles, her true devotion, her excellence in every relation of Life. It is also consolatory to reflect on the shortness of the sufferings which led her from this World to a better. - Farewell for the present, my dearest Sister. Tell Edward that we feel for him & pray for him. -

Yrs affectely

J Austen

I will write to Catherine.

Perhaps you can give me some directions about Mourning.

Miss Austen
Edward Austen's Esqr
Godmersham Park
Faversham
Kent

58
(giovedì 13 ottobre 1808)
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Castle Square, 13 ott.

Mia carissima Cassandra

Ho ricevuto la tua Lettera, che era attesa con grandissima e malinconica impazienza, poiché la triste notizia ci aveva raggiunte ieri sera, (1) ma senza nessun particolare; era in una breve lettera a Martha dalla sorella, iniziata a Steventon, e conclusa a Winchester. (2) - Siamo state vicine, siamo vicine a voi tutti - con una intensità inesprimibile a parole - a te, a Fanny, a Henry, (3) a Lady Bridges, e al carissimo Edward, la cui perdita e le cui sofferenze sembrano rendere nulle quelle di chiunque altro. - Dio sia lodato! che tu possa dire ciò che hai detto di lui - che ha un Animo religioso a sostenerlo, e un Carattere che lo condurrà gradualmente a riprendersi. Mia cara, cara Fanny! - Sono così sollevata che tu sia con lei! - Sarai tutto per lei, le darai tutta la Consolazione umanamente possibile. - Possa l'Onnipotente sostenervi tutti - e mantenere te mia carissima Cassandra in salute - ma per il momento credo che tu ti senta all'altezza di qualsiasi cosa. - Saprai che i poveri Ragazzi sono a Steventon, forse per loro è meglio, visto che là potranno avere più mezzi per muoversi e divagarsi rispetto a quelli che avrebbero qui da noi, ma confesso la mia delusione per questa decisione; - avrei preferito averli con me in un momento come questo. Scriverò a Edward con questo giro di posta. - Naturalmente avremo di nuovo notizie da te molto presto, e ogni volta che sarai in grado di scrivere. - Scriveremo come hai chiesto di fare, e aggiungerò Bookham. A Hamstall immagino che abbia scritto tu stessa, visto che non ne fai cenno. - È consolante che a Mrs Deedes siano risparmiati questi momenti di infelicità e apprensione (4) - ma saranno pesanti da sopportare per la povera Harriot - e quanto a Lady B. - nonostante la sua forza d'animo sembri davvero grande, temo l'effetto di un Colpo del genere e così inaspettato. Desidero tanto sapere di più di voi tutti. - All'angoscia di Henry, penso con dolore e ansia; ma si sforzerà di essere utile e di arrecare conforto. Con quanta sincera partecipazione i nostri sentimenti siano condivisi da Martha, non c'è bisogno di dirlo; - è un'amica e una Sorella in qualsiasi circostanza. Non è necessario innalzare un Panegirico alla Defunta - ma è dolce pensare ai suoi grandi pregi - ai solidi principi, alla sincera devozione, alle sue grandissime capacità nei rapporti con gli altri. È anche consolante pensare alla brevità delle sofferenze che l'hanno condotta da questo Mondo a uno migliore. - Per il momento addio, mia carissima Sorella, Di' a Edward che gli siamo vicine e preghiamo per lui. -

Con affetto, tua

J Austen

Scriverò a Catherine.

Forse potrai darmi qualche indicazione circa il Lutto.



(1) Elizabeth Bridges, moglie di Edward Austen, era morta il 10 ottobre 1808, pochi giorni dopo la nascita dell'undicesimo figlio, Brook-John.

(2) La moglie di James Austen era andata subito a Winchester a prendere i due figli di Edward che frequentavano là il college, Edward jr. e George.

(3) Il 12 ottobre Henry Austen era arrivato a Godmersham per recare conforto al fratello.

(4) Probabile che fosse imminente la nascita di Charles, uno dei diciannove figli di Sophia Bridges, e per questo motivo si fosse deciso di non dirle per il momento della morte della sorella.

59
(Saturday 15 - Sunday 16 October 1808)
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Castle Square, Saturday night, Octr 15

My dear Cassandra

Your accounts make us as comfortable as we can expect to be at such a time. Edward's loss is terrible, & must be felt as such, & these are too early days indeed to think of Moderation in greif, either in him or his afflicted daughter - but soon we may hope that our dear Fanny's sense of Duty to that beloved Father will rouse her to exertion. For his sake, & as the most acceptable proof of Love to the spirit of her departed Mother, she will try to be tranquil & resigned. - Does she feel You to be a comfort to her, or is she too much overpowered for anything but Solitude? - Your account of Lizzy is very interesting. Poor Child! One must hope the impression will be strong, & yet one's heart aches for a dejected Mind of eight years old. - I suppose you see the Corpse, - how does it appear? - We are anxious to be assured that Edwd will not attend the funeral; but when it comes to the point, I think he must feel it impossible. - Your parcel shall set off on Monday, & I hope the Shoes will fit; Martha & I both tried them on. - I shall send you such of your Mourning as I think most likely to be useful, reserving for myself your Stockings & half the velvet - in which selfish arrangement I know I am doing what you wish. - I am to be in Bombazeen & Crape, according to what we are told is universal here, & which agrees with Martha's previous observation. My Mourning however will not impoverish me, for by having my velvet Pelisse fresh lined & made up, I am sure I shall have no occasion this winter for anything new of that sort. - I take my Cloak for the Lining - & shall send yours on the chance of its' doing something of the same for you - tho' I beleive your Pelisse is in better repair than mine. - One Miss Baker makes my gown, & the other my Bonnet, which is to be silk covered with Crape. - I have written to Edwd Cooper, & hope he will not send one of his Letters of cruel comfort to my poor Brother; - & yesterday I wrote to Alethea Bigg, in reply to a Letter from her. She tells us in confidence, that Cath: is to be married on Tuesday se'night. - Mr Hill is expected at Manydown in the course of the ensuing week. - We are desired by Mrs Harrison & Miss Austen to say everything proper for them to Yourself & Edward on this sad occasion - especially that nothing but a wish of not giving additional trouble where so much is inevitable, prevents their writing themselves to express their Concern. - They seem truly to feel concern. - I am glad you can say what you do of Mrs Knight & of Goodnestone in general; - it is a great releif to me to know that the Shock did not make any of them ill. - But what a task was Yours, to announce it! - Now I hope you are not overpowered with Letter-writing, as Henry & John can ease you of many of your Correspondents. - Was Mr Scudamore in the House at the time, was any application attempted, & is the seizure at all accounted for? - Sunday. - As Edward's letter to his son is not come here, we know that you must have been informed as early as friday of the Boys being at Steventon, which I am glad of. - Upon your Letter to Dr Goddard's being forwarded to them, Mary wrote to ask whether my Mother wished to have her Grandsons sent to her. We decided on their remaining where they were, which I hope my Brother will approve of. I am sure he will do us the justice of beleiving that in such a decision we sacrificed inclination to what we thought best. - I shall write by the Coach tomorrow to Mrs J. A. & to Edward about their mourning, tho' this day's post will probably bring directions to them on that subject from Yourselves. - I shall certainly make use of the opportunity of addressing our Nephew on the most serious of all concerns, as I naturally did in my Letter to him before. The poor Boys are, perhaps more comfortable at Steventon than they could be here, but you will understand my feelings with respect to it. - Tomorrow will be a dreadful day for you all! - Mr Whitfield's will be a severe duty! - Glad shall I be to hear that it is over. - That you are for ever in our Thoughts you will not doubt. - I see your mournful party in my mind's eye under every varying circumstance of the day; - & in the Eveng especially, figure to myself its' sad gloom - the efforts to talk - the frequent summons to melancholy orders & cares - & poor Edward restless in Misery going from one room to the other - & perhaps not seldom upstairs to see all that remains of his Elizabeth. - Dearest Fanny must now look upon herself as his prime source of comfort, his dearest friend; as the Being who is gradually to supply to him, to the extent that is possible, what he has lost. - This consideration will elevate & cheer her. - Adieu. - You cannot write too often, as I said before. - We are heartily rejoiced that the poor Baby gives you no particular anxiety. - Kiss dear Lizzy for us. - Tell Fanny that I shall write in a day or two to Miss Sharpe. -

Yours most truely
J. Austen

My Mother is not ill.

Tell Henry that a Hamper of Apples is gone to him from Kintbury, & that Mr Fowle intended writing on friday (supposing him in London) to beg that the Charts &c. may be consigned to the care of the Palmers. - Mrs Fowle has also written to Miss Palmer to beg she will send for them. -

Miss Austen
Edward Austen's Esqr
Godmersham Park
Faversham
Kent

59
(sabato 15 - domenica 16 ottobre 1808)
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Castle Square, sabato sera, 15 ott.

Mia cara Cassandra

Le notizie che ci dai ci confortano per quanto è possibile in un momento come questo. Per Edward la perdita è terribile, e come tale dev'essere vissuta, e sono davvero passati troppi pochi giorni per pensare a una Mitigazione del dolore, sia da parte sua che da parte di una figlia così afflitta - ma presto si può sperare che il senso del Dovere della nostra cara Fanny verso un Padre così amato farà sentire i suoi effetti. Per amor suo, e come la miglior prova dell'Amore per lo spirito della Madre defunta, cercherà di essere tranquilla e rassegnata. - La tua presenza la vive come un conforto, o è troppo sopraffatta per non desiderare altro che la Solitudine? - Le tue parole su Lizzy sono molto toccanti. Povera Bambina! L'effetto su di lei deve essere forte, eppure un'Anima afflitta di otto anni fa male al cuore. - Immagino che avrai visto il Corpo, - che aspetto ha? - Ci preme essere rassicurate sul fatto che Edward non parteciperà al funerale; (1) ma quando si verrà al dunque, credo che gli sarà impossibile. - Il tuo pacco partirà lunedì, e spero che le Scarpe vadano bene; le abbiamo provate sia Martha che io. - Per il Lutto ti manderò ciò che probabilmente ti sarà più utile, tenendo per me le tue Calze e metà del velluto - una soluzione egoistica che credo sia ciò che desideri. - Io sarò in Bambagino e Crespo, secondo quanto si fa generalmente qui, e che coincide con quanto Martha aveva visto in precedenza. Il Lutto comunque non mi impoverirà, perché con la mia Mantella di velluto foderata e rimodernata, sono certa che non avrò necessità di nulla di nuovo del genere per questo inverno. - Per la Fodera userò il mio Soprabito - e ti manderò il tuo affinché tu possa fare lo stesso - anche se credo che la tua Mantella sia in condizioni migliori della mia. - Una Miss Baker mi farà il vestito, e l'altra la Cuffia, che sarà di seta ricoperta di Crespo. - Ho scritto a Edward Cooper, e spero che non mandi una delle sue Lettere di crudele conforto al mio povero Fratello; - e ieri ho scritto a Alethea Bigg, in risposta a una sua Lettera. Ci dice in confidenza, che Catherine si sposerà martedì della settimana dopo la prossima. Mr Hill è atteso in settimana a Manydown. - Mrs Harrison e Miss Austen ci hanno chiesto di riferire a Te e a Edward tutto ciò che conviene a questa triste circostanza - in particolare che nulla se non il desiderio di non arrecare ulteriore disturbo in un momento in cui ce ne sono tanti inevitabili, le frena dallo scrivere personalmente per esprimere la loro Partecipazione. - Una partecipazione che sembrano sentire con sincerità. - Sono lieta che tu possa dire ciò che hai detto di Mrs Knight e di Goodnestone in generale; - per me è un enorme sollievo sapere che il Colpo non ha inciso sulla loro salute. - Ma che compito dev'essere stato per Te, dare l'annuncio! - Ora spero che tu non sia sopraffatta dalla necessità di scrivere lettere, dato che Henry e John possono alleggerirti di molti dei tuoi Corrispondenti. - Mr Scudamore era in Casa in quel momento, è stato tentato qualche rimedio, e si conoscono le cause dell'attacco? - Domenica. - Dato che la lettera di Edward al figlio non è arrivata qui, abbiamo capito che devi essere stata informata sin da venerdì del fatto che i Ragazzi fossero a Steventon, cosa che mi fa piacere. Subito dopo aver inoltrato loro la tua Lettera al Dr Goddard, Mary ha scritto per chiedere se la Mamma volesse con lei i Nipoti. Abbiamo deciso di lasciarli dove sono, cosa che spero mio Fratello approverà. Sono certa che ci renderà giustizia e comprenderà che con questa decisione abbiamo sacrificato i nostri desideri a ciò che ritenevamo più giusto. - Domani scriverò a mezzo Diligenza postale a Mrs J. A. e a Edward per il loro lutto, anche se probabilmente con la posta di oggi riceveranno istruzioni in merito da Te. - Certamente coglierò l'occasione per parlare a nostro Nipote della maggiore fra tutte le preoccupazioni, come naturalmente ho già fatto nella Lettera precedente che gli ho inviato. I poveri Ragazzi stanno, forse meglio a Steventon di quanto potrebbero stare qui, ma tu comprenderai i miei sentimenti al riguardo. - Domani sarà una giornata tremenda per tutti! - Quello di Mr Whitfield sarà un dovere gravoso! - Sarò lieta quando saprò che è tutto finito. - Che siate sempre nei nostri Pensieri non potete dubitarne. - Vedo con la Mente tutti voi affranti in ogni momento della giornata; e immagino in particolare la triste oscurità della Sera - gli sforzi per parlare - le frequenti e malinconiche incombenze e gli ordini da impartire - e il povero Edward irrequieto nella sua Infelicità che va da una stanza all'altra - e forse non di rado al piano di sopra per rivedere ciò che resta della sua Elizabeth. - La carissima Fanny deve considerarsi come la sua prima fonte di conforto, la sua amica carissima; come la Persona che dovrà poco a poco sostituire, nei limiti del possibile, ciò che egli ha perduto. - Questa riflessione la solleverà e le darà coraggio. - Adieu. - Non potrai scrivere troppo spesso, come ho detto prima. - Siamo davvero contente che il povero Bimbo non vi dia particolari preoccupazioni. - Dai un bacio da parte nostra alla cara Lizzy. - Di' a Fanny che scriverò a Miss Sharpe tra un giorno o due. -

Sinceramente tua
J. Austen

La Mamma non ha problemi di salute.

Di' a Henry che un Cesto di mele è partito per lui da Kintbury, e che Mr Fowle aveva intenzione di scrivergli venerdì (presumendo che fosse a Londra) per pregarlo di consegnare le Carte ecc. ai Palmer. - Mrs Fowle ha scritto anche a Miss Palmer per pregarla di mandarle a prendere. - (2)



(1) All'epoca si usava di più rendere omaggio al defunto con una visita prima della chiusura della bara, mentre al funerale partecipava solo qualche parente, e mai le donne.

(2) Il secondo figlio dei Fowle, Tom Fowle jr., era in quel periodo guardiamarina sull'Indian, uno sloop al comando di Charles Austen; quest'ultimo aveva sposato nel 1807 Fanny Palmer e, quindi, la famiglia della moglie poteva servire da tramite.

60
(Monday 24 - Tuesday 25 October 1808) - no ms.
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Castle Square Monday October 24

My dear Cassandra

Edward and George came to us soon after seven on Saturday, very well, but very cold, having by choice travelled on the outside, and with no great coat but what Mr Wise, the coachman, good-naturedly spared them of his, as they sat by his side. They were so much chilled when they arrived, that I was afraid they must have taken cold; but it does not seem at all the case; I never saw them looking better. They behave extremely well in every respect, showing quite as much feeling as one wishes to see, and on every occasion speaking of their father with the liveliest affection. His letter was read over by each of them yesterday, and with many tears; George sobbed aloud, Edward's tears do not flow so easily; but as far as I can judge they are both very properly impressed by what has happened. Miss Lloyd, who is a more impartial judge than I can be, is exceedingly pleased with them. George is almost a new acquaintance to me, and I find him in a different way as engaging as Edward. We do not want amusement; bilbocatch, at which George is indefatigable, spillikins, paper ships, riddles, conundrums, and cards, with watching the flow and ebb of the river, and now and then a stroll out, keep us well employed; and we mean to avail ourselves of our kind papa's consideration, by not returning to Winchester till quite the evening of Wednesday. Mrs. J. A. had not time to get them more than one suit of clothes; their others are making here, and though I do not believe Southampton is famous for tailoring, I hope it will prove itself better than Basingstoke. Edward has an old black coat, which will save his having a second new one; but I find that black pantaloons are considered by them as necessary, and of course one would not have them made uncomfortable by the want of what is usual on such occasions. Fanny's letter was received with great pleasure yesterday, and her brother sends his thanks and will answer it soon. We all saw what she wrote, and were very much pleased with it. Tomorrow I hope to hear from you, and tomorrow we must think of poor Catherine. Today Lady Bridges is the heroine of our thoughts, and glad shall we be when we can fancy the meeting over. There will then be nothing so very bad for Edward to undergo. The St. Albans, I find, sailed on the very day of my letters reaching Yarmouth, so that we must not expect an answer at present; we scarcely feel, however, to be in suspense, or only enough to keep our plans to ourselves. We have been obliged to explain them to our young visitors, in consequence of Fanny's letter, but we have not yet mentioned them to Steventon. We are all quite familiarised to the idea ourselves; my mother only wants Mrs Seward to go out at Midsummer. What sort of a kitchen garden is there? Mrs J. A. expresses her fear of our settling in Kent, and, till this proposal was made, we began to look forward to it here; my mother was actually talking of a house at Wye. It will be best, however, as it is. Anne has just given her mistress warning; she is going to be married; I wish she would stay her year. On the subject of matrimony, I must notice a wedding in the Salisbury paper, which has amused me very much, Dr Phillot to Lady Frances St Lawrence. She wanted to have a husband I suppose, once in her life, and he a Lady Frances. I hope your sorrowing party were at church yesterday, and have no longer that to dread. Martha was kept at home by a cold, but I went with my two nephews, and I saw Edward was much affected by the sermon, which, indeed, I could have supposed purposely addressed to the afflicted, if the text had not naturally come in the course of Dr Mant's observations on the Litany: "All that are in danger, necessity, or tribulation," was the subject of it. The weather did not allow us afterwards to get farther than the quay, where George was very happy as long as we could stay, flying about from one side to the other, and skipping on board a collier immediately. In the evening we had the Psalms and Lessons, and a sermon at home, to which they were very attentive; but you will not expect to hear that they did not return to conundrums the moment it was over. Their aunt has written pleasantly of them, which was more than I hoped. While I write now, George is most industriously making and naming paper ships, at which he afterwards shoots with horse-chestnuts, brought from Steventon on purpose; and Edward equally intent over the "Lake of Killarney," twisting himself about in one of our great chairs. Tuesday. Your close-written letter makes me quite ashamed of my wide lines; you have sent me a great deal of matter, most of it very welcome. As to your lengthened stay, it is no more than I expected, and what must be, but you cannot suppose I like it. All that you say of Edward is truly comfortable; I began to fear that when the bustle of the first week was over, his spirits might for a time be more depressed; and perhaps one must still expect something of the kind. If you escape a bilious attack, I shall wonder almost as much as rejoice. I am glad you mentioned where Catherine goes today; it is a good plan, but sensible people may generally be trusted to form such. The day began cheerfully, but it is not likely to continue what it should, for them or for us. We had a little water party yesterday; I and my two nephews went from the Itchen Ferry up to Northam, where we landed, looked into the 74, and walked home, and it was so much enjoyed that I had intended to take them to Netley today; the tide is just right for our going immediately after noonshine, but I am afraid there will be rain; if we cannot get so far, however, we may perhaps go round from the ferry to the quay. I had not proposed doing more than cross the Itchen yesterday, but it proved so pleasant, and so much to the satisfaction of all, that when we reached the middle of the stream we agreed to be rowed up the river; both the boys rowed great part of the way, and their questions and remarks, as well as their enjoyment, were very amusing; George's enquiries were endless, and his eagerness in everything reminds me often of his Uncle Henry. Our evening was equally agreeable in its way: I introduced speculation, and it was so much approved that we hardly knew how to leave off. Your idea of an early dinner tomorrow is exactly what we propose, for, after writing the first part of this letter, it came into my head that at this time of year we have not summer evenings. We shall watch the light today, that we may not give them a dark drive tomorrow. They send their best love to papa and everybody, with George's thanks for the letter brought by this post. Martha begs my brother may be assured of her interest in everything relating to him and his family, and of her sincerely partaking our pleasure in the receipt of every good account from Godmersham. Of Chawton I think I can have nothing more to say, but that everything you say about it in the letter now before me will, I am sure, as soon as I am able to read it to her, make my mother consider the plan with more and more pleasure. We had formed the same views on H. Digweed's farm. A very kind and feeling letter is arrived today from Kintbury. Mrs Fowle's sympathy and solicitude on such an occasion you will be able to do justice to, and to express it as she wishes to my brother. Concerning you, she says: "Cassandra will, I know, excuse my writing to her; it is not to save myself but her that I omit so doing. Give my best, my kindest love to her, and tell her I feel for her as I know she would for me on the same occasion, and that I most sincerely hope her health will not suffer." We have just had two hampers of apples from Kintbury, and the floor of our little garret is almost covered. Love to all.

Yours very affectionately,
JA.

Miss Austen
Edward Austen Esq
Godmersham Park
Faversham
Kent

60
(lunedì 24 - martedì 25 ottobre 1808) - no ms.
Cassandra Austen, Godmersham


Castle Square lunedì 24 ottobre

Mia cara Cassandra

Edward e George sono arrivati sabato subito dopo le sette, in ottima salute, ma molto infreddoliti, visto che avevano preferito viaggiare a cassetta, e senza soprabito se non quella parte che Mr Wise, il postiglione, aveva gentilmente condiviso con loro del suo, dato che gli sedevano accanto. Erano così gelati quando sono arrivati, che temevo avessero preso un raffreddore; ma non sembra affatto così; non li ho mai visti con un aspetto migliore. Si comportano benissimo da tutti i punti di vista, mostrano tutta la sensibilità che ci si aspetterebbe da loro, e in ogni occasione parlano del padre con l'affetto più vivo. Ieri tutti e due hanno riletto la sua lettera, e con molte lacrime; George era scosso dai singhiozzi, le lacrime di Edward non sgorgano così facilmente; ma per quanto io possa giudicare sono entrambi colpiti in modo appropriato da quanto è successo. Miss Lloyd, che è un giudice più imparziale di quanto possa essere io, è estremamente contenta di loro. George è quasi una nuova conoscenza per me, e lo trovo in modo diverso affascinante come Edward. Le distrazioni non ci mancano; bilbocatch, (1) a cui George è instancabile, sciangai, barchette di carta, indovinelli, enigmi, e carte, insieme a osservare il flusso e riflusso del fiume, e di tanto in tanto fare un giretto fuori, ci tengono piacevolmente occupati; e intendiamo approfittare della premura del nostro buon papà, non tornando a Winchester fino a mercoledì pomeriggio. Mrs J. A. non ha avuto tempo di procurargli più di un cambio di vestiti; gli altri glieli stiamo facendo fare qui, e sebbene non credo che Southampton sia famosa per la sartoria, spero che si dimostrerà meglio di Basingstoke. Edward ha una vecchia giacca nera, che gli eviterà di farsene una nuova, ma vedo che considerano necessari i pantaloni neri, e naturalmente non vogliamo metterli in imbarazzo per la mancanza di ciò che si usa in queste occasioni. Ieri la lettera di Fanny è stata accolta con grande piacere, e il fratello le manda i suoi ringraziamenti e risponderà presto. Abbiamo letto tutti quello che ha scritto, e ne siamo stati molto contenti. Domani spero di avere notizie da te, e domani penseremo alla povera Catherine. Oggi è Lady Bridges la protagonista dei nostri pensieri, e saremo liete quando potremo presumere che la cerimonia sia terminata. Per Edward non ci sarà nulla di peggio da affrontare. So che il St Albans è salpato lo stesso giorno in cui la mia lettera è arrivata a Yarmouth, (2) cosicché per il momento non dobbiamo aspettarci una risposta; non siamo, tuttavia, molto in ansia, o meglio solo quel tanto da tenere per noi i nostri progetti. Siamo state costrette a esporli ai nostri giovani ospiti, a seguito della lettera di Fanny, ma non ne abbiamo ancora fatto menzione a Steventon. Ormai ci siamo tutte familiarizzate con l'idea; la mamma vuole solo che Mrs Seward se ne vada prima dell'estate. Che genere di orto c'è là? Mrs J. A. manifesta il timore che noi ci si stabilisca nel Kent, e, finché non è stata fatta quella proposta, qui avevamo cominciato ad abituarci a questa prospettiva; la mamma in effetti parlava di una casa a Wye. Comunque, sarà meglio così. (3) Anne ha appena avvertito la padrona; sta per sposarsi; mi auguro che completi l'anno. A proposito di matrimoni, ho notato un annuncio di nozze sul giornale di Salisbury, che mi ha divertita moltissimo, Il Dr Phillot con Lady Frances St Lawrence. Immagino che lei avesse bisogno di un marito, almeno una volta nella vita, e lui di una Lady Frances. Spero che il tuo gruppo dolente fosse in chiesa ieri, e non abbia più questo da temere. Martha è stata confinata in casa da un raffreddore, ma io sono andata con i miei due nipoti, e ho visto che Edward è stato molto colpito dal sermone, che, in effetti, avrei immaginato appositamente rivolto agli afflitti, se il testo non fosse semplicemente emerso nel corso delle osservazioni del Dr Mant sulla Litania: "Tutti quelli che sono in pericolo, nel bisogno, o in pena", era l'argomento. Le condizioni del tempo non ci hanno permesso poi di andare oltre il molo, dove George si è divertito molto fino a quando siamo rimasti là, correndo in giro da una parte all'altra, e saltando subito a bordo di una carboniera. La sera a casa abbiamo letto i Salmi e altri brani della Bibbia, e un sermone, e sono stati molto attenti; ma non devi aspettarti di sentire che non siano tornati ai loro giochi nel momento in cui abbiamo finito. La zia ne ha scritto bene, il che è più di quanto sperassi. Mentre sto scrivendo, George è impegnatissimo a costruire e battezzare barchette di carta, alle quali subito dopo spara con i semi di ippocastano, portati apposta da Steventon; e Edward è ugualmente intento a leggere il "Lake of Killarney", (4) raggomitolato in una delle nostre poltrone grandi. Martedì. La tua lettera così fitta mi fa vergognare delle mie righe larghe; mi hai mandato un bel po' di materiale, la maggior parte molto gradito. Quanto al prolungamento del tuo soggiorno, non è nulla di più di quanto mi aspettassi, e di ciò che deve essere, ma non puoi pensare che mi faccia piacere. Tutto ciò che dici di Edward è davvero confortante; incominciavo a temere che quando il trambusto della prima settimana fosse passato, potesse per un certo periodo essere più depresso, e forse ci si può ancora aspettare qualcosa del genere. Se tu riuscirai a evitare un attacco biliare, ne sarò meravigliata quanto contenta. Sono lieta che tu abbia detto dove va oggi Catherine; (5) è un buon programma, ma in genere si può contare sul fatto che le persone di buonsenso ne concepiscano di simili. La giornata è cominciata in allegria, ma non è probabile che continui come dovrebbe, per loro e per noi. Ieri abbiamo fatto una piccola gita sull'acqua; io e i miei due nipoti siamo andati dal traghetto sull'Itchen fino a Northam, dove abbiamo approdato, abbiamo osservato bene la 74, (6) e siamo tornati a casa a piedi, ed è stato così divertente che avevo intenzione di portarli oggi a Netley; la marea è giusta per avviarsi immediatamente dopo mezzogiorno, ma temo che pioverà; se non riusciremo ad andare così lontano, comunque, potremo forse fare un giro dal traghetto al molo. Ieri non avevo proposto nulla di più di attraversare l'Itchen, ma la cosa si è dimostrata così piacevole, e così divertente per tutti, che quando eravamo a metà tra le due sponde siamo stati tutti d'accordo a risalire il fiume; entrambi i ragazzi hanno remato per gran parte del percorso, e le loro domande e i loro commenti, così come la loro gioia, sono stati molto divertenti. Gli interrogativi di George erano inesauribili, e il suo entusiasmo per tutto mi rammenta spesso suo Zio Henry. La serata è stata a suo modo altrettanto gradevole: li ho introdotti a "speculation", (7) ed è piaciuto tanto che abbiamo fatto fatica a smettere. La tua idea di un pranzo anticipato per domani è esattamente quello che ci eravamo proposti noi, poiché, dopo aver scritto la prima parte di questa lettera, mi è venuto in mente che in questo periodo dell'anno non ci sono le serate estive. Oggi controlleremo la luce, affinché domani non si debba farli viaggiare con il buio. Mandano i saluti più affettuosi al papà e a tutti, con i ringraziamenti di George per la lettera arrivata con l'ultima posta. Martha prega mio fratello di essere certo del suo interessamento in tutto ciò che riguarda lui e la sua famiglia, e della sua sincera partecipazione alla nostra gioia nel ricevere qualsiasi buona nuova da Godmersham. Su Chawton credo di non avere nulla di più da dire, se non che tutto ciò che ne dici nella tua lettera che ora ho davanti a me, ne sono certa, farà sì che la mamma, non appena potrò leggergliela, consideri il progetto con piacere sempre crescente. Ci eravamo fatte la stessa opinione sulla fattoria di H. Digweed. Oggi è arrivata una lettera molto cortese e commossa da Kintbury. Saprai rendere giustizia alla partecipazione e alla sollecitudine di Mrs Fowle in una tale occasione, e saprai esprimerla a mio fratello, come lei desidera. Riguardo a te, dice: "Cassandra, lo so, mi scuserà per non aver scritto a lei; non è per risparmiare me che lo faccio ma lei. Dalle i miei migliori, più affettuosi saluti, e dille che sento per lei ciò che so lei sentirebbe per me nella stessa occasione, e che spero in tutta sincerità che la sua salute non abbia a soffrirne." Abbiamo appena ricevuto due ceste di mele da Kintbury, e il pavimento della nostra piccola soffitta ne è quasi coperto. Saluti affettuosi a tutti.

Con tanto affetto, tua
JA.



(1) "Bilbocatch" è l'inglesizzazione del francese "bilboquet", ovvero "cup-and-ball", un gioco che consiste nel far entrare una pallina una specie di tazza, alla quale è collegata con un filo; non ho trovato il nome italiano di questo gioco.

(2) Yarmouth, sull'isola di Wight, era la nuova residenza di Frank Austen e il St Albans la sua nuova nave.

(3) Le Austen, insieme all'amica Martha Lloyd, avevano da tempo intenzione di lasciare Southampton, e avevano pensato a una casa in qualche località del Kent (Wye era una cittadina di campagna vicina a Godmersham); la lettera di Fanny evidentemente conteneva l'offerta di Edward Austen di una casa per la madre e le sorelle nella sua proprietà dell'Hampshire, il cottage di Chawton dove si trasferiranno l'estate successiva.

(4) Anna Maria Porter (1780-1832), The Lake of Killarney (1804).

(5) Il 25 ottobre, data della seconda parte di questa lettera, era il giorno del matrimonio tra Catherine Bigg e il rev. Herbert Hill.

(6) Northam era un piccolo borgo sul fiume Itchen, a circa un miglio da Southampton, dove c'erano i cantieri navali; si trattava quindi presumibilmente di una nave da guerra in costruzione da 74 cannoni.

(7) Gioco in cui si comprano e vendono le carte e la vittoria va a chi riesce a mantenere quella di valore più alto.

  41-50      |     indice lettere     |     home page     |      61-70